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Traditional Irish Soda Bread (Brown Bread)- My Mammies recipe for brown bread. This whole wheat bread is nutritious and fast to make.

Traditional Irish Soda Bread (Brown Bread)

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Hi Bold Bakers!

In Ireland, we are extremely fortunate to have access to some of the best produce in the world, from butter, eggs, oats and much more. I was very lucky to have an incredible Mammy who showed me how to cook. She made everything from scratch every day. For a family of seven that’s pretty incredible. 

My mum says one of the greatest gifts you can give a child is to teach them how to cook. This is one of the main reasons why I’m here today. With my mum’s permission, I’m allowed to share her recipe for Traditional Irish Soda Bread with you. 

Traditional Irish Soda Bread has a particular look, but do you know what it is? The marking on top is a cross. It comes from blessing the bread before baking. Also you poke a hole in each corner of the loaf to release the fairies that can curse your bread if not released. 

A few notes about Buttermilk : Buttermilk is a must in this recipe and can’t be left out. The main reason is the buttermilk chemically reacts with the baking soda to make the bread rise. The buttermilk adds lovely flavor to your bread. Some people worry about tasting the acid buttermilk but once it’s bake you can’t taste it at all. If you can’t buy buttermilk, the next best things is you can make it. My Buttermilk recipe is below in the notes of the bread recipe.

Tips for a perfect loaf of Soda Bread: Start out by mixing your bread dough in a large bowl so you have space to mix your dough, which will reduce the chances of you over-mixing and toughening your bread. 

Always level your teaspoon of baking soda before adding it to your ingredients. There are two very good reasons for this that can make or break your bread: 1): Too much baking soda will tint your bread green! Seriously, it gives your bread a greenish hue on the inside. Worse than that; 2) Too much baking soda can give your bread a very acidic taste which can be quite unpleasant, so remember less is more with the baking soda. 

For the whole wheat flour, I like to keep mine fresh in the freezer because I don’t use it as often as white flour. The oils in the flour can turn rancid over time so just freeze it and use it when you’re in need.

For a beautiful, crispy crust refrain from opening the door while baking. I know how tempting it is but believe me your bread won’t burn. It’s not going anywhere and it will be worth it when you take out a beautiful loaf of bread with a thick crust.

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Traditional Irish Soda Bread is made in homes everyday all over Ireland. It has a beautiful crust, a close crumb and a lovely wheat flavor.

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Irish Soda Bread doesn’t require yeast and no resting so it is incredibly fast to whip up. And the faster you make it the better the bread will be. It is what’s considered a quick bread.

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4.6 from 19 reviews
Traditional Irish Soda Bread (Brown Bread)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
  • 1¾ cups (265g/ 9oz) whole wheat flour (fine or coarsely ground)
  • 1¾ cups (265g/9oz) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 tablespoons (30g/1oz) butter, cold
  • 1 egg
  • 1⅔ cups (400ml) buttermilk*
  • 1 tablespoons oats
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (215°C).
  2. Mix together the flours, salt, and baking soda in a large bowl. Add the butter and rub into the flour mixture with your fingertips until it resembles bread crumbs.
  3. In a separate jug, whisk the egg and buttermilk together (see note on how to make Buttermilk below)
  4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour the liquid into the flour mixture.
  5. Using an open hand bring the flour and liquid together to a loose dough. The dough should be quite soft, but not too sticky.
  6. Turn onto a floured work surface and gently bring the dough together into a round about 1½ inches (4cm) thick (8 inches by 8 inches) .
  7. Place on a baking sheet dusted well with flour
  8. Score the bread by blessing it with a deep cross on top. Poke a hole in the 4 corners of the bread to release the fairies and stop them from cursing your beautiful bread.
  9. Glaze the bread with the leftover bit of buttermilk in your jug and dust the top with rolled oats.
  10. Bake for 15 minutes, then turn down the oven to 400°F (200°C) and bake for 30 minutes more. When done, the loaf will sound slightly hollow when tapped on the bottom. Remove from the baking sheet and place on a wire rack to cool.
Notes
6 SmarPoints
5 PointsPlus Points

*For every Cup of Buttermilk needed mix 1 cup of regular milk with 2 tablespoons of Lemon juice or white vinegar. Mix and let it stand for a minimum of 30 minutes before using.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 8 servings Calories: 183 Fat: 4g Saturated fat: 2g Unsaturated fat: 0g Trans fat: 0g Carbohydrates: 28g Sugar: 3g Sodium: 583mg Fiber: 2g Protein: 7g Cholesterol: 33mg

 

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Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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SUBMIT YOUR OWN PHOTOS OF THIS RECIPE

19 Images
Submit Your Photos
Lydia
Charltonclan
jippolit
Suhaila Qari
Erica Dormuth
Hannah Phillips
Angelikamariaantonia
Angelikamariaantonia
Shehwar Jalali
Meghan_h
Bipasyana
Belle Simmons
accyan
Tum Wilson
Bakingat40
Vallery
Wes Gordon
Wes Gordon
Vallery

169 Comments

  1. Joan Carey-Jones on March 10, 2016 at 9:41 am

    What about the raisins?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2016 at 4:18 pm

      Thanks so much for the heads up! Check the recipe now, we’ve fixed it 🙂

      • phyllis on March 11, 2016 at 10:58 am

        pulled up the recipe for the irish soda bread and i don’t see the addition of the raisins to the recipe.

