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How to Make Condensed Milk: Easily make condensed milk at homemade with just milk and sugar. The result is the same as store bought.

How To Make Condensed Milk (Bold Baking Basics)

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Easily make my Homemade Sweetened Condensed Milk recipe and use it to create ice cream, cookies & more!


Hi Bold Bakers! 

Working as a professional chef, I have learned a lot of tips and tricks over the years. Now I’m going to share with you some Bold Baking Basics that will help you along your baking journey to make it fun and for you to improve your skills. I’m often asked, “Is there a substitute for sweetened condensed milk?” Well, did you know you can make Homemade Condensed Milk? That’s right, now you don’t just have to go to the store for it.

What is Condensed Milk?

Condensed milk is traditionally cow’s milk that has much of the water content boiled away and then sugar added. I use Sweetened Condensed Milk a lot in my baking. If you cannot find it in your country you can easily make it yourself at home. It is one of the main ingredients in my 2 ingredient No Machine Ice Cream. If you like your frozen desserts a little lighter and fruitier then try my Homemade Sorbet in 5 minutes (No Machine)

Can I Make Dairy Free Condensed Milk?

My condensed milk recipe contains milk, however if you are dairy free and/or like vegan baking I also have the exact same recipe but using coconut milk rather than dairy milk. It is just as easy to make and it tastes great too. Find my Dairy Free Condensed Milk recipe.You can also use Nut Milks and other sugars such as Truvia. See the Notes section in the recipe for more details.

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How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk

Simmering milk and sugar on a low, controlled heat will yield you a thick, syrupy milk. Once it cools it will thicken and be ready to use. It will last in the fridge for weeks if you don’t need it straight away.

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What is the Difference Between Condensed Milk and Evaporated Milk?

The biggest difference between condensed and evaporated milk is the sugar content. Both are made by reducing a percent of the water content from the milk but the condensed version has sugar added which is why it’s called Sweetened Condensed Milk.

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Use your homemade sweetened condensed milk to make:


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How to Make Condensed Milk: Easily make condensed milk at homemade with just milk and sugar. The result is the same as store bought.
How to Make Sweetened Condensed Milk (Bold Baking Basics)
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
40 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 

Easily make my Homemade Sweetened Condensed Milk recipe and use it to create my 2 ingredient ice cream, cookies & more!

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Servings: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 2 cups (16floz/450ml) full fat milk or low fat milk*
  • cups (5oz /142g) white sugar
Instructions
  1. Add the milk and sugar into a small, heavy bottomed saucepan.
  2. Heat it on a low heat until the sugar has dissolved.
  3. Once all of the sugar has dissolved bring the mix to a simmer over medium low heat. Do not stir once the mix starts to simmer otherwise it can crack and crystalize.
  4. Gently simmer for roughly 35-40 minutes, or until the milk has darkened to an almost grey color, has reduced by half and thickened slightly. You may notice some foam forming on top, gently skim it off with a spoon. (if there are sugary bits hanging around the rim of your pot don’t stir them into your condensed milk, this can also crack your mix)
  5. When ready, remove from the heat and pour into a jar to cool. Let the condensed milk cool completely before putting on the airtight lid. Just note, it thickens up alot after a few hours in the fridge.
  6. Store in a labeled jar in the fridge and it will last for 6 months.

Watch the Recipe Video!

Recipe Notes

The condensed milk when ready will measure 1 cup/8oz.

You can use any Nut Milk instead of Regular milk

You can use coconut sugar/maple syrup/light honey or other natural sugars instead of white sugar.
The substitute you use needs to be able to caramelize. stevia, xylitol, splenda will not caramelize so will not work in this recipe.

 

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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723 Comments

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  1. Helen O'Donnell on November 1, 2018 at 5:01 pm

    Hi Gemma. Not sure if many of your readers have a Thermomix, but I make it in that. Quicker and easier and never fails. Cheers and thx again for your basics – I make and use them all the time.
    Helen, Australia

    • Gemma Stafford on November 1, 2018 at 10:01 pm

      Oh interesting. I bet that will help someone out if they read this.

