Drinks

Rompope (Mexican Egg Nog)

4.78 from 31 votes
This Rompope recipe is a delicious Latin American version of egg nog full of flavor, perfectly creamy, and perfect for the holiday.
Two mugs of Rompope next to each other, on a tray.

Hi Bold Bakers!

Rompope is a delicious Latin American version of egg nog full of flavor, perfectly creamy, and just the right amount of sweetness. It also comes with a mystery — one I hope you can help me solve! 

Rompope is so popular in Mexico, you can get it in stores year-round, but anyone who truly loves the Christmasy drink will tell you store-bought doesn’t hold a candle to homemade rompope. 

[ Did you know you can make your own Coffee Creamer? Get my 3 flavored recipes! ]

This recipe is perfect for the holidays. Rompope is very simple to make, and another big benefit to making homemade? You can decide how much rum or brandy goes in (or none at all if it’s for the kiddies)! 

What Is Rompope?

Rompope, which is iconically yellow because it uses only the egg yolk, is a popular drink made of milk, sugar, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, eggs, rum or brandy, vanilla extract, and baking soda. (I know, I know — baking soda? We’ll discuss later.)

It’s a traditional drink in Mexico, and it’s said it was invented by nuns at a convent in Puebla, Mexico. People outside of the convent soon started to hear about how delicious rompope was, and the nuns began to sell it!

The nun who is said to have created rompope added a secret ingredient that is still unknown! (Maybe the baking soda?)

A glass of Mexican Rompope next to a few sticks of cinnamon.

Why Do You Put Baking Soda In Rompope (Mexican Egg Nog)?

The truth is — I’m not sure! That’s the mystery of this drink. If you know, please leave a comment to tell me! I’m beyond curious!!

do have some theories (I did a deep dive in research and put out some feelers to friends.) Please keep in mind these are just theories as to why baking soda is a traditional ingredient in rompope. 

The first theory is that baking soda can be used to thicken liquids. It’s not commonly used to do so because it does have a somewhat bitter taste, but it is possible. Maybe that’s what helps make rompope extra creamy?

The second theory goes back to the history of rompope. The nun in Puebla is said to have added a “secret ingredient.” I suspect that the ingredient may have been “tequesquite.” 

Tequesquite is a natural mineral salt that has been around since pre-Hispanic times, and it is only mined in specific locations in Mexico. One of those locations just happens to be Totolcingo lagoon, in the state of Puebla! Typically, tequesquite is used to complement corn products, like tamales, but it is used in a number of other traditional Mexican dishes as well. 

But do you know what people use when tequesquite isn’t available? Baking soda! One of the major components of tequesquite is sodium bicarbonate, AKA baking soda.

OR, it could be, according to some chefs, adding a little baking soda prevents the milk from curdling.

But that’s not as much fun as trying to figure out a secret ingredient from a nun who lived in the 17th century.

(And if you know the real reason why baking soda is included, please tell me in the comments!)

What You Need To Make Rompope

How To Make Rompope

Making rompope is a lot easier than trying to figure out that mystery ingredient. Here’s how you do it (and don’t forget to get the full recipe with measurements on the page below):

  1. Combine milk, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon stick, cloves, and nutmeg in a large saucepan and place over medium heat until it comes to a simmer.
  2. Turn off the heat and allow the spices to steep in the milk for about 15 minutes.
  3. While the milk steeps, place a large bowl with a strainer over it near your stove.
  4. After the milk has steeped for 15 minutes, whisk the egg yolks in a bowl and then stir them into the milk, whisking constantly.
  5. Turn the heat back on to medium-low and cook the milk and egg mixture. Be sure to stir constantly. It is ready when the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.
  6. Once it’s reached that thickness, immediately strain the mixture to stop the cooking and remove the cinnamon stick, cloves, and any curds that may have formed.
  7. Stir in the rum or brandy and add the vanilla extract.

Hands holding a mug of Mexican Egg Nog!

Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips For Making Rompope

  • Feel free to make this drink non-alcoholic by replacing the rum/brandy with an equal amount of milk.
  • Make rompope ice cream! Reduce the rum or brandy to 2 tablespoons (or leave it out) and cool it in the refrigerator overnight. Churn it according to your ice cream maker’s directions, or freeze it in popsicle molds.
  • Once your yolks have been added, be sure to watch the rompope very carefully and stir constantly. This can go from thickened to curdled very quickly.
  • Don’t forget to prep your bowl and strainer! You need to strain the rompope right away when it’s done cooking. 
  • You can serve rompope both chilled or warm!

