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Homemade Chocolate Croissants

Homemade Chocolate Croissants

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Hi Bold Bakers!

Croissants are delicate and delicious pastries that require technique but they’re much easier to make than most people think. I will show how easy these lovely treats are to create. 

Although Homemade Chocolate Croissants do require a few steps, the good thing is that it’s the same step over and over. Once you get the hang of it, you will make them faster each time.

My dough is not made using the traditional croissant method. I freeze my butter and grate it into my dough. I freeze the butter because I want it as cold as possible and it gets down to pea size pieces which gets easily distributed throughout the dough.

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This dough can be made by hand, no kitchen mixer needed.

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They are incredibly soft and flaky, and you can make them ahead of time, freeze them, and bake them off fresh whenever you want.

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I always opt for an addition of chocolate whenever I  can but if you like to keep them plain that’s ok too.

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Homemade Chocolate Croissants are a labour of love, I’m not gonna lie. However when see you your hard work coming out of the oven all golden brown it is well worth it.

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Here is a step by step of the folds you have to do to your dough. I need visuals when I bake so I hope these help you tooHomemade Chocolate Croissants, croissants, Chocolate croissants, Homemade croissants, homemade pastries, Breakfast pastries, baking, Homemade breakfast pastries, Gemma Stafford, bigger bolder baking, baking, breakfast, pastries, Danish, bold baking, chocolate, chocolate recipes

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4.54 from 45 votes
Homemade Chocolate Croissants
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 
Servings: 6 -8
Author: adapted from Super Golden Bakes
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup (120ml/4floz) warm milk
  • 1 1/4 cup (250g/ 8 ¾ oz) strong bread flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 11 tablespoons (150g/5.3 oz) butter, frozen
  • 4 tablespoons (50g/ 1 ¾ oz) sugar
  • 2 tsp (7g /1 sachet) dry yeast
  • Chocolate chips or bar (I recommend 72% cocoa solids)
  • 1 egg yolk beaten with 1 tbsp milk to glaze
Instructions
  1. Warm your milk until it is body-temperature (just warmed)
  2. In a large bowl add the flour, salt, sugar and yeast and whisk to combine.
  3. Grate the frozen butter straight into your flour. You want pea sized pieces of cold butter
  4. Pour in the milk and gently combine to a dough using a spoon until the dough just comes together. You want the butter to remain in pea-sized pieces so don't be too enthusiastic when mixing the dough! don’t add liquid
  5. Turn the dough out of a lightly floured work top and press together to form a square. It will be soft. Wrap in clingfilm and put in the fridge for 90 minutes
  6. Lightly dust your worktop and rolling pin with flour.
  7. Roll your dough out to a rectangle roughly 14 ½ inches by 10 inches
  8. Fold the short sides of the dough into the middle (follow the pictures above the recipe)
  9. Rotate the dough by a quarter turn. Roll out slightly to lengthen. Fold the short ends towards the middle
  10. Flip the dough over so the seams are underneath. Roll it out again repeating the folding steps 2 more times. The dough will become more elastic as you are rolling and folding it. If at any point the butter softens too much, cover and pop in the freezer to firm it before continuing with rolling and folding.
  11. The dough should be formed into a smallish rectangle. Wrap it twice with cling film and put in the fridge for a couple of hours or, ideally, overnight.
  12. Roll the dough out to a rectangle three times as long as it is wide and at least 4mm thick. Trim the edges with a pastry scraper
  13. Cut the dough into triangles about 30cm/12in long and 8cm/3in at the base.
  14. Cut a small slit in the centre of each triangle base
  15. Gently stretch the corners and tip, add your chocolate to the wide end then loosely roll the dough up. Place, tip side down, on a large tray lined with baking paper.
  16. Repeat with the rest of the dough, spacing the croissants a few inches apart on the tray
  17. Cover loosely with greased cling film and let the croissants rise for 2-3 hours at room temperature - sorry, there are no shortcuts here!
  18. Preheat the oven to 230C | 450F. Brush the croissants with the egg wash and bake for ten minutes then reduce temperature to 190C | 375F and bake for another 5 ish minutes or until the croissants are a deep golden brown. Cool on a wire rack before serving.