      Really glad you liked it, Helen.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  2. Ann on October 20, 2018 at 6:55 pm

    Hi
    Just read the fine print in this recipe, can swerve be used as a sugar sub,
    Regards
    Ann

    • Gemma Stafford on October 21, 2018 at 9:00 pm

      Hi Ann,

      Swerve will caramelize somewhat so yes it will work for condensed milk.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  3. MarilyneG on October 16, 2018 at 11:12 am

    Ma. Gemma: can I add more sugar to this recipe I need it to be more tick well to resemble the can condense milk I want to make flan and I noticed that thecondensed milk I made from your recipe is a bit thin, and my flan came out a little softer than usual and this is my go to recipe have been making it for years can’t think of anything I I made differently expect for the condensed milk. Anyway-
    Thank you for taking the time and posting all your wonderful recipes
    I also took your tutorial for home made ice cream on craftsy last year I see you have a nice recipe for ice cream here too. All in all thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 17, 2018 at 3:56 am

      Hi Marilyn,
      If you cook the condensed milk down a bit further it will thicken more. This is about evaporating the water content of the milk. Eventually it will turn to a caramel, which will be the final step for this recipe, though not what you want. I do not think more sugar is necessary, just a bit more time.
      Delighted to have you here with us, thank you for taking the CRAFTSY class, it was interesting to do!
      Gemma 🙂

  4. frances reiter on October 14, 2018 at 4:13 pm

    in one part of your recipe you say you can use stevia to make this, and in another you say you cannot. which is it?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 16, 2018 at 7:11 am

      Hi Frances,
      Good point! Technically right on both counts, but more correctly if oyu use stevia for sweetness for condensed milk you also need to use an alcohol sugar, such as erythritol/xylitol in order to get the condensed milk to caramelize/thicken.
      Condensed milk is a step no the way to a caramel. you are coming coming to this at a time when there are a number of great alternative sugars available. Here we use one called Lakanto, but there is Truvia, and Swerve, really all much the same thing, using either monk fruit or stevia for the sweetness, and an alcohol sugar such as erythritol or xylitol, which will caramelize, and behave like real sugar in a bake. Stevia and Monk fruit will not caramelize on their own, but will be great in drinks and some puddings/custards etc.
      I hope this helps, I am sorry to confuse, pressure of the moment!
      Gemma 🙂

  5. Sandra on October 14, 2018 at 11:42 am

    Dear Gemma,
    Can you make this in a pressure cooker?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 16, 2018 at 4:43 am

      Hi Sandra,
      NO! the reason for this is that you are evaporating the water content of the milk, then thickening the remainder with the sugar, a step on the way to a caramel. This is a slow and gentle process, a traditional way of preserving milk in the summer months, for winter use, in times when farming was different, more cyclical as it were.
      Thank you for this question though, it is a good one!
      Gemma 🙂

  6. Ruhma on October 14, 2018 at 11:36 am

    Hi Gemma,

    Whenever I make this, it ends up grainy and not smooth like yours in the video. I do make sure the sugar is fully dissolved. What could be the cause and how do I fix it?

    Thanks 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on October 16, 2018 at 4:35 am

      Hi Rhuma,
      Are you using fresh dairy milk? I am not sure how that is happening for you if the sugar is fully dissolved. This is a slow process, you have to take your time with it.
      Let me know,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Ruhma on October 22, 2018 at 1:16 pm

        Thanks for your reply 🙂 and yes, I use fresh dairy whole milk.

  7. ann peacock on October 10, 2018 at 12:50 pm

    Hi Gemma I love your recipes .I live in France and carn’t buy cottage cheese ,do you have a recipe that tastes really good.
    kind regards Ann

    • Gemma Stafford on October 11, 2018 at 4:42 am

      Hi Ann,
      May I say, Chanceux de vivre en France! I have loved any time I spent there over the years, we holidayed there as children with our parents.
      Really cottage cheese is the start of any cheese, the point at which the curd is formed. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/how-to-make-cream-cheese/). It is the same as this recipe. Lemon juice forms a smaller curd with low fat milk, and that is effectively cottage cheese/ricotta.
      The name ‘Cottage cheese’ comes from the home made nature of this back in the day, and was a way to preserve the milk. Continuing the process/aging then produces other styles of cheese.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Jason Cook on October 9, 2018 at 3:47 pm

    Hey thanks for the informative video. I followed this recipe using homemade coconut milk using shredded coconut.