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 12:26 pm

          Hi Phyllis,
          Ah! you are talking about a white soda bread which was known as ‘spotted dick’. This was made with white flour, with one ounce of sugar and a handful of dried fruit added. It was a great tea-time treat for us when we were kids, loaded with butter and jam. Otherwise the measurements were the same. I should write this up!
          Gemma 🙂

    • Logan Wong on March 17, 2016 at 9:36 am

      Will the Bread be OK it I wrap it up in cling-film and leave it over night

      • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 3:06 pm

        Hi Logan,
        When it is baked it will hold well for one day, it does not hold so well over a long period. It also toast beautifully!
        Gemma 🙂

  2. Nirmala on March 10, 2016 at 9:43 am

    Can the buttermilk stay fresh if i make it in the night to use in the morning?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2016 at 4:20 pm

      Yes, be sure to keep it in the fridge. Hope this helps 🙂

  3. Norma on March 10, 2016 at 10:01 am

    Looks good. Will try. Brown bread good for diabetic. Thanks Gemma

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2016 at 4:21 pm

      Thanks so much for visiting my website, Norma. Delighted you liked this recipe 🙂

  4. Martha on March 10, 2016 at 10:22 am

    That’s a lovely rich recipe, with both egg and butter. I usually just use an egg. In a pinch, you can thin plain yogurt with milk to the consistency of buttermilk, and use that instead. So glad we can find Kerry Gold butter here in the states! Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2016 at 4:23 pm

      Thanks for the tips, Martha! Really glad you liked this recipe 🙂

  5. yiqi on March 10, 2016 at 12:46 pm

    Hi Gemma, I wanted to ask, if you could make this recipe vegan? Like could I leave the egg out or substitute it with sth? It looks great though!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2016 at 4:32 pm

      Thanks so much for your comment. Check out this website for great egg substitute ideas http://chefinyou.com/articles/egg-substitutes-cooking/. Hope this helps 🙂

    • Sarita on March 19, 2016 at 3:36 pm

      You can definitely make this recipe vegan! Buttermilk is easily made vegan by combining 1 tsp lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to every 1 cup of non-dairy milk. No egg would be necessary if you do this. I hope this helps anyone out there. Also for the butter, there are vegan butters you can use too, just take in consideration that it’s not the same as the real thing. The consistency is very oily, I would recommend to use half the of the vegan butter of what this recipe uses (1 tablespoon). 🙂

      • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 20, 2016 at 4:35 am

        Hi Sarita,
        Thank you for this. I do have a lot of followers who are vegan, and this is not my area of speciality, so I appreciate your input,
        Gemma 🙂

      • Profile photo of Ravijot Kaur Ravijot Kaur on December 26, 2016 at 4:10 am

        Hi Sarita,

        I always make it a point to read the comments before posting a question, and here is the reply to my query about this recipe! I am not a vegan, but do bake only eggless. and wanted to know what to do if i do not want to add in an egg, and here is the answer… Thank you! 🙂

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on December 26, 2016 at 6:39 am

          Thank oyu for your help, yes, this bread can easily be made without egg, traditionally it would not have had egg added.
          Gemma 🙂

  6. Susan Reedy on March 10, 2016 at 5:54 pm

    Just made this yummy bread. I always thought I didn’t like Irish Soda Bread, but I guess I never had the right one! So easy and delicious! Definitely going to be making this again…probably in the morning. Quick question, is it supposed to be more like a scone or biscuit type consistency vs. traditional bread? Dense is maybe the right word…If that makes any sense. Thanks Gemma and thanks to your mom!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 1:22 pm

      Hi Susan,
      Yes, dense is the right word. As you get used to making it you will lighten your touch, so my Mum would heat the oven, then mix in a few seconds, then into the oven. Once the soda is wet it begins to activate, so you do not leave it around when wet. Happy baking,
      Gemma 🙂

  7. Ann on March 10, 2016 at 7:24 pm

    I always forget to comment on the website but I’m always on YouTube!! Haha. One question. Besides soup what else can you eat Irish soda bread with? 🙂
    Plus I found the history behind this bread super interesting! Thanks for that 🙂 hehe

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 1:12 pm

      Hi Ann, we had this with cheese,cold meats, boiled eggs, butter, jam, and as a side with salads. This really is still a staple in Irish homes,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Emer McCloy on March 11, 2016 at 12:27 am

    Gemma,
    And sure aren’t ya a gem. Passing your recipes on to me American friends.
    Of note..I’ve never added any egg. Just for those that are sensitive. Lovely recipe all the same.
    As My Mammy used to say “you just need a quick hand and a hot oven”
    Maith an Cailin …your recipes are marvellous

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks Emer, and you Mammy is right, sure aren’t they always right? lol,
      Gemma 🙂

  9. Emer McCloy on March 11, 2016 at 12:34 am

    Great recipe from not only a traditional Irish girl handing out great common sense recipes but also has many amazing innovative recipes for every cook.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 1:05 pm

      Hi Emer, you are so kind, thank you! I am happy to have you with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. George on March 11, 2016 at 10:04 am

    This looks so healthy and delicious! 😀 Though I wonder if oat flour would work as a substitute of whole wheat

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2016 at 12:35 pm

      Hi George,
      I do not know, but I do know that my Mum used to add a handful of oats to this recipe sometimes. I think the gluten is relevant to the rise here, so I doubt the result somehow. Perhaps a combination of Spelt flour and oat would be ok,I need to focus more on this area this year,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Shani on March 11, 2016 at 1:28 pm

    Soup and bread for dinner tonight…
    Ps
    I love the music in the “Irish” videos so much

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 4:06 am

      Hi Shani,
      That is a great combination, can be dessert too with a little jam, which I love!
      Gemma 🙂

  12. Mary on March 11, 2016 at 6:16 pm

    would like email newsletter

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 12:58 pm

      Thanks so much for visiting my website. You can sign up for the weekly newsletter on the homepage of my website. Let me know if you have trouble finding it. 🙂

  13. Cat on March 11, 2016 at 6:22 pm

    I’ve been waiting for you to post a soda bread recipe! I’ve tried many of your recipes and they never fail – always amazing! I have this in the oven right now! I’m going to make another one to bring to a St. Patrick’s Day party soon!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 4:02 am

      Hi Cat,
      I am really happy to hear that. It is so handy as all you need to have to hand are the ingredients, and every time you make it it will be better than the time before. A light touch with soda bread is the secret,
      Gemma 🙂

  14. niko on March 11, 2016 at 9:23 pm

    Great recipe gemma?? your videos always inspire us than u gemma

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 3:54 am

      🙂 🙂

  15. niko on March 11, 2016 at 9:24 pm

    Thank u * gemma
    🙂

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 3:54 am

      Hi Niko,
      You are welcome,
      Gemma 🙂

  16. Diana on March 11, 2016 at 10:10 pm

    Hey, can i sub the wholewheat flour for only plain flour? also, im so confused as to how the bread has the proper gluten structure without even kneading the dough!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 3:42 am