 

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453 Comments

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  1. Avalina on October 28, 2018 at 6:55 am

    Hi Gemma the dough keeps breaking when I try to roll it out…. What do I do about that and why is it happening ??? …. Can I use all purpose flour instead ???

    • Gemma Stafford on October 29, 2018 at 3:26 am

      Hi Avalina,
      it sounds like there was not sufficient liquid in the dough. When you say breaking up, that would indicate it was dry. If you mean that it is over stretched, then that is a different matter. You can recover from either. What I am interested in is whether or not it proofed for you. If it did, then the liquids would seem to have been ok. I am mystified!
      you could use AP flour for this, but it does not give as good a result. Do not waste this dough. Form it, proof it and bake it, in what ever way you can get it to come together. All will be well,
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Bindya on October 26, 2018 at 9:03 pm

    Hi!!! I love all ur videos & gonna try them soon. First I’ll soon try ur croissants recpie. Before that I have few questions, I would like to freeze some for later use. So, from which point I can freeze, from recpie instruction no 15 or 17.
    After defrosting before baking should I again give a proofing time.
    The recpie asks for strong bread flour. What is the substitute for it. Can I add ” vital wheat gluten” & in what quantity.
    Plz reply as early

    With love
    Bindya

    • Gemma Stafford on October 28, 2018 at 4:49 am

      Hi Bindya,
      Thank you for your kind words.
      You can add one teaspoon of vital wheat to one cup/5ozs of all purpose flour to increase the gluten. Croissant wil lappreciate a strong flour, but many yeast bakes will do well with all purpose flour.
      When you are freezing these for later use then it is best to freeze them when they have been formed, just before the second proofing Wrap them well for the freezer. If you open chill them in the freezer, 30 minutes or so, it will be easy to wrap well in cling wrap, and in a freezer bag or box. When you wish to bake you remove from the freezer, defrost slightly, remove the wrap, cover lightly, and proof well before baking.
      All baked goods are best made and baked, but this will give you a good result,
      Gemma 🙂

  3. A.J. on October 26, 2018 at 1:11 pm

    Hey I’d really like to make this gluten free is there anything I can do to make sure it works the same?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 27, 2018 at 1:54 pm

      Gosh A.J when you change up an ingredients, especially one like flour there is always a chance you will not end up with the same. You can use gluten free flour though just be prepared for a different result. It might be better to find a recipe specifically for gluten free croissants.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  4. Bindya on October 25, 2018 at 10:03 pm

    Hi!!! Love all ur videos. I wanna try this recipe shortly. My question is
    1) if I want to freeze croissants for later use , I need to freeze from step 15 or 17.
    2)After defrosting should it proof it again before baking.
    Also can I freeze crazy dough cinnamon roll the same way. If so, from which step I can freeze it.

    Loads of Love
    Bindya

    • Gemma Stafford on October 27, 2018 at 5:08 pm

      Hi Bindya,

      Im so glad you like my videos :).

      Freeze the croissant step 15. Yes after freezing defrost them and let them proof at room temperature for roughly 1 1/2 hours. They need extra time because they are so cold from the freezer.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  5. Robin Juliano on October 24, 2018 at 9:08 am

    I love the video. I can’t wait to try this for the Holidays. I love the prep ahead of time aspect. I love making Ravioli ahead of time from scratch and this is similar. Love it!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 25, 2018 at 4:48 am