    My question was why would my condensed coconut milk get too hard? It was like a hardened caramel at room temperature?

    I was trying to let simply let it cool down and it was sticking to pot.
    I tried mixing it into cocowhip to make a coconut milk ice cream but was too hard to mix. It would of worked if it didn’t get too hard. Thanks again. I can’t rate the recipe cause I might of just messed it up.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 13, 2018 at 8:16 pm

      Hi Jason,

      I’m really not sure what it would do that because the sugar when simmered just right is syrupy. Did it turn brown? it sounds like it might have reduced too much and made more of a caramel.

      What do you think?
      Gemma.

      • Jason Cook on October 13, 2018 at 10:46 pm

        Hey Gemma,

        I’m pretty sure your correct that would make sense. It did not turn brown. I cooked it down too long and it hardens at room temperature that makes sense. I didn’t put the timer on, just kept on eye on it till it thickened on a low simmer. I think setting the timer should make a huge difference with not cooking it down too long in my opinion. At any rate I’m going to try it again.

        • Gemma Stafford on October 14, 2018 at 12:43 pm

          Jason, do try again. Remember this is a traditional recipe, many families, in many geographical locations, make this as a matter of course in their kitchens. It is a regular thing for these families, like making pancakes for American families. It is a way to preserve milk in the bountiful season of summer, for the scarcer times of the winter. Dulce De Leche is the step too far, when the milk actually turns to a delicious caramel, a happy accident, no doubt!
          Take your time with it, it will not be rushed!
          Gemma 🙂

  9. Jodi Sproles on October 9, 2018 at 12:35 pm

    My first attempt was utter failure. I used a laser therometer to keep it from boiling this time. It turned out perfectly and tastes way better than canned, once it cools we are going to make your ice cream!!! We get whole raw milk and needed some recipes to use it up since we don’t drink it fast enough!!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 9, 2018 at 10:20 pm

      That’s a great tip Jodi. I’m delighted to hear you had success.

      Let me know how your ice cream turns out 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  10. Cheryl Hargett on October 8, 2018 at 12:55 pm

    How is it safe to skim the foam off the surface, but you cannot stir once the sugar has dissolved?? Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 9, 2018 at 2:19 am

      Hi Cheryl,
      The skimming of the foam is not a necessary thing, but it will not be the same as stirring it. The issue for any caramel is that it may split/crystalize, and it is best to avoid this where possible. Condensed milk is a step on the way to a caramel, like the soft ball stage as it were.
      Some people would say it is ok to stir this, but it is risky!
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Teresa on October 1, 2018 at 5:49 pm

    Hi Gemma

    I tried your recipe today but my concoction would not cake up nor thicken. It is quite liquidity even now hours after I made it this morning..I used regular organic milk and sugar cane.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 1, 2018 at 7:43 pm

      Hi Teresa,

      Have you put it in the fridge yet? it thickens up when it gets cold from being in the fridge.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

      • Teresa on October 1, 2018 at 8:22 pm

        Hi Gemma

        Thanks for your reply. I did try putting it into the fridge.

        Then a few hours ago after reading some of the comments, I tried to simmer it again on the stove and it did reduce a bit the liquid amount. I will put it in the refrigerator and just see how it goes.

        • Gemma Stafford on October 2, 2018 at 2:19 am

          Good Teresa, Remember this is a traditional recipe, routinely made in homes around the world as a means of preserving the summer milk. It is a matter of practice and confidence. Good for you to persevere,
          Gemma 🙂

  12. Audrey Perozzi on September 30, 2018 at 6:09 am

    Hey Gemma,

    My nieces and I do monthly baking sessions and I try and teach them techniques in the kitchen. We often use your recipes for inspiration.