      Hi Diana,
      This bread does not rely in the gluten, as there is no yeast. In fact developing the gluten is exactly what you do not want, as it will toughen the dough.
      This is why you move quickly, light hands make the best soda bread. Also have the oven ready for the bread as soon as it is made.
      Yes you can make a white soda bread, we usually would have this as a sweet bread, with the addition of a little sugar and raisins, a bit like a scone dough.
      You can also have it as a savory dough, adding herbs, sharp cheddar, curry spices or what ever you like. Have fun with it,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Rach's Recipes on March 12, 2016 at 12:24 am

    This was so good and easy to make. I also used a Kitchenaid Stand Up mixer and it made mixing everything so much more efficient – took just about 10 minutes! Thanks for sharing.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2016 at 3:29 am

      Hi Rach,
      I am glad this worked for you. As you can imagine there were not mixers available in the old days when this was developed, just hard working hands!
      It is important not to over-mix this as the gluten will develop and toughen the bread. You probably know how to handle it in the mixer, so it does make it quick and easy, good job!
      Gemma 🙂

  18. Taammy boyer on March 12, 2016 at 5:24 am

    can you suppsitute the buttermilk for 2% milk

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 4:35 am

      Hi Taammy,
      Yes you can, but you will need to add a little vinegar/lemon juice to slightly sour it. Th is to allow for the activation of the bread soda, and give a good rise. Add about 1 teaspoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to 1 pint of milk, and allow to stand for about 30 mins.
      Gemma 🙂

  19. Janice on March 12, 2016 at 6:04 am

    Hi Gemma,
    Just wondering which oven mode do you usually use for baking? (both cakes and bread)
    Conventional heat or fan mode?
    Thanks a lot, I really like your recipes!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 4:32 am

      Hi Janice,
      I tend to use the conventional mode, if your oven temperature is reliable this is perfect for all baking.
      My Mum tends to use the fan, but she is always in a hurry lol!
      Gemma 🙂

  20. Rae on March 12, 2016 at 12:29 pm

    Hello! Thanks for the lovely recipe! 🙂
    Though I was wondering if this bread could be baked in a bread pan instead? Would it make a difference?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 4:24 am

      Hi Rae,
      Yes, it can. My Mum had another recipe where she used 3/4 wholemeal, 1/4 plain flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, salt, and a scatter of oatmeal, sunflower seeds or what is to hand, mixed quickly to a soft dough and put straight into a well buttered bread pan. It is slightly rougher, but delicious too. Have the oven ready as the soda activates as soon as it is wet,
      Gemma 🙂

  21. theresa on March 12, 2016 at 12:39 pm

    Made this fab bread today.hubby who loves his brown bread was very impressed.thank you

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 4:20 am

      Hi Theresa,
      Thank you for your kind words, and for being in touch, I am happy you enjoyed this recipe,
      Gemma 🙂

  22. Nancy on March 12, 2016 at 5:43 pm

    I made your irish bread today with some delicious soup! Your bread was excellent!! I know I will be making it again & again!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 4:13 am

      Hi Nancy, and I bet your soup was delicious too, perfect combination. Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  23. Andrew Walters on March 12, 2016 at 9:25 pm

    Your mother is fortunate to have a daughter who is preserving and proliferating her recipes!

    Made it this morning, it’s all gone now. Second loaf is in the oven for tomorrow. Very easy, very tasty and useful loaf, and I love your glazing trick that saves cracking another egg! This recipe is going to be a staple at our house.

    But I’m till hoping you’ll do some yeast breads! I love making and eating yeast breads. I’ve been making all our family’s bread for about a year, but I’m certain I’ll learn a lot when you get around to doing some of these.

    I can’t wait to see what you’re going to do on the 17th!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2016 at 3:48 am

      Hi Andrew,
      Yes, I know my Mum is proud to see me doing what she taught me. This is a great reliable loaf, and you can add other nutrients to it too, such as seeds, nuts etc. did you try the no knead bread recipe on my website? this is easy beyond all, and also a very delicious bread, almost like a sourdough texture.
      Thank you for being in touch, stay tuned for lots more,
      Gemma 🙂

  24. Lan on March 13, 2016 at 9:53 am

    Hi Gemma,

    Thanks for the recipe. I’ve got a question about storing whole wheat flour. If I freeze the remain, how should I defrost it? Simply take it out of the freezer and leave it at room temperature for a while? Will it get lumpy?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 14, 2016 at 3:31 am

      Hi Lan,
      The flour will not freeze hard as it does not have a high moisture content. So, take it out, weight out what you need, and return the bag to the freezer.
      Gemma 🙂

  25. Jack Parker on March 13, 2016 at 2:00 pm

    Hello, it’s “Isaiah55:6” from YouTube. I said I’d make this recipe and I did. It came out perfectly and looked just like your’s. (I used the same flour ratios.) Delicious with clotted cream and jam! I also enjoy it made from the denser, course wheat flour, too. It’s the perfect accompaniment to a lighter meal because even a smaller piece fills you up! Next time, I’m going to try exchanging (very untraditionally) half of the white flour with ground flax or sesame seeds to add a bit of nuttiness to it, and top with sunflower seeds.

    You mentioned you’d like to see a picture of it but I’m not sure how to show it to you. Maybe if you created a way for subscribers to upload pictures of your recipes that they made, it might encourage more website traffic? Maybe your sponsors could sponsor an occasional giveaway to subscribers who do upload pictures of your recipes? That would encourage more people to get involved and actually try your recipes, instead of just watching your videos. Just a thought from the marketer in me!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 14, 2016 at 3:23 am

      Thank you Jack for your contribution.
      Yes, his bread will take a fair bit of addition, my Mum used to add all sorts of things, nuts, seeds, pinhead oatmeal, raisins, and even cheese and herbs!
      Many of my followers also follow me on Facebook, there they find it easier to post photos of their results, through messenger, or in comments. It is more difficult on the website as you would need to be able to access the dashboard, and chaos may ensue!
      The suggestion re sponsors is valid, and we are constantly looking for more engagement, so thank you for that,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Jack Parker on March 14, 2016 at 4:19 am

        Ahhh… I didn’t think about Facebook. The only social media I’m involved with is YouTube and I only joined that so I could collect sermons I enjoy. I’ve never had Facebook or anything else. I tend to live very, very simply. I don’t own a TV, radio, stereo, CDs, DVD, video games, etc., I’ve never owned a microwave. (I’ve used my neighbor’s to try a few of your mug recipes though!) I still make all of my bread and butter by hand every week. I’ve always done everything from scratch and by hand. (Even making my own laundry soap and cleaning supplies.) And my phone can only call people. I guess it’s a Dumb Phone! Living simply is all I’ve ever known and I’ve never been tempted to leave the 19th century!