      Hi Robin,
      Wow! good job you with the pasta making! not the easiest thing to do, the first time I made it was in Italy, and I was a bit unsure of the process, but it all went well in the end. Ravioli are yummy, and the fillings so variable, I am sure you are popular in your house.
      I am happy you will try the croissant, really worthwhile, and I think you will make great job of this recipe. Let us see the result.
      Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  6. Lety on October 22, 2018 at 7:12 pm

    Hi, these look delicious..my question is regarding baking. If I do not use convection oven what temp and how long do I bake them ? I love your videos…Thank so much

    • Gemma Stafford on October 23, 2018 at 9:48 am

      Hi Lety,
      I am not sure about your oven!
      The temperature will be the same as indicated. Preheat the oven to 230C | 450F. Brush the croissants with the egg wash and bake for ten minutes then reduce temperature to 190C | 375F and bake for another 5 ish minutes or until the croissants are a deep golden brown. Cool on a wire rack before serving.
      I hope this is of help, this is for a conventional oven,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Lety on October 24, 2018 at 8:41 pm

        Thank you so much for your quick reply. I have my folded dough chilling in the refrigerator and will roll out tomorrow.

        • Gemma Stafford on October 25, 2018 at 2:51 am

          Hi Lety,
          good for you, I hope all will be well,
          Gemma 🙂

  7. AJ Daisy on October 16, 2018 at 10:13 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    I wanted to ask whether whole wheat flour would work for this recipie.
    Thanks,
    AJ

    • Gemma Stafford on October 17, 2018 at 2:28 am

      Hi there,
      There is a reason why croissants are not made with wholewheat flour, and that is that it is not so successful. This is a light, delicate confection. Wholewheat brings a lot of nutrition, but very little in the way of a light texture, it tends to make for a dense bread.
      You could try it, and if you do it may be best to use 1/3 wholewheat flour to strong white flour. A little extra sugar will help the yeast along, and do sponge the yeast no matter which one you use. Whole wheat flour takes up liquid in a different way too, so take it easy!
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar, or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form/sponge on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      I hope this is of help, do let us know if you try it,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Zainab on October 11, 2018 at 6:28 am

    What can we use instead of yeast… Is there any substitute

    • Gemma Stafford on October 13, 2018 at 2:50 pm

      Unfortunately you need yeast for my croissants but have you seen my new No Yeast Cinnamon Rolls?

  9. Nency Majethiya on October 8, 2018 at 7:09 am

    Hi…. Can I use instant yeast instead of dry active yeast that you have used? Also what would be the proportion then? Also I would love if I could find more options for the filling. 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on October 9, 2018 at 3:27 am

      Hi there,
      The quantity will be the same. Here is a look through yeast:
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator. This will need sponging before use.
      Instant Dry Yeast: This is the one which can be added directly to flour, and does not need sponging.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      I hope this will help you with your yeast baking,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. Daniya on October 6, 2018 at 11:21 pm

    Thank hi gemma my croissants dint rise much n the inner side was like not cooked properly im sharing the pic of inside plus the outside had cracks n my dough was too soft i used all purpose flour kindly help me out

    • Gemma Stafford on October 7, 2018 at 3:34 pm

      Hi Daniya,

      I saw the picks. I think they look great but I believe you. Did they ever rise at all in the whole process of making the dough?

      The addition of extra flour might have had something to do with it. Possibly but not certain.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  11. Khadija on September 14, 2018 at 11:57 pm

    HiGemma,
    Can i use all purpose flour instead of bread flour ???
    Plz reply asap🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on September 15, 2018 at 1:57 am

      Hi there,
      For this bake the stronger flour works best, however you can try it with all purpose flour. The higher the protein content in the flour the better, check the packs in your store, it varies.
      Try it, it will not be a fail, follow the instructions for best results,
      Gemma 🙂

  12. Reshma on September 8, 2018 at 3:47 am

    Hi gemma – Loving these recipes!! As a no-egg vegerarian, What can I substitute the eggwash with to give it that glaze?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2018 at 2:39 pm

      Yes absolutely. Just just milk. It works well as ‘egg wash’

      Best,
      Gemma.

