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Rustic Scottish Bannock Recipe

4.88 from 8 votes
If you want to make an easy, hearty, rustic bread in a skillet, look no further than my delicious Scottish Bannock recipe!
Scottish Bannock cut into four in the cast iron pan.

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Hi Bold Bakers!

Scottish bannocks are a simple, rustic, and hearty skillet bread popular in Ireland, England, North America, and of course, Scotland. Since this bread has been around so long (since the 8th century!!), every family has its own take on the recipe, and I’m glad to share mine with you!

Bannocks are made with just a few common ingredients that are probably already in your home. In my instructions, I’ll show you how to turn old-fashioned rolled oats into oat flour, and if you don’t have any buttermilk on hand, you can always make your own.

These bannocks are perfect served alongside some soup on a cold day or with eggs for breakfast. They’re quick to bake as well—there’s no yeast, so there’s no need to let the dough rest, and you only have to bake it for around 25 minutes on a skillet! 

A slice of Scottish Bannock resting on another one.

What Is Scottish Bannock?

If you’re a fan of the show or book series Outlander, then you may be familiar with bannock! Bannocks are flat, round oat-based bread that has a texture that is somewhat like a scone. It’s believed they were first made in Scotland, where they were traditionally cooked on a stone. If you don’t feel like roughing it, I recommend using a cast-iron skillet or frying pan instead! 

What You Need To Make Scottish Bannock

How To Make Scottish Bannock

I find it amazing that this bread has been around for so long and is still enjoyed today! Here is how you make Scottish bannock (get the full recipe with measurements below):

  1. To make oat flour, finely grind your oatmeal in a food processor or blender. Transfer the ground oatmeal to a medium-sized bowl.
  2. Whisk in the flour, baking soda, and salt. Then, mix in the buttermilk until a dough is formed.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead it once or twice to bring it all together. Form the dough into an 8-inch (20cm) disc.
  4. Heat your skillet over low heat. Add just a touch of oil, and then place the dough on the skillet.
  5. Cook the bannock until it is nicely browned; this usually takes around 10-15 minutes. Then, flip the bannock and cook on the other side for another 10 minutes or so. 
  6. Divide the bread into wedges and serve warm with butter and jam.

Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips For Making Scottish Bannock

  • When you are cooking the bannock, make sure you are using low heat and patience. Otherwise, the outside may brown before the center is fully cooked.
  • If you don’t have buttermilk, then you can easily make my Buttermilk Substitute.
  • Level off your teaspoon of baking soda; more baking soda won’t help the bread rise more; it will just give your bread an acidic aftertaste.
  • If you prefer, divide the dough into 8 equal portions, shape it into discs, and cook individual bannocks.
  • Make a savory bannock by adding 2 teaspoons of fresh thyme or 1 cup (3 oz/85g) of grated cheddar cheese to the dough.
  • You can mix in 2/3 cup (3 1/3 oz/94g) dried fruit (chopped if large) to the dough before baking as well! 

A close up of three Scottish Bannock stacked on each other.

How Do I Store Scottish Bannock?

You can store any leftover Scottish bannock in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Make More Bread!

And don’t forget to buy my Bigger Bolder Baking Cookbook!

Full (and printable) recipe below!

Rustic Scottish Bannock Recipe

4.88 from 8 votes
If you want to make an easy, hearty, rustic bread in a skillet, look no further than my delicious Scottish Bannock recipe!
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 8 servings
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
If you want to make an easy, hearty, rustic bread in a skillet, look no further than my delicious Scottish Bannock recipe!
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (6oz/170g) old fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup (5oz/142g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (6floz/180ml) buttermilk
  • Oil (for cooking)

Instructions

  • Finely grind the oatmeal in a food processor or blender, and then transfer to a medium-sized mixing bowl.
  • To the oats, whisk in the flour, baking soda, and salt, and then mix in the buttermilk until a dough is formed.
  • Turn the dough out onto a floured surface, knead once or twice to bring it together, and then form the dough into an 8-inch (20 cm) disc.
  • Heat a skillet over low heat. Add a touch of oil and then place the dough disc in the skillet.
  • Cook the bannock until nicely browned (about 10-15 minutes) and then flip and cook the other side and cook for another 10 minutes or so.
  • Divide into wedges and serve while still warm with butter and jam. Store leftovers in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.
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Hazel
Hazel
1 year ago

I just made this and am absolutely in love! I added a little cinnamon. so warm and comforting <3 thank you!

Teresa Green
Teresa Green
1 year ago

Hi Gemma , I’m from Naas, Co. Kildare. I hate to sound ignorant but WHAT is a skillet. Can I use a Le Creuset cast iron round casserole on my Induction Hob – on low heat ! !. Thank you so much, LOVE YOUR RECIPES – one of my FAVOURITES – CREAMED RICE, could never get that result before now. Teresa.

Celia
Celia
10 months ago

I have loved all the recipes I have tried from you Gemma a question about this one, can I use all oat flour instead of the all purpose flour?

Sara
Sara
1 month ago

This looks like an excellent recipe! I wanted to make some bannock for my very first Michaelmas, but I couldn’t find any other recipes that are measured out in grams. Happily I found yours, it is just what I am looking for!

Mikayla
Mikayla
1 year ago

Could I add some sugar and cinnamon?

Barbra Nehls
Barbra Nehls
1 year ago

When baking on the stove top, do you leave the pan open or do you cover it? Thank you.

sahla
sahla
1 year ago

Hello Gemma!. I love your recipes and I’ve been a fan for a long time!. i wanted to know if you were familiar with Belvita biscuits (two large sized biscuits , cardamom spiced, looks like waffles and absolutely gorgeous!), I love these biscuits, but they are not available in my country. Could you, if possible whip up a recipe for this.
thank you for your time!, and keep up the amazing work!
With love,
Sahla

Fiona
Fiona
1 year ago

They look so nice, I don’t have a cast iron skillet, just a stainless steel one, is there any other way of cooking them other than the cast iron skillet, thank you

Debbie
Debbie
1 year ago

Hi Gemma! Can this recipe be baked rather than cooked stove top?

Romy
Romy
1 year ago

The bannocks look delicious! Can you add raisins? Also, do they need to be cooked in a cast iron skillet or can it be any skillet?

About Us

Meet Gemma

About Us

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, a cookbook author, and the creator of Bigger Bolder Baking. I want to help you bake with confidence anytime, anywhere with my trusted and tested recipes and baking tips. You may have seen one of my 500+ videos on YouTube & TikTok or as a guest judge on Nailed It! on Netflix or the Best Baker in America on Food Network. No matter your skills, my Bold Baking Team & I want to be your #1 go-to baking authority.

 

Weeknight Family Favorites Chapter from the Bigger Bolder Baking Every Day Cookbook