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:50 pm

          Hi Jack,
          Good for you! If that is working for you, do not be tempted to change it, there are times when I wish I were in the 19th century too!
          Gemma 🙂

  26. Sarah on March 13, 2016 at 7:10 pm

    Hi Gemma, I made the original recipe and it turned out fantastic. Nice and soft on the inside. I am making it again today but added raisins this time. Hope it turns out well. Such a fantastic recipe. Will definitely be making it for years to come. My irish mammy loves it. xx

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 14, 2016 at 3:01 am

      Hi Sarah,
      You certainly have a great Irish name, my junior school principal was Mr Barrett! a nice man too.
      Yes, you rock this up as you like. My Mum added seeds, nuts, raisins, honey, cheese and herbs, as the mood took her, and to meet her need. It will tolerate a lot of change, just do not over-handle,
      Gemma 🙂 Hello to your Irish Mammy too.

  27. Darlene on March 14, 2016 at 10:02 am

    Very easy bread to make and delicious. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:48 pm

      Hi Darlene,
      Thank you so much for your kind comments,
      Gemma 🙂

  28. Rachel on March 14, 2016 at 6:29 pm

    Gemma, my dough was far wetter than yours and just became a sticky, gooey mess. I’ve made various breads for 12+ years and I followed the recipe exactly so I don’t know where I went wrong; I certainly did not overwork it and all my ingredients were pretty fresh. It looked so simple too, and no one else here appears to have had issues. :/ I was able to salvage the dough by making drop biscuits, and the flavor is fantastic. I will try it again another day, but have you any ideas what I can do in future?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:47 pm

      Ah Rachel, I am so sorry to hear this. Generally this recipe is almost foolproof, but sometimes a different flour can make a difference. So, next time add half of the liquid at once, then feel your way with the rest until you get a firm, sticky, but not wet dough.
      If it goes over again tumble it into a loaf pan and bake it like that, this will work too,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Rachel on March 16, 2016 at 8:41 pm

        Thanks, Gemma! This answer was super helpful. <3

  29. Arti Yadav on March 15, 2016 at 2:21 am

    Hi Gemma. I love making breads and also tried your cup recipes which were delicious and everyone loved it. I will surely try this too.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:44 pm

      Hi Arti,
      I am really happy to hear that,
      Gemma 🙂

  30. Wendy on March 15, 2016 at 3:18 am

    Can’t seem to find baking soda in uk. Have bicarbonate of soda, baking powder but no baking soda. Is there a substitute? Thx- love your recipes!!!!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:44 pm

      Hi Wendy,
      across the water in Ireland we call Bicarbonate of soda baking soda, I always forget that this is not a common term, thank you for being in touch. I hope you enjoy making this bread,
      Gemma 🙂

  31. Ana on March 15, 2016 at 7:42 am

    I just tried it and it’s easy and delicious!!!!!! Thanks for the recipe ? ! I’ll be making this Irish soda bread again soon !
    Best regards from Colombia

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:42 pm

      Good Ana,
      I am happy to hear that,
      Gemma 🙂

  32. Caituy on March 15, 2016 at 1:14 pm

    Gemma,

    Can I add raisins to this recipe?

    Thanks!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:29 pm

      Hi Caituy,
      Yes you can, and nuts, seeds, honey anything you can think of!
      My Mum used to add cheese and herbs sometimes if we were serving this with cold cuts and salad,
      Gemma 🙂

  33. Donja McGuire on March 16, 2016 at 11:47 am

    Thank you for sharing this recipe! It’s going to be a very special Saint Patrick’s Day for us here in the McGuire house as we celebrate our Irish roots with yummy Irish food! I think this bread will be the icing on the cake and I can see this being a regular in our home through out the year! Love your videos and I always get great feedback after serving your dishes!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 16, 2016 at 2:00 pm

      Ah! thank you Donja, with a really good old Irish name I bet you are celebrating St Patrick’s day, I am happy that my Mammy’s bread will be on the menue,
      Gemma 🙂

  34. Vikkitoria on March 16, 2016 at 9:03 pm

    Hi Gemma! Can use only plain flour for this recipe? Just in case I don’t have any whole wheat flour around.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 1:02 pm

      Sure, that will work too. Thanks so much for watching 🙂

  35. Laura on March 17, 2016 at 3:20 am

    Do we use unsalted butter or salted butter for this recipe?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 3:09 pm

      Hi Laura,
      In Ireland all butter was salted! We have to look for unsalted butter for baking. for this recipe salted, and if you have unsalted butter add an extra pinch of salt,
      Gemma 🙂

  36. Dana on March 17, 2016 at 8:56 am

    Hi Gemma,
    thank you for this recipe and also for the other recipes, they’re yum! I’d like to try this out but we have some family members who are lactose intolerant, so we try to use lactose free milk and yoghurt etc. My question is, would this work with lactose free milk?