    I was thinking this would be a fun project for us to do, but am curious if we could pair out with a canning lesson… And can them in Mason jars to gift people. Thoughts?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 1, 2018 at 6:19 am

      Hi Audrey,
      Sure you can, and what a wonderful lesson that will be.
      The sterilization of the jars is so important for the whole canning thing, and that in itself is of value for all sorts of things.
      Condensed milk/evaporated milk were designed to preserve milk for winter months in times when cows did not produce milk, it is what was done. Store then in a cool place.
      Great idea, thank you for telling us about it,
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Caron on September 28, 2018 at 8:56 am

    Could you also continue to cook it over low heat for a long period of time to then make dulce de leche?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 30, 2018 at 8:03 pm

      Yes Carson, you can. Here is my recipe for dulce de leche

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  14. john hryniw on September 15, 2018 at 10:07 am

    your recipes look amazing.

    this recipe seems to make about 1 cup but the ice cream recipe calls for close to 2 cups of sweetened condensed milk – so I was wondering if there’s a way to make them match (or am I missing something simple – lol)?

    thanks for your help.

    a reader from Canada.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 16, 2018 at 5:37 am

      Hi John,
      Good question. When you condense milk you do two things:
      1. you reduce/evaporate the water content of the milk by about 40%.
      2. you thicken the milk by the process of caramelizing the sugar, to the soft ball stage or thereabouts.
      The sugar will become liquid too, so adds to the volume (140g or so) and the milk should reduce to about 180g, which should give you a yield of 320g.
      So, you would need about 3 cups of milk etc to get a yield of about 450g. You may have a little over to use for another baking purpose.
      My math is not my best skill John, you may make something different of this, but I thin kit is close enough,
      Gemma 🙂

  15. Latviya on September 14, 2018 at 6:00 am

    Hi Gemma,
    Instead of sugar does can we use honey ?
    Regards,

    • Gemma Stafford on September 15, 2018 at 3:42 am

      Hi there,
      sure you can. you can use any sugar, and honey is a sugar, which will caramelize. The flavor will of course change as it condenses, so choose a mild liquid honey. Agave will work too, or the new ags sweeteners like Lakanto/swerve/Truvia.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  16. Hesti on September 10, 2018 at 10:09 pm

    Hi, i would like to ask, while simmering, should we stir continously or not ?
    Thanks for the answer

    • Gemma Stafford on September 11, 2018 at 5:07 am

      Hi Hesti,
      I do not stir this after the sugar has dissolved. This is a general rule for caramel, though some people would stir a condensed milk and not have a problem. I prefer to allow it to simmer away, and keep an eye on it, it helps to prevent it splitting,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Jessica C on September 9, 2018 at 5:28 am

    Just made the SCM with half coconut sugar and half sucralose. I’m not sure what happened but it looks like my milk completely separated into curds and whey. Any ideas on what when wrong and how to avoid it next time?

    Trying to make the SCM recipe to use for a healthier alternative to store bought coffee creamer.

    Thanks for your help

    • Gemma Stafford on September 9, 2018 at 2:26 pm

      Hi Jessica,

      The reason it separated is because unfortunately it simmered for just a tiny bit too long. This happens. Next time just simmer for less.
      I hope you make it work.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  18. Brittney on September 7, 2018 at 3:27 pm

    In one portion you say we can use Truvia and in another, you state we cannot. Which is it? Also, if I have to use honey, how much honey should I use?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 10, 2018 at 5:52 am

      Hi Brittney,
      I hardly ever name a brand in a video, though we do use Lakanto here in some recipes, especially low carb ones.
      What matters here is that whatever you use in a condensed milk most have the ability to caramelize.Truvia will do this. Truvia is a blend of stevia for sweetness, and an alcohol sugar, erythritol which allows it to behave like regular sugar in a recipe. The alcohol sugars are derived from grains or fruits, nut as dangerous as they sound. You are safe to use Truvia in any and all your baking, it will be good.
      stevia on its’ own is perhaps what I mentioned, as this will not work in condensed milk.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  19. Fizzah on August 24, 2018 at 7:02 am

    1 cup of sugar is equal to how much condensed milk?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 7:43 am

      Hi there,
      Condensed milk is about 40% sugar. That means that one cup of condensed milk will be equal to about 1/2 cup of sugar.
      Remember to adjust other liquids in a recipe if using a large amount of the condensed milk, it will not matter for smaller quantities.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  20. Patrick Karen Macalintal on August 22, 2018 at 5:25 am

    Hi Gemma!
    I tried making this with water-buffalo milk but I think I took it out too soon because it’s still runny. Can I still put it back in the stove even after I put it in the fridge? Thank you so much!