  13. Valeriesultan on September 7, 2018 at 10:20 am

    I normally remember puff pastry with cold water

  14. Nikki on September 7, 2018 at 10:09 am

    Hey! Your recipes always turn out perfect! Just had a doubt…Could I use plain flour instead of bread flour? How would it change my croissant?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2018 at 3:06 pm

      Hi Nikki,

      Glad you like my recipes. Yes you can use plain flour but just note that plain flour needs less liquid so you might need to hold some back and proceed with caution.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  15. Valeriesultan on September 7, 2018 at 9:30 am

    I have done this pastry dough a few times the last two I don’t know if my milk it has been two warm because it’s seems to make my dough a bit Teo soft even by putting it on the fridge so I don’t know what I might be doing lately, when I touch the milk is warm to the touch, I’m still am being able to make my layer and seeing them after baking and it’s delicuios but it’s giving me a lot of work and I have been having to add a little more flour than usual because it will become two sof, any clue or help please

    • Gemma Stafford on September 9, 2018 at 8:35 pm

      So I’m glad you are still able to work with it but I think the issue is just that flours are different all over the world so next time when you are adding in liquid don’t add it all in at one time. Add a liquid little by little until you get your dough.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  16. Valeriesultan on August 20, 2018 at 6:52 am

    Hello just one question how long do they stay good, after bake, or can they be freeze and put directly to heated little toster ovens

    • Gemma Stafford on August 21, 2018 at 8:21 am

      Hi there,
      Any baked goods will need to be stored in an airtight container in a cool place. This one will work really well frozen, or refrigerated, and refreshed in a hot oven. Freezing will of course hold them a lot longer. I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Valerie on August 20, 2018 at 5:51 am

    One question how long they last fresh after baked and if so redhead how many days you would recommend keeping, or if it’s better to make and then bake

    • Gemma Stafford on August 22, 2018 at 4:59 am

      Hi Valerie,
      In France, where this is a go to daily pastry, these would never be eaten after the day of baking, certainly not in a cafe. This is true of their baguette too. Fresh is always best for this type of bake. You can refresh it in a hot oven too if you wish.
      Freeze excess, or place in a bag in the fridge, then pop into a hot oven to refresh.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  18. Shilpa Karnik on August 5, 2018 at 11:23 am

    Hi Gemma,

    Have just posted picture of my croissants that I baked today. They have turned out awesome, thanks for the amazing recipe.
    Though this is my 3rd attempt, this one was fool proof. I reduced the temperature to 240°c since I have a fan oven and it worked wonders….
    Thanks again

    • Gemma Stafford on August 6, 2018 at 4:15 am

      Thank you Shilpa, good job!
      Always worth a little practice with these recipes, it makes perfect,
      Gemma 🙂

  19. Jennie on August 4, 2018 at 11:31 pm

    Hi Gemma. This recipe looks wonderful and easy to do. However, I have some problem when making this. The first time, the whole process went smothly, there was no butter melted, the yeast was still active but they didn’t rise up. I let them sit in the fridge because of the hot weather, the average temp reaches to 30°C so I scared that the butter will be melted. Next time, I let them proof at room temp and I end up with croissant shaped breads in a butter bath. What should I do to solve the problem?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 5, 2018 at 2:21 am

      Hi Jennie,
      I am making the assumption that the butter was real dairy butter.
      There are a few things you can do to help here.
      1. you can allow the croissants to proof at room temperature until you see them begin to develop, then you can refrigerate for a period, and return to room temperature before you bake.
      2. You can use freezer packs, under the tray, to keep the temperature down.
      3. You can make at night, and pop into the fridge until morning, that should do it perfectly for you.
      I know this is a challenge, and humidity too causes problems for baking, summertime is lovely, but 30c is HOT HOT HOT!
      I feel your pain,
      Gemma 🙂

