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1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns Recipe

1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns

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Perfect your burger with my 1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns recipe, and skip the store-bought options for something way better.


Hi Bold Bakers!

Since no BBQ, picnic, beach day, or camping trip is complete without an incredible burger I decided this summer was the time to show you how to make my 1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns!

Since a burger is only really as good as its bun, you DO NOT want to go for those flavorless, store-bought buns! My Homemade Hamburger Buns are made with real yeast, milk, flour, a bit of butter, some sugar — and that’s it! Topped just like the real deal with sesame seeds, these look like the quintessential Hamburger Buns, but the flavor is tenfold! This bun recipe is right on time for 4th of July and you’re going to LOVE them!

How Do You Shape Hamburger Buns?

One of my talents is working with dough. There is a little bit of a trick to shaping the dough into a nice clean bun.

The trick is not to use both hands, rolling the dough around between your palms, but rather to use one hand to push the dough against the palm of your other hand, smoothing it out and tucking in the seams. Once you have one side nice and smooth place it seam-side down on your tray, revealing a smooth rounded bun! If it’s not perfect or you don’t get it nice and smooth on the first try, no worries, this takes practice!

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How Do These Hamburger Buns Only Take an Hour?

The dough will rise 1 time for 20 minutes, then after being shaped, they rise for another 20 minutes. Lastly, they are baked for 18-20 minutes. You don’t have to be an expert bread baker to make the most incredible bakery style Hamburger Buns at home.

How Long Do Hamburger Buns Last?

These buns can be made 2-3 days in advance depending on if you’re going to toast your buns or not. If you’re going to serve them un-toasted they are nice and fluffy for up to 2 days. If you still have them after 2 days, I suggest toasting them.

How to Store Hamburger Buns

To store your Hamburger Buns, cover them in an airtight container at room temperature. Also, they can be frozen for up to 4 weeks.

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Tips and tricks to making Burger Buns

  • Use instant OR active yeast in this recipe
  • Careful not to overheat the milk, it only needs to be lukewarm
  • Don’t add all the milk in at once in case you don’t need it all
  • Freeze the baked rolls in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 4 weeks
  • You can replace the sugar with runny honey in the same quantity
  • Top the buns with un-toasted sesame seeds 

Try These Other Recipes!

  • 1- Hour Dinner Rolls
  • Traditional Irish Soda Bread
  • Crazy Dough: One Base Dough, Endless Flavors!

I wrote a cookbook! The Bigger Bolder Baking Cookbook is available for pre-order!

And don’t forget to follow Bigger Bolder Baking on Pinterest!

5 from 5 votes
1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns Recipe
1-Hour Homemade Hamburger Buns Recipe
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Proofing time
40 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 
Course: Dinner
Cuisine: American
Servings: 9 Buns
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
  • 4 cups (20oz/566g) all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast* (if using active yeast see notes)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons (1oz/28g) butter, softened
  • 1 1/2 cups (12floz/340ml) milk, warmed
Egg wash:
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons milk
Topping:
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, add in the flour and sugar. To one side of the bowl, mix in the dry yeast. On the other side, mix in the salt, being sure they do not make direct contact as this can deactivate the yeast.

  2. In a separate jug, combine the butter and milk then gently heat in the microwave just until the butter is melted and the milk is lukewarm. 

  3. Turn the mixer on low-speed and stream in the wet ingredients, holding some back to ensure the dough does not get overly wet. Once the dough forms a ball and cleans the bottom of the bowl, knead for about 6-8 minutes. The dough should be smooth and elastic.

  4. Transfer the dough into a lightly greased large bowl and cover tightly with cling wrap and a tea towel. Let the dough rise in a warm place to proof, about 20 minutes.

  5. After 20 minutes, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Using a dough cutter or knife, cut the dough into 9 (3 1/2oz/99g) balls.

  6. Roll each ball against your work surface with your hand to shape into a smooth bun. The pressure against the table will help you get a round, smooth roll. This takes some practice. 

  7. Line a baking tray with parchment paper then place each bun (seam side down) about 2 inches apart on the baking tray.

  8. Using a pastry brush, apply a thin even layer of egg wash to the buns, ensuring there is no excess dripping down the side of the bun (this can keep them from rising up evenly when baking).

  9. Sprinkle each bun with sesame seeds then cover the tray with cling wrap, making sure the buns are sealed nice and tight. Place in a warm spot to proof for a second time for 20 minutes.

  10. While the buns are proofing for a second time preheat your oven to 400°F (200°C).
  11. After 20 minutes, GENTLY peel back the cling wrap.

  12. Bake the buns for 18-20 minutes, until golden brown and risen.

  13. Transfer the buns to a rack to cool, before slicing in half and serving.
  14. Cover and store the buns in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. Freeze the buns for up to 4 weeks.  

  15. * This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form/sponge on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.