    • Gemma Stafford on August 23, 2018 at 7:34 am

      Hi Patrick,
      It is useful to understand what you are trying to do. To condense a milk you need the sugar, and it has to be a sugar which will caramelize.
      Think about it like this, when you make a caramel from water it goes through a number of stages, the sugar and water stage, the sugar dissolves, then a little boiling to make it syrupy which is a ‘simple syrup’, the soft ball stage when it has not colored but it is thick enough to form a soft ball if dropped into cold water, and eventually the caramel, when it colors.
      This is exactly what happens with condensed milk, take it too far and it is Dulce De Leche, too soon and it will not thicken up. So, yes, you can return it to the pan, and keep it going to reduce the water content, and it will thicken up, it has to!
      I hope this is of help to you, it is a common question,
      Gemma 🙂

  21. Rony on August 22, 2018 at 1:10 am

    Hi Emma ..
    can I use milk powder instead of fresh milk in making condensed milk ?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 22, 2018 at 1:45 am

      Hi Rony,
      Yes! think about it like this, condensed milk is a step on the way to a caramel, like a Dulce De Leche. Before a caramel turns caramel colored it thickens as the water content evaporates. So you can really thicken any milk in this way, or water! When you take water to this stage it is at the SOFT BALL stage of a caramel, or close to a simple sugar syrup, very useful for all sorts of things!
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

  22. Paige on August 15, 2018 at 10:44 pm

    I was wondering if this recipe would work with Monkfruit 1:1 Sugar Substitute? Some say monk fruit sweetener is much sweeter than the white sugar. The recipe calls for 2/3 cup of sugar, should it be cut back if the monk fruit sweetener could be used?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 16, 2018 at 2:58 am

      Hi Paige,
      Stevia and monk fruit sweeteners come in many forms. The difficulty is as you say, it is super sweet, and it cannot be used in the same way as sugar, unless the bulk is replaced in a recipe. The new age sweeteners, such as swerve/truvia/Lakanto (Lakanto is a monk fruit extract combined with an alcohol sugar called erythritol), are designed to provide the bulk and balance the sweetness to be more like sugar.
      The real difficulty you have is that monk fruit will not condense the milk as it does not caramelize on its own. Combining it with an alcohol sugar changes that, which is why the branded ones are emerging. Check out Lakanto here (https://amzn.to/2vj4Uih) or the other brands too, it is informative,
      Gemma 🙂

  23. paul mercy on August 14, 2018 at 8:39 am

    can one make the cream used for ice cream at home?what if i cant find the cream in my country?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 14, 2018 at 4:45 pm

      Hi Paul,
      The cream which I use for most of my recipes is fresh dairy cream. This needs to be at least 35% fat content to whip well. This is from cows milk. It is a liquid product found in the chill cabinet in your store. It will spoil in a few days, even when refrigerated. It has no additives, it is just natural cream, skimmed from milk.
      In some places, where there is no dairy industry, there are manufactured products, usually made with milk powders and fats. These are good for some applications, but they are not fresh cream. I am sorry, it cannot be actually made!
      Gemma 🙂

  24. Steph Norris on August 14, 2018 at 7:40 am

    Hi, just wondering if you have tried this with rice milk and a sugar substitute? 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on August 14, 2018 at 4:48 pm

      Hi Steph,
      You can condense any milk really, but it need a sugar which will caramelize.
      The new age sweeteners will do this, truvia/swerve will do it without adding calories, agave/honey/maple syrup will do it too but these are high in fructose.
      Take a look at this one (https://amzn.to/2vj4Uih) we like it here at BBB.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  25. Angela on August 13, 2018 at 12:29 pm

    Can heavy whipping cream be used?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 13, 2018 at 8:55 pm

      unfortunately no, you need to use milk for this recipe.

      best,
      Gemma.