  20. Chandelle on July 29, 2018 at 9:34 pm

    Which kind of butter did you used? Unsalted? Salted?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 30, 2018 at 6:26 pm

      I used salted but it is up to you 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  21. Rose Quart on July 29, 2018 at 9:22 pm

    Is it okay to use al purpose flour instead of bread flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 30, 2018 at 6:31 pm

      Hi Rose,

      yes you can. just note that all purpose needles liquid so don’t add it all in at once. Careful as you go 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  22. Juniper on July 26, 2018 at 9:54 am

    hi! I wold like to make these but i do not have breed flower can i substitute?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 27, 2018 at 3:57 am

      Hi there,
      This recipe likes a strong flour/high protein/high gluten.
      You can try it with all purpose flour/plain flour. Check the pack in your store, pick the one with the highest protein content.
      Keep the second stage of the bake cool as you can, it should work well,
      Gemma 🙂

  23. Darcia on July 24, 2018 at 6:19 am

    Hi Gemma, I let my croissants sit 3 hours but they still looked like they hadn’t risen. The yeast was proofed when I started so does it get killed somehow through the process? The flavor was so delicious, the croissants were just so tiny.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 25, 2018 at 4:13 pm

      Hi Darcia,

      No the yeast doesn’t get killed until it goes into the oven and the heat kills it. I’m sorry to hear that. Can you check the date on your yeast?

      Also if they proofed early on in the process they really should have been fine once you rolled them.
      Best,
      Gemma.

  24. Mandy on June 6, 2018 at 2:54 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    I see that my croissant dough is not as smooth as yours in the video so I did a couple more folds. Is that okay?
    Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on June 9, 2018 at 4:57 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, you can fold this as many times as you like. All will be well. Finish and bake it, then you will have learned a lot,
      Gemma 🙂

  25. Anna on May 15, 2018 at 9:29 am

    Lovely recipe 🙂 but is it okay to leave out the egg wash? Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on May 15, 2018 at 9:43 am

      Sure Anna, you can leave off the egg wash.

      Best,
      Gemma.

      • Anna on May 15, 2018 at 2:54 pm

        Thank you.

  26. Anastasia2010 on May 6, 2018 at 2:03 am

    Hi again, I just commented as Anastasia and realized that I wasn’t logged in…. Anyway, so it is still me, your loyal follower forever!

    • Gemma Stafford on May 6, 2018 at 9:47 pm

      got it!!! 🙂

      Gemma.

  27. Anastasia on May 6, 2018 at 1:41 am

    Hi Gemma,

    I discovered your channel and website about a week ago and seeing how I am on vocation from work now, I spent the entire time baking and tried 15 of your recipes!!
    I tried your homemade Nutella, crazy dough (pizza, cheesy bread and Nutella braid), your microwave mug cakes, red velvet roll, red velvet giant oreo cookie (my personal favorite)

    Well suffice to say, my family are happy on their sugar high and so are my friends and neighbors 🙂

    This recipe is my latest achievement.

    Your collection of recipes is just food for my soul! It’s like you are in my head making all my dreams in cooking come true. Your recipes are easy to follow, fun to watch and amazingly delicious. Who could ask for more!

    Thank you, you are a true baking goddess

    • Gemma Stafford on May 7, 2018 at 4:44 am

      Hi Anastasia,
      Good to hear from you, and happy that oyu are enjoying your vacation, and baking.
      Baking is a mindful activity too, it is difficult to be worrying when you re focused on a recipe, and then there is the reward!
      Thank you for letting me know, I am happy to have you baking with us.
      Stay tuned, lots more to come!
      Gemma 😉

  28. Eli on May 1, 2018 at 9:33 am

    Dear Gemma,

    I made this recipe and for the first time it turned out great! I decided to make it for my friend at her house.
    For the second time I made this recipe with the exact ingredients except the flour!
    at the rolling section, the dough is not consistent…it falls apart and its not flexible enough so I cant roll it… I don’t know how to fix it. Can you please help me? What should I add to this dough to salvage it?
    right know I put it back to the fridge.