    Thank you,
    Dana

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 3:07 pm

      Hi Dana,
      I did not try this, but I think it would. Try it out with 1/4 measurements he next time you are baking,
      Gemma 🙂

  37. Sue Yates on March 17, 2016 at 11:54 am

    Hi Gemma. I made this bread today, St. Patricks Day, for the first time. It was delicious. I definitely will make it again. Going to try to a Mugnut tomorrow! Thank you

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2016 at 2:56 pm

      Hi Sue,
      Great, I am happy to hear that,
      Gemma 🙂

  38. arzu on March 19, 2016 at 11:16 pm

    Hi there, I Love your youtube channel. Learned so many things thanks to you. But sometimes I have problem with finding the best ingredients. I live I Holland and right now I have problem finding all purpose flour. I didn’t know how important flour was before this recipe. Can I combine whole wheat flour with another flour such as spelt flour or can I just use only whole wheat flour? I would love to hear your ideas. It seems that Holland doesn’t have all purpose flour. thank you

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 20, 2016 at 4:15 am

      Hi Arzu,
      All purpose flour is the US name for white wheat flour, which has not had raising agents added.
      In Ireland we call it Plain flour, or Cream flour, just to confuse us more!
      Spelt is an ancient form of wheat, and the plain version of this should be perfect as a substitute, it is also more nutritious!
      Mixed with wholemeal it will be perfect, we do this at home sometimes too,
      Gemma 🙂

  39. Maria on March 20, 2016 at 3:28 pm

    I just made and ate some. Delicious!! I am not a baker so, if i can make it, anyone can. 🙂

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 21, 2016 at 2:54 am

      Hi Maria,
      Well, now you are a baker!
      This was the staple of every home in Ireland back in the day, which was not too long ago! So everyone was able to produce their own version, I never had two that were the same, somehow,
      Gemma 🙂

  40. Hanna on March 21, 2016 at 3:57 am

    Hi Gemma
    Just baked it and it tastes delicious.
    I love to eat it with some butter and dutch cheese.
    I’m so happy that i don’t have to kneed the dough.
    thanks for sharing.
    A note for Arzu,
    All purpose flower is gewoon bloem of tarwe bloem, te koop in iedere supermarkt maar het lekkerst van de molen.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 22, 2016 at 3:25 am

      Hi Hanna,
      Thank you for your kind comments. This bread is delicious with cheese, and can have seeds or nuts added too to make it more nutritious.
      Thank you for helping with the flour thing!
      Gemma 🙂

  41. Kate on March 23, 2016 at 10:25 am

    Looks great! Would I be able to divide the recipe in two and make two small loaves? If so, how long would they need to cook?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 24, 2016 at 6:41 pm

      Hi Kate,
      Yes you would, they will be a little quicker, but not a lot as this is a dense enough bread, it will be about 10 mins shorter cooking time. What my Mum used to do was to bake this in one loaf then break it into the quarters described by the cross, this worked too!
      Gemma :

  42. Julie on March 24, 2016 at 9:42 am

    Could you possibly do a banana bread recipe?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on March 24, 2016 at 5:59 pm

      Hi Julie,
      I do have a really good banana bread here on my website, just pop it into the search bar,
      Gemma 🙂

  43. Eanna on April 2, 2016 at 6:31 am

    What a phenomenal recipe! This Irish soda bread is gorgeous- by far the best one I’ve tasted! Such a great texture and perfect with some Irish cheese and Ballymaloe relish! I used wholemeal spelt flour as I had that on hand and it worked out absolutely fine. Also, I had some buttermilk/egg mixture left which was perfect for glazing some scones with. Thanks for all the fab recipes Gemma and thanks to your Mum for this one too!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 2, 2016 at 7:15 am

      Hi Eanna,
      Thank you for your lovely comments, I am so happy that you found this recipe useful, and that you were able to adapt it. That is what it is all about.
      I will tell my Mum, she is a great fan of Ballymaloe relish too!
      I will take the 5 stars too, thank you!
      Gemma 🙂

  44. Eanna on April 2, 2016 at 6:34 am

    Just to say – meant to put 5 stars on my comment but my phone wouldn’t let me!

  45. Lisa M. Smith on April 3, 2016 at 3:35 pm

    I made this bread and accidentally only added the cup of homemade buttermilk and then checked the recipe because the dough looked like pie crust dough, then as the dough sat made the other 2/3 C buttermilk, and the bread was kind of wet on the outside, so I just cut the cross and sprinkled the oat, and viola, it was still perfect! 😀 I added two Tbs sugar and 3/4 cup cranberries, and will add two Tbs of caraway seeds next time since I forgot and got flustered. this was a very forgiving dough and bread. Thank you so much for the amazing recipe, we love it! <3

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 4, 2016 at 9:13 am

      Hi Lisa,
      Yes, this is a forgiving dough, and likes to be wet! It would have been made by everyone in Ireland as their main bread back in the day, and is still made and eaten a lot in Ireland,
      Gemma 🙂

  46. Lan on April 6, 2016 at 2:19 am

    Hi Gemma,

    I gave the recipe a try today. Sadly, my dough turned out so much wetter than yours. 🙁 Can a-wee-bit-cooler-than-room-temp buttermilk be the reason for this? Because everything else is exactly as the recipe. I know things are supposed to be at room temp and you’re probably rolling your eyes reading this but it’s pretty hot and humid where I live and I’m afraid of living milk outside for too long.

    I also want to ask if there is any way to fix a wet dough like mine.

    I decided to pop the dough in the oven anyway. Let’s see how it turn out to be.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 6, 2016 at 6:48 am

      Hi Lan,
      Yes, if you pop this dough into a loaf tin it will bake perfectly well at 200 degrees for about 40 mins.
      Next time adjust the quantity of the buttermilk, this can be down to the type of flour you use, some absorb liquids differently,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Lan on April 14, 2016 at 10:11 am

        Hi Gemma,

        Sorry for the late followup. I baked my dough on a tray. I didn’t have any loaf tin that was big enough for it. It was in the oven for 45 mins and came out great! Heavy, cruchy on the outside, soft on the inside. I have an Irish friend and he said the taste, smell and texture were right. Whee~ such a forgiving dough! Next time I’ll pour the buttermilk in more slowly and adjust the amount. Thanks for the recipe!