  26. Jake on August 12, 2018 at 11:36 am

    Hi Gemma, managed to make some chocolate fudge condensed milk (cow’s milk) and yielded a very thick result; although I wouldn’t say it made my homemade ice cream much more chocolatey, maybe because a fair bit of chocolate was left in the pan during the process, and “boiled out” so to speak, but definitely thickened and softened my ice cream. 🙂
    I’l have to try making dulce de leche sometime, looks like a heart… I mean showstopper.:)

    • Gemma Stafford on August 14, 2018 at 5:39 am

      Hi Jake,
      good for you, a great experiment too.
      Haha! yes, a show stopper, and very delicious, we all love caramel flavored ice cream,
      Gemma 🙂

  27. ashamilantj on August 12, 2018 at 10:26 am

    Thank you, this is the first time I am making condensed milk, I don’t know if I had made it properly, but I love it, I gave it to my elder one, she loved it, thanks a lot

    • Gemma Stafford on August 15, 2018 at 8:03 am

      Good!
      I am really happy to hear this, thank you so much for letting us know,
      Gemma 🙂

  28. Soledad on August 10, 2018 at 3:50 pm

    Hi. I’m a latin housewife who was reading this ,and in here condensed milk by the can it was use (in the 80’s)to make Manjar or Dulce de leche, as the other countries call it. How? You heat up a pot with water big enough to cover (always) the condensed milk can, without labels, then boil it for 50 minutes, take the can out , let it be completely cool down, and then open it. Voilà ,you got express Dulce de leche or MANJAR.
    You also can do it with just milk and sugar until is brown,but its all about measurements of ingredients an the diameter of the pot too (I never got it just right)

    • Gemma Stafford on August 11, 2018 at 3:01 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, and we discuss this method here on the Dulce De Leche post.
      This is a treasure from the Latin American countries, and there are others. Churros for instance, Brigadeiro, from Brazil and many more which I have not been lucky enough to try. You can give us ideas, and recipes too, which you think may suit other Bold Bakers! we will be delighted,
      Gemma 🙂

  29. Erin on August 10, 2018 at 2:02 pm

    Can I use Agave as a sugar subsitute when making condensed milk?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 11, 2018 at 3:08 am

      Hi Erin,
      Yes! You can use any sugar which will caramelize. Many of the new age sweeteners will do this for you too.
      Stevia/monk sugar on their own will not caramelize, but these are being combined with sugar alcohols now to allow them to be used in all recipes. Erythritol is an example of a sugar alcohol, you can look it up, and there are others too.
      Condensed milk is a step on the way to a caramel, as in Dulce De Leche, it needs to caramelize slightly to thicken.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  30. Jake on August 9, 2018 at 12:05 pm

    Hi Gemma, I have successfully made this with soya milk too and was wondering, is it possible to make condensed milk with chocolate fudge flavoured milk? This might give it a thicker, more fudgey consistency perhaps?

    Thank you 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on August 10, 2018 at 2:42 am

      Hi Jake,
      Ha! I do not know if this will work. It will reduce, and if it has the sugar it will condense, but I am not too sure what will happen to the flavor.
      (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/dulce-de-leche/) would this recipe give you the idea? I think that wil lwork well with soy too, though I did not try it. You can add the cocoa to this too, I think, would need to try it! If you try it, tell al of us about it.
      Gemma 🙂

  31. Anuja Aiyappan on August 8, 2018 at 12:00 am

    Hi Gemma,
    Instead of sugar does can we use jaggery?
    Regards,
    Anuja

    • Gemma Stafford on August 9, 2018 at 7:03 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, sugar is raw sugar, should be brown in color, and pretty delicious!
      Gemma 😉

  32. Ning on August 7, 2018 at 9:27 pm

    Hi Ms. Gemma,

    Do we need to cover tha pan while simmering?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 8, 2018 at 9:45 am

      Hi, no you can leave it uncovered 🙂

  33. KathyM on August 4, 2018 at 12:57 pm

    Hi Gemma, I love that your site shows us how to make so many things from scratch! I made the wonderful ice cream with SCD, but even though it hard 10 ml less in the recipe (our cans in Canada are slightly smaller than in the US), I still find the ice cream a bit sweeter than I prefer. Would it be okay if I used a bit less sugar, or is it important to keep this ratio for some reason? Can’t wait to try it!