    Thank you so much in advance for helping me 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on May 2, 2018 at 4:38 am

      Hi Eli,
      You left out the important detail! What did you use for flour?
      Gemma 🙂

      • Eli on May 2, 2018 at 10:01 am

        Hi again!
        I realize that the flour was 1 year old and it smelled weird! I understand that the gluten is not working. (we are living in Canada – Quebec)
        .
        I added another flour to the dough (all purpose and from a new package). I don’t know what will happen next!
        I know it’s not croissant anymore, but I hope it is something worth eating! 🙂

        • Gemma Stafford on May 3, 2018 at 3:30 am

          Hi Eli,
          you make a very good point, flour goes off! do buy in quantities you can use reasonably quickly. I hope you have resolved this now, and that you managed to get an edible bread,
          Gemma 🙂

  29. Ufuoma on April 20, 2018 at 1:08 pm

    Hi Gemma! I looooove croissants and I hope to make them soon. Can I use baking margarine instead of butter which is very expensive where I live? Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on April 21, 2018 at 3:30 am

      Hi there,
      You can certainly do that, but it will not give the same result.
      I think it will work reasonably well for you, and you should try it, even a small sample bake to start.
      Do let me know what you discover. This type of margarine is widely used, successfully, around the world, so it is worth a try!
      Gemma 🙂

  30. Patricia on April 19, 2018 at 7:04 am

    My flour butter mix turned out to be soggy and I added more flour to fix it. Now the resulting dough ball is a bit soft. Should I put the dough in the fridge or freezer? I’m making it right now, so please please reply fast😥😥😥

    • Gemma Stafford on April 20, 2018 at 7:26 am

      Hi Patricia,
      I think our time zones got in the way here, I am sorry.
      It sounds like your dough was a little over wet. This happens really easily, very little extra liquid will change the dough, and the way to correct it is with extra flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, so always add the liquid, until your dough comes together in a clean ball, then stop!
      I think you have probably managed this by now, I really hope so. sorry I did not get to respond in time for you,
      Gemma 🙂

  31. Tracy on April 13, 2018 at 5:55 am

    Thank you for this awesome recipe! My son has a peanut allergy and cannot normally eat baked goods from stores. However we went on a family trip to Washington DC and there was a nut free bakery that made chocolate croissants. He fell in love but was also sad he could not have them again when we returned to NJ! I made this recipe for him and he was so excited to have chocolate croissants again! He absolutely loved them. I am making them again for his birthday.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 15, 2018 at 5:13 am

      Hi Tracy,
      Good job you! You clearly hit the spot with this recipe, well done.
      Food allergies are really hard on young people, and older people too, so it is great when you find something which works. I am happy to hear this,
      Gemma 🙂

  32. Aster on March 24, 2018 at 3:15 am

    Hello Gemma,
    What butter does this recipe calls for? Can I use salted butter? 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on March 24, 2018 at 3:18 am

      Hi Aster,
      YES! I tend to use salted butter most of the time as this is what I grew up with. all will be well,
      Gemma 🙂

  33. Mona on March 12, 2018 at 4:28 am

    hi
    I can substitute active yeast with instant yeast and in what quantity?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2018 at 6:32 am

      Hi Mona,
      Do you mean replace instant yeast with active dried? If so then you will need to sponge the yeast before adding to the flour.
      This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  34. Tri on March 3, 2018 at 7:56 pm

    Thank you Gemma for the recipe. I used 1cup whole wheat flour and 1/4 apf to substitute for strong bread flour , it came out well.