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 16, 2016 at 1:54 pm

          Hi Lan,
          Thank you for letting me know, I am happy that your Irish friend was happy too, Win Win i say lol!
          Gemma 🙂

  47. Arman on April 9, 2016 at 5:07 am

    Hi Gemma, just wondering about the quantity of buttermilk used. In the video, minute 2.46 I can see that the amount of buttermilk is lower than 400 ml while in the written recipe it is stated there 400 ml. Im afraid my dough will be wet with 400 ml of buttermilk.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 10, 2016 at 4:18 am

      Hi Arman,
      This dough is meant to be ‘soft’, the uptake of the liquid depends on the flour you use, so add 300 ml, check it, it must not be dry, when you turn it out of the mixing bowl on to a floured surface, you handle it really lightly, so a soft dough will be easily handled, a wet dough will not. If you think it is too wet bake it in a buttered loaf tin,
      Gemma 🙂

  48. neha on April 30, 2016 at 5:17 pm

    Hi gemma
    hw much sugar should b added if v want little sweetness.plz in measurement s n.also d raisins .thanx

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on May 1, 2016 at 12:16 pm

      hi Neha,
      Just about a tablespoon of brown sugar will add sweetness to this recipe. my Mum would say a ‘scatter’ of raisins, which I think is about one ounce. I hope you enjoy making this easy bread, handle it lightly,
      Gemma 🙂

  49. Danny McLaughlin on May 2, 2016 at 12:10 am

    Thanks for the tip about why the best might go green. We’re mysteriously having that probltm right now – seems self raising flour formulation has changed perhaps?

    No need for buttermilk in our view. 100 yrs of family baking Donegal style, now into at least the fourth generation here in London uses regular full-fat or semi-skimmed with perfect results. Our only ingredients are milk, flour, baking powder and salt. I suspect that poverty limited the ingredients back in the old times and that continued over here to London in 50s.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on May 2, 2016 at 8:22 am

      Hi Danny,
      Well that is great! Traditionally it was sour milk in my family, with baking soda (bicarb) and plain flour/wholemeal flour.
      Milk in the old days soured, now it goes bad and cannot be used in baking, hence the buttermilk. The rest is science!
      Nice to know you are carrying on the family tradition too 🙂
      Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  50. Alice on May 7, 2016 at 6:46 pm

    Hi Gemma! I made the bread and it turned out wonderfully! One question, the dough seemed a little on the dry sid. I did not add any extra milk as I like to follow the directions exactly when baking something for the first time. Is the dough typically on the drier side?
    Thanks!
    Alice

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford on May 9, 2016 at 3:40 pm

      Thanks for your question, Alice. If your dough seems too dry, feel free to add a little bit more liquid as you go. Hope this helps 🙂

  51. Debbie on May 14, 2016 at 7:25 am

    I’m just starting to make breads and this one looked uncomplicated so I figured I give it a shot. 1st attempt disaster. 2nd time is now in the oven and looking good. You just make this look so easy. Just so you know my next attempt will be your scones. I’m of Irish decent but not a lot of exposure to the culture. Learning something new every day 🙂

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on May 16, 2016 at 1:48 pm

      Hi Debbie,
      We will make a Cailin out of you yet!
      This bread was such a staple in Ireland, yeast was either not generally available, or simply not traditional, but every family had their own soda bread recipe. Maybe this was your family one too? hope the scones work out for you too,
      Gemma 🙂

  52. Chitrangi Verma on June 8, 2016 at 3:36 am

    Hi Gemma,
    I have been following your channel on YouTube for quite some time now and i simply love every recipe even though I haven’t tried them all. You really keep me motivated even though I suck at cooking or baking 😛 but I never give up.
    I just wanted to thank you for sharing all the amazing recipes and wish you good luck for the good work you’re doing.
    Thanks a ton to you and your mother 🙂
    Chitrangi

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on June 9, 2016 at 3:17 am

      Hi Chitrangi,
      Thank you for your kind comments, and for being in touch. I will pass on your thanks to my Mum too, she will be delighted. Keep at the baking, it is a skill which improves greatly with practice, and practice involves some disasters, this is how you will learn,
      Gemma 🙂

  53. Monisha on June 11, 2016 at 11:42 pm

    Hello Gemma!
    I tried this recipe today. The bread was nice and crispy on the outside and when I tapped the bottom,it sounded hollow as it should but the bread inside was doughy and dense. The same thing happened for an another recipe that I tried previously. I’d like to know where I’m going wrong.
    I’m a big fan, btw =D

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on June 12, 2016 at 1:38 am

      Hi Monisha,
      It sounds like you are using the wrong oven temperature. This dough should go straight into the hot oven as soon as it is ready, otherwise the raising agent will activate and the bread will fail. The dough needs to be soft. The rise starts immediately, and you will find that the inside will bake almost before the loaf browns. So, I think you may have an oven temperature issue, somehow, especially if this has happened with other recipes,
      Gemma 🙂

  54. Profile photo of Aidan Berry Aidan Berry on July 7, 2016 at 5:54 pm

    What a great recipe! I have made this several times and my family loves it when we smother it with homemade jam and Irish butter!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on July 8, 2016 at 2:31 am

      Hi Aidan,
      This is a great quick standby for teatime, it sounds like you have that down!
      Berry is a great Wexford name, which is where I come from in Ireland, perhaps you know that?
      Gemma 🙂

  55. Profile photo of Janie13 Janie13 on July 27, 2016 at 4:12 am

    Hi Gemma! I wonder if I can substitute the plain flour and only use whole wheat flour!? And do I need more baking soda then? Greetings from bread-nation germany 😀

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on July 28, 2016 at 4:19 am

      Hi Janie,
      This bread will need a little white flour, or another ‘flour’ to lighten it, or it will be too dense.
      450g coarse wholemeal flour
      50g rolled oats
      1 tsp salt
      1 level tsp bicarbonate of soda
      1 tbsp treacle
      1 egg
      450ml buttermilk (or sour milk)
      If I am making this recipe I use a loaf tin as it will be a wetter mixture, and it needs to be. So, pour into a buttered loaf tin and bake for about 45 mins at 220 degrees.
      Try this!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Profile photo of Janie13 Janie13 on July 28, 2016 at 11:13 am

        Thank you!!! It’s very delicious 😀

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on July 28, 2016 at 11:24 am

          That is so good to hear, Gemma 🙂

  56. Profile photo of jippolit jippolit on August 11, 2016 at 7:54 am

    This bread came out wonderful!

    We had to make a slight adjustment for altitude and/or flour moisture–a little less buttermilk or a little more flour. Otherwise, delicious.