How Do I Store Rompope?

Rompope tastes better as the flavors sit together! You can serve it right away or store it in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. 

Make More Holiday Recipes!

And don’t forget to buy my Bigger Bolder Baking Cookbook!

Full (and printable) recipe below!

Rompope Recipe (Mexican Egg Nog)

4.78 from 31 votes
This Rompope recipe is a delicious Latin American version of egg nog full of flavor, perfectly creamy, and perfect for the holiday.
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 8 servings
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
This Rompope recipe is a delicious Latin American version of egg nog full of flavor, perfectly creamy, and perfect for the holiday.
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (32floz/900ml) whole milk
  • 1 cup (8oz/225g) granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 whole cloves
  • teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 10 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup (4oz/115ml) rum or brandy
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions

  • In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine milk, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon stick, cloves, and nutmeg and bring to a simmer.
  • Turn off the heat and let the spices steep in the milk for 15 minutes.
  • While the milk is steeping, set up a large bowl with a strainer over it near the stove.
  • After the milk has steeped and cooled for 15 minutes, whisk the egg yolks in a small bowl and stir into the milk, whisking constantly.
  • Turn the heat back on to medium-low and cook the milk and egg mixture, stirring constantly until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.
  • Immediately strain the mixture to stop the cooking and to remove the cinnamon stick, cloves, and any curds that may have started to form.
  • Stir in the rum or brandy and vanilla extract.
  • Serve right away or store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

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Teresa
Teresa
2 months ago

Cant wait to try this…I love all things egg nog…I like that this is cooked, I dont like to do raw egg egg nogs..Ive been making custards and egg nogs for years…If yours does curdle more than straining will fix, an immersion blender fixes that right up, usually that happens when you add the eggs to liquid that is too warm or use the whole egg, but Im sure you know that 🙂

Last edited 2 months ago by Teresa
M W
M W
2 months ago

I have thé most wonderful childhood memory of rompope! In Mexico at the local market, their was a little place where my mom bought me a vanilla milkshake, évery time we went there. Untill this day I remember that feeling of happynes because that shake was just WAAAW.
Thé secret ingredient for that milkshake was ROMPOPE.
So thank U for this recipe.
I am D E F I N I T E L Y making this.

2 months ago

I love egg nog so this seemed the perfect recipe to try for the holidays. I made it with dark rum and the spice flavour was super tasty. My only suggestion would be to reduce the sugar (half the amount is sufficient). I found my first batch too sweet so I made another one with far less sugar and combined them. I gave little bottles for presents and my mum, who doesn’t usually drink alcohol, loved the taste.
Definitely one to make again next year. Thanks for sharing Gemma

sarahtmesquita
2 months ago

I have been wanting to try (making and tasting) eggnog, and bless you for this recipe!!! I loved making it and the flavors are superb…! I was told that eggnog is an acquired taste…! and boy oh boy…!! loved it… I reduced the recipe to use only 2 egg yolks but it was fabulous..!! I will definitely make this again! I can’t decide if it like it warm or cold, but I am going to make this for every Christmas henceforth..! Thank you so much! I will try the cranberry Orange Cake next! (Strangely a couple of days ago was… Read more »

David
David
2 months ago

In step 4, the egg yolks should be tempered by the 15 minute cooled but still very warm milk. Then slowly added and whisked back into the milk in the sauce pan. Other than that I can’t wait to start it.

Last edited 2 months ago by David
Albaro Ibarra
Albaro Ibarra
2 months ago

I love Rompope. It is very versatile and can also do mix drinks, desserts and sauces for food. I learned about different recipes from rompopecoronadousa.com.

knittingkitty
2 months ago

What can you substitute for the rum if you want it non-alcoholic??

PartIrish
2 months ago

Can one use non dairy milk in this recipe?

Sigita
2 months ago

Oh, I was waiting for this recipe. I love eggnog, and this particular recipe is new to me. Definitely going to try this out. Thank you, Gemma 😍💖
Also, I heard baking soda added to milk is cancelling the lactose, maybe that’s why. So everyone can drink it? I might be wrong though 🤔

About Us

Meet Gemma

About Us

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I want to help you bake with confidence anytime, anywhere! No matter your skills, I have you covered. Sign up for my FREE weekly emails and join millions of other Bold Bakers in the community for new recipes, baking techniques, and more every week!

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