    • Gemma Stafford on March 5, 2018 at 4:29 am

      Hi there,
      Really? I am surprised that you got a good result with that mix, well done you,
      Gemma 🙂

  35. Fio on February 28, 2018 at 10:56 am

    Hello Gemma ! First I would like to THANK YOU for all the amazing recipes that you are sharing with us! Now, I tried to bake croissants, but in the dough i forgot to add yeast, i already folded the dough 3 times..now what can i use this dough for?? Thanks!!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 1, 2018 at 8:02 am

      Hi Fiona,
      Poor you! That is just the worst thing that can happen, and not possible to correct it.
      You really have now a laminated pastry. You can use it for pies, tarts, savory and sweet things.
      I hope this works for you. Look at the recipes here for some ideas: (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/?s=Pop+tarts).
      Gemma 🙂

      • Liza soberano on March 3, 2018 at 9:03 am

        Hi gemma!!
        What is the substitute for bread flour?
        Is it a wheat flour?

        • Gemma Stafford on March 5, 2018 at 5:46 am

          Hi there,
          Bread Flour/Strong Flour is a high gluten flour which contains about 13% protein, and it is, of course, best for bread.
          All purpose flour/plain white flour has a gluten content of about 11%. This depends on where, when and type grown.
          Pastry Flour/cream Flour is a finer, lower gluten kind of flour that is best suited for sweet baked goods like cakes and cookies. It has a very soft texture.
          Cake Flour is even finer and lower in gluten than pastry flour. It might be good for baked goods that need an especially soft and fluffy texture and do not need to withstand a long proofing process.
          Self-raising Flour already contains the raising agent. should just be left in the shelf where it stands. If you want great results in baking, learn how to use and measure your own yeast and baking powders.
          Whole wheat flour has gluten, but it is not as available as in white flour, because of the way it is milled. Many of the yeast recipes can also be used with whole wheat flour, and there are strong whole wheat flours developed for this purpose.
          Croissants really need a high gluten flour, so generall strong white flour for this, failing that plain/all purpose flour will do well enough.
          I hope this helps you,
          Gemma 😉

      • Fio on March 4, 2018 at 10:13 am

        Great..Thank you very much Gemma!!:)

  36. Neha Agnihotri on February 12, 2018 at 5:19 am

    Hi Gemma
    What is strong flour? Is it wheat flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 12, 2018 at 3:47 pm

      No ,it is bread flour. It has a higher gluten level then all purpose flour.

      P.S you can substitute wheat flour for strong flour.

  37. syed on February 4, 2018 at 2:37 am

    Hi gemma.
    I think I have made the dough too much wet..
    What should I do now?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 4, 2018 at 4:07 pm

      Put it in the fridge and let it rest. If you find it is still too wet after you try and roll it just add extra flour to the surface to help it roll.

      There is not much you can do once the liquid is in there.

      Good Luck,
      Gemma.

  38. Maria Isabel Correa on January 24, 2018 at 4:37 pm

    Hi! you mentioned in the video that yeast and flour can’t be combined, but the 2nd step you said: “In a large bowl add the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast and whisk to combine.” so, how long should I wait before whisking?

    Thank you!

    • Gemma Stafford on January 25, 2018 at 7:18 am

      Hi there,
      Do mean yeast directly on to salt? This is what will kill the yeast.
      Here is a little FYI about the types of yeast available and what to use.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  39. jenlapitan19 on January 22, 2018 at 10:43 pm

    Hi! Can i use APF instead of bread flour?
    Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2018 at 7:57 am

      Hi there,
      The higher the gluten the better for this bake. That is not to say that it will not work for you, just a little better with the stronger flour.
      Happy baking, let us see the results,
      Gemma 🙂

  40. Alexey B on January 14, 2018 at 11:47 am

    Hi Gemma, I’m looking forward towards making the croissants using the recipe. However, there’s one thing that bothers me: is it possible to make those without the convection oven (at all)? Because I don’t have one :(.