    • Gemma Stafford on August 5, 2018 at 4:02 am

      Hi Kathy,
      The milk will not condense without the sugar, it is a step on the way to a caramel, Dulce De Leche. The sugars thicken the milk.
      You can add a touch more cream, or use the flavorings to balance the sweetness. Unsweetened cocoa, a good espresso coffee powder, sharp fruit coulis etc.
      Try this one (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/tiramisu-ice-cream/). It will tolerate more cream!
      Gemma 🙂

  34. Micaelis on August 2, 2018 at 3:47 pm

    Hi Gemma

    Been making this twice now, and even after overnight in the ref it’s still liquid.
    What am I possibly doing wrong?
    Also would it be okay to try put it back to simmer some more after overnight in the ref?

    Michael

    • Gemma Stafford on August 3, 2018 at 2:42 am

      Hi Michael,
      Yes! I think you took it off too soon. A good way to know when it is right is to measure the evaporation, it should be about 60% reduced, the milk is on the way to being caramelized. I always have a ruler in my kitchen things, for all sorts of things. Make sure it is clean and use it to measure the depth of the milk in the pan at the start, and use a wide pan too, the larger the surface area of the milk, the quicker the evaporation.
      Then you can see the reduction in the water level in the milk.
      I hope this is of help, when you get it right one time, you will get it right always!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Cheryl Hargett on October 8, 2018 at 12:46 pm

        BRILLIANT!

  35. Patrick Karen Macalintal on August 2, 2018 at 6:00 am

    Hi Gemma,

    I love watching your videos especially those ones that you can modify. I have a question, I am lactose intolerant and I love to bake and eat sweets. I recently found a natural store that sell water-buffalo milk, can I use that instead to make condensed milk?

    Thank you very much!
    Karen

    • Gemma Stafford on August 2, 2018 at 1:00 pm

      Hi there,
      yes! this will condense readily. Caraboa milk, the milk of water buffalo is a really rich, and very nutritious. It will behave as cows milk and should be delicious, try it!
      Gemma 🙂

  36. April on July 29, 2018 at 7:46 pm

    I have 2 gallons of milk i need to cook down… already made queso fresco.
    We are lactose intolerant but have found that if i cook the milk it does not affect us the same as simply drinking or consuming prior to any cooking. Coukd you also do this with lactose free milk?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 30, 2018 at 7:37 pm

      Hi April,

      yes you can make this recipe with lactose free milk like say, nut or coconut. I have a recipe for it

      Best,
      Gemma.

      • Ayisha on November 5, 2018 at 9:58 pm

        Hi Gemma. We have a lactose intolerant person in our household and in my country, there is a company that sells a line of milk(s) and one of them is lactose-free. For economic reasons, it’s easier for us to buy this. Would you suggest I use it to make the condensed milk as I see above you reference “nut or coconut”? If it’s allowed, I’ve added a link to show you the milk I’m talking about.

        • Gemma Stafford on November 6, 2018 at 3:02 am

          Hi Ayisha,
          Yes! you can use this milk. any milk will condense, it is really a type of caramelized milk, which is thickening as a result of evaporation, and the changes taking place in the sugars.
          I removed the link, but I saw it, and that will work perfectly for you.
          good to have you with us,
          Gemma 🙂

  37. Nana Osei-Tutu on July 28, 2018 at 4:29 am

    That jar that you poured the milk into at the end of the video, where did you get it?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 28, 2018 at 8:39 am

      Hi there,
      I cannot remember where I got it, I have had it for a long time, but I think it was a local store.
      You will find similar in any housewares store, I think.
      thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  38. Melissa on July 25, 2018 at 10:30 am

    So do you still live in Ireland? I was wondering because usually countries such as those dont use a bunch of additives and crap to their food and meat. Unlike our dreadful country of usa. You said it will last in fridge for weeks. Is that with store bought crap milk? Cuz i get fresh farm milk. Usually goes sour within a week. So i am not sure if it will last that long? Also do you have a video on how to make golden syrup, cottage cheese or ricotta cheese? Ive never actually had or used ricotta in anything but people claim its better then cottage cheese which i always use in my lasagna. By the way i love your accent. Same with Anne Reardon with how to cook that. Both ya have great videos. You should share some real good irish recipes. A good bread recipe would be great. Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 25, 2018 at 4:39 pm

      Hi Melissa,

      I actually live in Los Angeles. The reason it keeps is because you have cooked it and it is almost a caramel. It’s no longer just milk.

      I have a recipe for cream cheese you should check out.

      Really glad you like my videos.
      Best,
      Gemma.