    The fares were released well into the air in our kitchen here in Costa Rica! Wonderful aroma!!!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on August 11, 2016 at 10:17 am

      Hi there,
      that is great, i forgot about the altitude! I need to gen up on the mysteries of high altitude baking!
      Gemma 🙂

  57. Kathy on August 29, 2016 at 9:41 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Is it ok if I use 2% or 1% milk to make the buttermilk?

    Thanks!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on August 30, 2016 at 2:07 am

      Hi Kathy,
      You can choose, I usually use 2% for most purposes at home,
      Gemma 🙂

  58. Fabiana on September 21, 2016 at 12:26 pm

    I made this bread and it turned out amazing!!!! I never had Irish Soda bread before, and I love it!!!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on September 22, 2016 at 1:17 am

      That is great, it is such a quick and simple bread – great with soups, salads etc, and delicious with jam! 🙂

  59. Tina on September 27, 2016 at 8:07 am

    Hi.
    I like ur Irish bread recipe. I want to try it but can I use any thing else except egg. Plz suggest.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on September 27, 2016 at 10:57 pm

      Hi Tina,

      Gladd you like it. You can just leave out the egg. Also incase you haven’t already seen it, for your future baking use my handy egg substitute chart 🙂

  60. Harry Edwards on October 20, 2016 at 5:25 pm

    Gemma, thank you so much for sharing your mother’s recipe. A few friends and I are gonna have a movie marathon tomorrow and u wanted to do some prep for it. Can I make the dough tonight and bake it in the morning?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on October 21, 2016 at 1:46 am

      Hi Harry, NO! do not do this as the raising agent begins to activate as soon as it is wet, and they will not rise so well. Prepare all of the dry ingredients in a plastic bag in the fridge, then just add the wet ingredients just before baking, this is what my Mum does too! 🙂

      • Harry Edwards on October 21, 2016 at 8:41 am

        Gemma,

        Thank you.. This by far was the most amazing bread I’ve had.. Along with this and some fresh Irish tea and cranberry salad yummy… Thank you again.

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on October 22, 2016 at 1:21 am

          Yum is right Harry! I am heading to the kitchen right now, lol. Gemma 🙂

  61. Profile photo of Aidan Berry Aidan Berry on November 2, 2016 at 5:10 pm

    I love this recipe! I make this all the time and my irish grandparents LOVED it!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on November 3, 2016 at 2:55 am

      Hi Aidan, I am happy to hear that. Your name Berry, is a common name in Wexford where I came from. A name associated with traditional music, and horses!
      It is good to have you with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  62. Ila Sarwaye on November 4, 2016 at 10:46 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    I tried to make this bread whole wheat, andbaked it for a little longer, but the bread has turned out very lumpy. What should I do to fix it?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on November 5, 2016 at 3:55 am

      Did you follow the recipe? I am not clear about what you did, if you are saying you used all whole wheat flour, this will be a different result. Recipes are designed to be balanced. If I were using all whole wheat, I would use a different method. That will be 3/4 lb whole wheat flour, 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon treacle, or honey, 1/2 pint of buttermilk (more if needed) an a tablespoon of yogurt. Mix all of the ingredients together, transfer to a loaf pan and bake at 220 degrees for about 30 mins. This is a sticky dough, add more milk if it is too dry. 🙂

  63. Jennifer Vaughan on January 17, 2017 at 11:06 am

    Currently as I’m typing this my loaf is baking in the oven. I am 18 years old and this is the first from-scratch bread that I am making on my own. I’m so excited to see how it turns out. I saw the recipe on YouTube yesterday and I thought it looked easy enough so I decided to give it a go. It also made me happy inside and reminded me of my slight Irish heritage. I hope I like it and can re-create it on St. Patrick’s day!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on January 18, 2017 at 9:05 am

      Hi Jennifer, well done you! yes, it is difficult to extract the Irish out of people! we are everywhere 🙂
      I am happy that you tried this recipe, it is a good easy recipe, a little practice wil perfect it for you.
      St Patricks day is coming up fast, you will be the star of the show!
      Gemma 🙂

  64. Rebecca on February 11, 2017 at 2:41 pm

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. This is so easy and beautiful! I just made it for he first time to go with some soup. I cut off a test piece, with some cream cheese and jam, and it is so good! It was tempting to send you a picture, but it smelled to good not to try.

    I love the fact that your mother has shared this with all of us. The way you describe your mother while you were growing up is exactly how I want to be as a mother. These recipes make a beautiful legacy to pass along and you are a wonderful daughter to honor that legacy. I bet you would be just like her if you choose to become a mom.

    Anyway, I just wanted to tell you how much I appreciate your channel. You are inspiring me to bake more.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on February 13, 2017 at 9:06 am

      Hi Rebecca,
      That is so kind of you, thank you for your kind words.
      I am here in Ireland with my family right now, so I will be doing another video with my Mum soon.
      We were lucky, a happy busy household when I was a child, and great parents too, it does not get much better than that!
      I am happy that you tried the soda bread recipe, it is such a traditional one here in Ireland,
      Gemma 🙂

  65. hania on March 2, 2017 at 8:52 am

    hi gemma! hope u are good .i just love your recipes..just wanted to knoow that can this bread be made in a loaf tin and in microwave

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 3, 2017 at 11:58 am

      Hi Hania,
      NO! this recipe needs a really hot oven, a microwave will not do it!
      A loaf pan will work in a hot oven though, it is a good idea,
      Gemma 🙂

      • hania on March 6, 2017 at 1:38 am

        thank you so much..

        • hania on March 6, 2017 at 1:43 am

          I just read an above comment of yours that you are in Ireland…i realyy urge you to do a live with your mom..or a do a recipe video with her…..i am really a big fan of her too..

          • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 7, 2017 at 9:20 am

            Hania, I think you were looking in my window in Ireland, I did indeed do a video with my Mum, I talked her into it! We will be showing you this one soon.
            I will tell her that she has a fan, she will be delighted, thank you,
            Gemma 🙂



  66. Profile photo of Belle Simmons Belle Simmons on March 8, 2017 at 10:50 pm

    Hi, Gemma! I just want to thank you for the recipe. My husband and I visited Ireland last year and ever since our return he’d been craving Irish soda bread. We tried it in numerous restaurants and I tried several recipes and he was always disappointed…until now. You’ve definitely helped to bring a taste of Ireland here for the rest of us to enjoy. We owe you a great thanks.