    Thank in advance,
    Alexey B.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 14, 2018 at 10:05 pm

      Hi Alexey,

      Do you have a fan oven? if so just use that. No problem. Bring the temp down 20 degrees for fan.

      Gemma.

  41. LILIAN on January 9, 2018 at 4:02 am

    Can I substitute bread flour with hi-gluten flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 9, 2018 at 9:15 am

      Hi Lilian,
      You can make these on a flat tray, and cut them into bars. Take a look around your kitchen, we often save plastic cartons which can be reused for all sorts of things. A butter carton would be good to use to make a bar, you need to be inventive!
      Gemma 🙂

  42. Rekha on January 6, 2018 at 11:45 pm

    Hi,

    I used the same technique as u said .. my while touching the floor dry yeast not activated .. i can feel the yeast while touching the dough.. not i put that in a fridge .. i am confused whether the yeast will active or not ..

    • Gemma Stafford on January 7, 2018 at 3:04 am

      Hi Rekha,
      This is a little explanation of yeast.
      Dry Yeast:It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      I am inclind to think that the yeast you used needed to be activated (sponged) in the liquids before adding to the dough. All is not lost however, it will activate if it is fresh, but it will need more time. The dough needs to be kept in a warm place to allow this to happen. Stick with it, I think it will work out. Next time activate it (sponge) it before you use it, this is also a way to ‘prove’ that the yeast is not dead.
      This is a learning curve, practice is an important part of learning,
      Gemma 🙂

  43. Firdaus on December 27, 2017 at 1:08 am

    Hey Gemma,I tried making the dough with the same quantities but after mixing in the milk the dough looked so sticky….should I continue with the same dough???

    • Gemma Stafford on December 27, 2017 at 2:35 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, you should add sufficient liquids to bring the dough together in a clean ball, then STOP!
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways. you can proof this one, then flour a board or table really heavily, tumble the dough out and allow it to pick up the flour it needs. All will be well,
      Gemma 🙂

  44. shaik firdose fatima on December 27, 2017 at 12:44 am

    and ca i put butter between d layers?

    • Gemma Stafford on December 27, 2017 at 2:37 am

      Hi there,
      Follow the recipe! Each step has a place in this, trust it!
      All purpose flour is a bit lower in gluten than strong/bread flour. You may ne get the same result, but it should work out quite well,
      Gemma 🙂

  45. shaik firdose fatima on December 27, 2017 at 12:43 am

    can i use all purpose flour?

  46. Hamsi on December 24, 2017 at 11:33 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Made this today and it came out really well. Thanks for such a wonderful and easy recipe.😊

    Thanks & Regards,
    Hamsini

    • Gemma Stafford on December 25, 2017 at 6:01 pm

      Hi,

      I’m thrilled to hear that! Thank you so much for your comment.

      Gemma.

  47. Chiqui on December 20, 2017 at 5:48 pm

    how come my croissant dough were soggy despite resting them on the fridge for a couple of hours before rolling again and again and when cooked they looked more like a bun…hahaha! i had the flakes and the layers but they dont really look like the way they should look 🙂 i used frozen salted butter (so i adjusted the salt) and mixed powdered food color on the flour (i experimented on two-toned croissant) have i experimented too much? (ha-ha!) on which process have i gone wrong? i seriously need rescuing on this! ha-ha!
    merry christmas!!!

    • Gemma Stafford on December 21, 2017 at 10:46 am

      Hi Chiqui,
      I think you over wet the dough! It takes very little to go from just right to too much.
      Flour in different places takes up liquids in different ways, depending on where, when how and type of wheat being milled.
      Add 3/4 of the liquids, then carefully until the dough comes together in a clean ball, then STOP!!
      Some breads love a wet dough, but not this one!
      Hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Chiqui on December 21, 2017 at 7:18 pm

        copy chef!!! thanks!

        • Gemma Stafford on December 22, 2017 at 12:47 pm

          Over and out, Gemma 🙂 🙂

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