Recipe Notes

*If using Active Dried Yeast you need to sponge the yeast to use:  This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form/sponge on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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18 Comments

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  1. Robin Denicola on July 8, 2019 at 11:26 am

    Hi Gemma,
    My daughter and I enjoy baking with you:)
    I’m to bring whole wheat burger buns to a gathering tomorrow, as they know I mill my grains, they are asking me to bring the buns. HELP! I do NOT have a mixer . My flour is 6 parts bronze wheat, 3parts spelt berry and 3 parts kamut grain. I have instant yeast on hand. Thanks a million!
    Robin and Ashley

    • Gemma Stafford on July 8, 2019 at 1:16 pm

      Hi Robin, To be honest, I have not had as much experience with freshly milled, ancient grains! You might need to help me there. But keep in mind that these 3 different kinds of wheat will behave differently. They will have different moisture absorption rates and will be denser if you use them whole grain. They will not be as fluffy as when you use all purpose flour. You’d have to experiment a little on the combinations and ratios. If you’d like you can try for half APF and half bronze wheat / spelt / kamut. Let me know how you go along. Gemma 😊

  2. Elaine on July 4, 2019 at 5:20 pm

    Gemma, you have great recipes. Crazy dough is great fun! It’s a good way to get kids cooking. Thanks.

    You might want to proofread recipes a little better. Seam came out seem in one instance. And, I don’t think you meant to say “blood temperature” as it came out on one recipe. It might be because spellcheck thinks it can read minds.

    Keep up the great work.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 5, 2019 at 4:08 am

      Hi Elaine,
      haha! I have always said ‘I am a cook, not a scholar’ and sometimes you are right, in the heat of the moment spellings can go awry. Thank you, we revisit them from time to time when we find errors. I will check back on this one.
      ‘Blood temperature’ is a baking term, believe it or not. It traditionally meant that if you put your finger into this liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold, but the temperature of your blood. A bit zany I know, but a good test just the same.
      Thank you for pointing this out to me, I rely on your eagle eyes to keep me right.
      Gemma 🙂

      • Elaine on July 5, 2019 at 5:35 am

        Hi Gemma,

        Thanks for explaining “blood temperature”—totally new to me and it gave me a chuckle for today. I’ve never thought to take the temperature of my blood. I would prefer another way to describe the ideal temperature of food though. 🙂

        • Gemma Stafford on July 6, 2019 at 2:39 am

          Haha! Elaine, there you go!
          Blood temperature is the ideal temperature you get with a thermometer under your tongue when you are fit and well.
          In this case, about 98F/36,5C. on a baking thermometer.
          Hope this is of help,
          Gemma 🙂

  3. Sue on July 4, 2019 at 5:07 am

    Hi Gemma, had a disaster with this recipie.
    When I checked the recipie I had put 240 mls of milk as stated but that is not 12 fluid oz as also stated!
    I’m having another try but you may want to amend your recipie (or is it different in USA) I’m in the UK.
    Kind regards, sue

    • Gemma Stafford on July 6, 2019 at 2:09 am

      Hi Sue,
      my deepest apologies, you are right, the measurement was incorrect in the recipe, I have no excuse for this. I have now corrected this.
      The other thing to consider when yeast baking is the flour. Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when, and even the type of wheat being milled. It absorbs liquids differently too, depending on humidity, temperature, etc. It is much easier to add more than to take some out! So, next time stop when the dough comes together into a clean ball. This is what you want. Add 3/4 of the liquids in one go, then the remainder more slowly, until the dough comes together. My mum uses Tesco strong flour for her yeast baking, it is a little under 12% protein, which is the gluten, and works really nicely.
      Thank you for pointing this error out to me, I depend on your eagle eyes to keep me right!
      Gemma 🙂

  4. Sarah Rhodes on June 29, 2019 at 6:18 am

    Disappointed with fairly firm buns (not fluffy burger buns) not cooked through after 24 min at 200°. All ingredients are new & accurately measured. I was expecting those light, fluffy baps. What makes a lighter bake please?

    • Gemma Stafford on June 30, 2019 at 4:26 am

      Hi Sarah,
      it sounds to me that they were under proofed. The time it takes to proof yeast bread is dependent on two things, the temperature of the kitchen and the type of yeast used. I think this sounds like a yeast issue.
      Dry Yeast: It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator. This one needs sponging in most cases.
      Instant Dry Yeast: This is the one which can be added directly to flour, and does not need sponging.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form/sponge on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      A poorly proofed dough will not bake properly, in texture or in time – this recipe will work for you all things being equal.
      I am sorry you were disappointed in this, but do try again,
      Gemma 🙂

  5. Angela on June 27, 2019 at 2:54 am

    Hi Gemma

    Could this recipe be made gluten free and, if so, do you have any idea if it would turn out as a dough or batter after the initial mix?

    Many thanks😃

  6. Daniela on June 26, 2019 at 10:39 am

    Gemma love you recipes !! They always works perfectly. Do you have the recipe for potato hamburger buns ??? I really near a good recipe for it. Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on June 26, 2019 at 2:57 pm

      Hi Daniela! I do not have a potato hamburger bun recipe yet. I will add this to my list. Thanks for the suggestion! Gemma 😊

  7. Monika Felicella on June 26, 2019 at 8:12 am

    Do you have a recipe for salted caramel ice cream, seems to be my family’s fav. Thanks

  8. Debbie Young on June 25, 2019 at 3:51 pm

    Please make a video to demonstrate how to make these buns!

    • Gemma Stafford on June 26, 2019 at 2:56 am

      Hi Debbie,
      We may get around to that, but I wanted to get this recipe up for the picnic/BBQ time of year in many places. I will add it to the list, see what we can do,
      Gemma 🙂

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