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 10, 2017 at 5:22 am

      Hi Belle,
      I am really happy to hear that, thank you. I hope we were good to you and your husband in Ireland. I was home in February, and hope to return in June sometime. There is no place like home! though California feels like home to me too now!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Profile photo of Belle Simmons Belle Simmons on March 10, 2017 at 6:46 pm

        The Irish are one of the most lovely and generous people we’ve met in our travels. So heartwarming! Many thanks to you and your Mammy! 🙂

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2017 at 3:35 am

          Thank you Bella, i am happy to hear that. I will pass on your compliments to my ‘Mammy’lol,
          Gemma 🙂

  67. Tony millis on March 10, 2017 at 12:07 pm

    Because first time try, measured ingreadiants carefully, before cooking looked perfect. However, disaster! did not rise at all ? Will try again. By the way i am 89 and my mother must be laughing. she was head cook in a convent in Dublin when she was fifteen ! . I remember her making soda bread nearly every day when i was a lad .

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2017 at 4:44 am

      Hi Tony,
      Imagine your mother cooking in a convent at aged 15! how times have changed, this would be called slave labor now, and I suppose that is what is was.
      I am happy to have you with us. I am wondering if you left this bread around after it was mixed, and before baking? The soda will be spent if not popped into the oven right away. Work quickly too, not too much handling, just shaping really. this will do it for you. Don’t forget to let the fairies out!
      You Mum would be proud of you,
      Gemma 🙂

  68. Mary Aris on March 16, 2017 at 6:24 am

    Gemma, I love All your tutorials! This is the BEST Irish Soda Bread I’ve ever found. Quick question: I have a fan assisted electric oven. What temperature should I bake this bread and for how long?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2017 at 12:55 pm

      Hi Mary,
      My Mum always bakes this at 200C fan. I tend to reduce it to 200C!
      A hot oven is usually the thing for bread, so, i suggest you try it, it will cook a little quicker, and should have a crisper crust!
      Then try it my way!
      Gemma 🙂

  69. Steve Sheppard on March 17, 2017 at 8:04 am

    Hey Gemma! For clarification I had a question… your recipe calls for 2 tablespoons of lemon juice or vinegar for a cup of milk but in the question and answers you commented to someone about adding one teaspoon to one pint of milk. It was 2% milk but it confused me. Which is the proper mixture for one cup of 2% milk?

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2017 at 10:38 am

      Hi Steve,
      2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white vinegar
      1 Cup (8oz / 224g) milk (full or low fat)
      The fat content is irrelevant.
      I will correct that comment if I can trace it, thank you,
      Gemma 🙂

  70. Profile photo of Susan Susan on March 19, 2017 at 8:16 am

    Hi Gemma,
    A GREAT soda bread recipe that be a little slice of heaven as airy as a fluffy cloud !!!!! Will surely replace any that I have made over the years with this one . The perfect slice to hold a nice slice of corned beef. I added 2 T of caraway seed as I like the flavor with the corned beef. I love ALL of you recipe’s and anxiously wait for every new one. Keep up the good work <3
    Susan

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 20, 2017 at 3:21 am

      Ah Great. I am so happy to hear that! Caraway seeds is where our ways will part lol! not my favorite flavor for some odd reason, but the corned beef!! heaven.
      Thank you for being with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  71. Kate on March 26, 2017 at 7:50 am

    After trying so many recipes for soda bread and ending up with brick-bread, I found yours and IT’S AMAZING. My husband and I threw a belated St. Patricks day party and I made 4 loafs and while much of was devoured, I still have a bunch of sliced bread that I don’t wasn’t to go bad. Any ideas on using it for something other than toast? Thanks so much for all your recipes and tutorials!

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 27, 2017 at 12:34 pm

      Hi Kate,
      The problem with soda bread is that it is best served fresh, or frozen when it is fresh.
      There are recipes for stuffings using this bread, and this salad would be good too (http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/panzanella_bread_salad/).
      My Mum used to caramelize the crumbs and add them to an ice cream! I will ask her if she has this recipe, but it will not be quick enough for your need!
      Gemma 🙂

  72. Shreyas on March 29, 2017 at 6:50 am

    Hi Gemma,
    I always have been a fan of your recipes and am so happy on seeing this whole wheat bread so as we dont really use much AP flour here..☺
    I wanted to know how long this bread can be stored?How long will it last at around 30°C(room temperature here) without keeping it in a refrigerator?
    Thanks in advanced,
    Shreyas

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on March 29, 2017 at 8:10 am

      Hi there,
      This bread, or any soda bread/scones etc are best eaten on the day they are made. Traditionally this bread would have been made every day, with the remainder used up at breakfast. at warm room temperature it will do well for about 12 hours, It will not spoil, but it will not be at it’s best after this,
      Gemma 🙂

  73. Dan on April 18, 2017 at 12:38 pm

    If I’m just making this for myself, are there different measurements you would suggest?
    I don’t think I could eat all that bread in one day!! … Or could I …..

    Thanks

    • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 19, 2017 at 2:20 am

      Hi Dan,
      Good question! You can make this as a scone, that is divide this into sections, bake it off, divide and freeze what you do not want.
      you are right though, you may be tempted to eat it all! Brown bread is lovely toasted too, but is best eaten on the day it is made.
      Gemma 🙂

      • Dan on April 21, 2017 at 11:20 am

        I made this bread a couple of nights ago and it was honestly so lovely. First thing I’ve baked ever!
        If I half the ingredients will everything go okay?

        The bread was still okay for a couple of days after, but you’re right, it’s so much better on the day it’s made.

        • Profile photo of Gemma Stafford Gemma Stafford on April 22, 2017 at 1:00 am

          Hi Dan,
          Good job! delighted that the first thing you baked was a traditional Irish recipe.
          Yes, you can bake 1/2 of this. Traditionally this 1/2 cake would have been baked in a triangular shape, easy to cut!
          Good to have you with us, keep baking,
          Gemma 🙂

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