  39. Kabir Sebastian Orlowski on July 24, 2018 at 11:44 pm

    Hi, I’m thinking of trying to make my own condescend milk because I live in Thailand, so 1) there’s no real condensed milk available here – but everyone uses cheap substitute which is palm oil based, and 2) Thailand is about to ban all trans-fats (woe to vegan bakers – margarine is about to become illegal!). My question is, how do you turn homemade sweetened condensed milk into Dulce de leche (usually I’d boil a can of SCM for several hours). Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on July 25, 2018 at 4:40 pm

      Hi,

      You would continue to cook it for longer to get ducal de leche. You should check out my recipe on how to make it

      Best,
      Gemma.

  40. Kye on July 24, 2018 at 12:22 pm

    HI, Gemma! I was wondering if the Condensed Milk was ready to use as soon as it cooled, or if I would need to wait a few hours for it to cool? Thanks for the recipe!!

    • Gemma Stafford on July 25, 2018 at 4:14 pm

      Yes Key, once it is completely cold and has thickened it is ready to use.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  41. Diana Warren on July 22, 2018 at 9:01 am

    How to store in the fridge in what and for how long please , Thank you sweetie. Love 💖 your recipes

    • Gemma Stafford on July 23, 2018 at 3:21 am

      Hi Diana,
      Thank you for your kind words.
      in the past, when milk was seasonal, condensed milk was a way to preserve milk, for the cold days of winter. Then the milk would have been stored, in sterile jars, well sealed, in a cold place for months. refrigeration has changed how we do things. if properly preserved the milk should keep well for months. In the refrigerator, in a sealed sterile jar I suggest a few weeks, especially if you are using it as you go.
      good to have you with is,
      Gemma 🙂

  42. Chinwendu on July 19, 2018 at 11:04 am

    Hey Gemma,
    In your video you said that condensed milk has to be used in the ice cream because it is liquid sugar. Does this technically mean that I could use honey instead?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 20, 2018 at 11:37 am

      Haha! NO!,
      This is certainly a liquid sugar, but it is way more than that. It really is a milk, which is on the way to a caramel. this gives richness and texture, and low water content. Honey can be used to condense milk too, but the flavor of the honey is enhanced.
      I would not do what you are suggesting, it will be WRONG! Good question though, your logic is right.
      Gemma 😉

  43. Bluecowgirldani on July 18, 2018 at 6:53 pm

    Why should we not put the lids on right away??? I would think it would have a canning effect so it would last longer with the lids

    • Gemma Stafford on July 18, 2018 at 9:22 pm

      I have never seen the need to. It stays perfectly fine and fresh.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  44. LoriLoud on July 12, 2018 at 1:23 pm

    Hi, in the article you say this can be made with stevia and then in the notes you say it cannot, because it does not caramelize. What sweetener do you recommend? I can use almond milk and a sweetener, as I am on a very low carb diet.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 13, 2018 at 2:27 am

      Hi Lori,
      You are right, I am sorry, I did not notice this, I will edit it right away.
      Almond milk will condense nicely, but do it really gently, simmer means just that, nice and slow.
      I think Truvia will do it for you. Truvia is actually not just Stevia but mostly erythritol, an alcohol sugar, which gives the bulk needed for baking and allows it to caramelize, and stevia, which will not caramelize on its own. There is a website for Truvia, and it is worth a visit. I am not an expert in this area, but there is a lot of information out there. I think finding one, which will work in all of your baking/drinks etc is the answer, and Truvia may be just that!
      Gemma 🙂

  45. Barbara on July 11, 2018 at 6:56 pm

    Gemma: Thanks for the recipe, I did not have condensed milk on hand in the pantry, used your recipe it worked perfectly. After it cooled made your Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream. Cannot wait to taste the ice cream. Thanks for all your recipes that you share with your followers. Have a great day!

    • Gemma Stafford on July 11, 2018 at 11:33 pm

      I’m delighted to hear that you like it!! Thanks for letting me know.

      Gemma 🙂

  46. Julie12 on July 8, 2018 at 2:22 am

    Can I double this recipe?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 8, 2018 at 2:23 pm

      Yes you can Julie, just note it will take 10-15 minutes longer to cook 🙂

      Gemma.

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