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Crazy dough Bread - 1 dough that can make a variety of breads from Pizza to Cinnamon Rolls.

Crazy Dough: One Easy Bread Recipe with Endless Variations

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Hi Bold Bakers!
First things first, what is Crazy Dough? Well what if I told you that from one simple yeast dough you can get endless variations of completely different breads, from pizza dough, naan, focaccia, cinnamon rolls and even loafs of cheesy bread. All you need is this one easy master recipe.

This unique dough starts with the basics: flour, water, yeast and sugar. But it gets a texture and flavor boost from a few eggs and rich creamy yogurt. And like many of my doughs you do not need to mix this dough on a machine, you simply mix it by hand and let it ferment.

With this seriously crazy dough base you can add sweet or savory toppings and stuffings. You can roll, twist and bake this into a variety of shapes, allowing you to successfully experiment with all kinds of different bread based baked goods. I’ve created an amazing series of 8 different recipes around this one dough that I will release over the next 8 weeks. You will be blown away by how easy this is to make and how versatile it really is. My favorite thing to do is whip up this master recipe and keep it in the fridge all week long to be turned into whatever my friends and family are craving that day. No special machine needed, and messy kneading. Give this a try and you will see why this is called Crazy Dough.

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Crazy Cookie Dough: You won't believe all of the cookie flavors you can get from one plain cookie dough like Chocolate Chip, Salted Caramel or even Peanut butter!! Click and find out how

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Crazy Dough
 
Prep time
Total time
 
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Ingredients
  • ½ cup ( 4floz/120ml) milk
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons dry yeast
  • 3⅓ cup (16½ oz/500g) all-purpose flour
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (6oz/180g) plain yogurt
  • 1 whole egg*
Instructions
  1. In a small jug stir together the lukewarm milk, sugar and yeast. Let stand for 15 minutes until yeast activates. It will become foamy and start expanding.
  2. In a large bowl combine the flour, baking powder and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl combine the yogurt and the egg
  4. Once the yeast has activated add the yeast mixture and yogurt egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Using a fork stir everything together until it forms a loose, sticky dough.
  5. If the dough is too dry, add a little bit of milk or water. If it is too soft, add just a little bit of flour.
  6. Once all the ingredients are combined gently knead/ fold the dough together until it forms a rough ball.
  7. Cover the dough tightly with cling wrap and a tea towel and place in a warm spot to proof for 2 hours.
  8. Once the dough has risen it should be about double in size. From here you can take this crazy all purpose dough and make it into any of the following things!
  9. Cheesy loaf, pizza, naan bread, savory stuffed roll, classic cinnamon rolls, pretzels, jalapeno and cheese stuffed dinner rolls, and braided Nutella loaf.
  10. Keep it in your fridge for up to 4 days. You can freeze it, too.
Notes
*If you don't eat eggs leave it out and add a little more milk.

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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403 Comments

  1. Karen Kilpatrick on September 21, 2017 at 12:17 pm

    Gemma I make this bread on a daily basis as neighbors, friends and loved ones seem to know when I put it in the oven! Is there a way I could make enough dough to make 6 loaves at a time? I’ve also been known to add Jalapeno peppers to your cheesy bread and WOW. I form them into hamburger size rolls and when baked and cooled I split them horizontally, spread a little mayo and make a sandwich of roast beef, tomato and swiss cheese. Heaven has come down to earth.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 3:01 pm

      Hi Karen,
      Your idea for this bread sounds divine! I will have to try it.
      Yes, you really can make this as a large batch, as long as you can handle it. Perhaps two triple batches may be easier to manage, in terms of mixing it, and proofing it too, it will meed a large container, and a large working surface too. You will exactly triple it, all of the ingredients, including the yeast. Try one large batch, once the dough is mixed you can break it down into more manageable portions to work with. A plastic washing up bowl, saved for this purpose, is a great bowl for a large batch of dough. My Mum uses, and re-uses a large turkey cooking bag as a proofing bag!
      hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Anna on September 20, 2017 at 11:30 pm

    Gemma, such a great recipe! Will try it in the next days! Just one question -if I want to freeze the dough or keep it in the fridge a couple of days, should I proof it first? I’ve always frozen only already baked things 🤔 Thanks a lot! //Anna

    • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 12:47 am

      Hi Anna,
      Great question!
      1. If you want to freeze the dough it will be best to proof it first, just the first proofing. Then get it into the shape you wish to bake it in. If you want to make pizza for instance then portion the dough, wrap each piece well and bag the pieces for freezing. When you remove it from the freezer remove the wrap as soon as it is possible to do so, then cover the dough and proof the second time before baking. flat breads do not need so much proofing, so as soon as you can stretch them out, they are really ready to go.
      2. You can keep this dough in the fridge, in fact you can proof it in the fridge for quite a ling time. Here you will get it moving at room temperature, and then cover down the bowl, and refrigerate for a few days. If this is your intention then the no knead dough will be a great alternative for you. You can check them out here. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/best-ever-pizza-dough/) if you pop the term ‘no knead’ into the search bar you will be offered a great selection.
      Long cold proofing will change the flavor and texture of a dough, it is fermented over the time, and develops a sour doughg type flavor. Do try this too, you will not believe how easy it is!
      Thank you for being here with us, submit a photo of your bread when you are done!
      Gemma 🙂

  3. chitvillegas on September 19, 2017 at 10:50 pm

    Hi Gemma…am proofing this recipe right now. My question is can yogurt be substituted in the future? What does it do in bread recipe? Thanks…ever grateful to you”

    • Gemma Stafford on September 20, 2017 at 2:14 am

      Hi Chit,
      well done you!
      Yes you can use buttermilk in place of the yogurt. There is a science to baking, and in this case it is to do with an alkaline acid balance. This is known as a ‘quick dough’ and it all helps to improve the raising of the dough. It is about time really.
      I wish you much success, and thank you for being here with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  4. Kristi on September 19, 2017 at 5:38 pm

    Hello Gemma!
    This might sound really dumb, but I just tried to make the dough and it came out super sticky. It was really difficult to even get it off my hands. Is is supposed to be like that or does it need to be fixed? Also, how do I fix it if necessary? Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 20, 2017 at 2:47 am

      Hi Kristi,
      No, it is not supposed to be that sticky! I think something wrong with your measurements. When you are adding the liquids to any dough, you really need to add it carefully. Flour in different places absorbs liquid in different ways, depending on how, where ,when and the type of wheat being milled. It takes very little extra to go from too little to too much. So, next time add 3/4 in one go, then the remainder slowly, until the dough comes together in a clean ball, then stop!
      You can fix this one, pour a good amount of flour onto the table, a couple of ounces, and dump the dough on to this. Then you fold it through, it will happen really quickly, then proceed as per the recipe.
      Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Kristi on September 21, 2017 at 1:34 am

        Thank you for the response Gemma! I ended up with a really great cheesy garlic bread AND a delicious cinnamon and raisin bread! I also wanted to say thank you for your wonderful videos and posts. I’ve always had a love of cooking and baking but lately my depression has been making it difficult to even make a microwavable frozen meal. After watching a bunch of your videos, I’ve found myself back in the kitchen and totally loving it!! I know I’m probably way over sharing here, but I just wanted to say thank you for the inspiration to get out of bed and get back to doing something I love!

        • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 2:30 am

          Hi Kristi,
          No, not over sharing, we do not do enough of this!
          Baking is a great mindful activity, and at the end of it you have something good to eat, so win win.
          When you are baking you do not have time to ruminate, you become absorbed in your task, and get away from the stresses of life. You are also learning something by doing, and this is very good for our hearts and heads!
          Thank you for your lovely comments here, they will be of help to others,
          Gemma 🙂

  5. Manu on September 18, 2017 at 7:41 pm

    Can you please tell some tips on how to always work perfectly with yeast
    Please🙏🙏

    • Gemma Stafford on September 19, 2017 at 1:24 am

      Hi Manu,
      The substitute you use for eggs in a recipe will depend on the recipe! Check out the chart here on the website. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/egg-substitutes-for-baking/).
      The type of yeast you use will dictate how you use it. If you use a dried yeast, and this is the most readily available, it is important to read the pack. Some are designed to go straight into the flour, and are mixed with the liquids for proving. Others are sponged, that is they are mixed with the warm/blood temperature (that means you should barely feel the mixture, neither hot or cold, with your finger). You always add the yeast to the liquids, not the other way around. Stir it through, and allow it to stand. A foam/sponge will form on top of the liquid, this is proof that the yeast is good, alive, and that it will work in your bake.
      Here is a reply I formulate for this frequently asked question:
      What type of yeast should I use, why does my dough not rise?
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      I do hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Manu on September 19, 2017 at 6:29 pm

        Thanks for you kind reply😃
        Will surely gonna give it 2nd try with your tips!!

  6. Klara on September 18, 2017 at 5:53 am

    Can I use fresh yeast instead of dried yeast? How much then?
    🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on September 19, 2017 at 2:41 am

      Hi Klara,
      Here is an explanation of yeast, it is worth learning about this.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast, which is about 2 teaspoons).
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      I hope this is of use to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  7. SANTA V DEL ANGEL on September 16, 2017 at 9:27 pm

    What if the dough doesn’t want to rise after 2 hours? What did I do wrong? =(

    • Gemma Stafford on September 17, 2017 at 3:34 am

      Hi there,
      Really? This may have something to do with the type of yeast you used.
      I need a little more information to help. did you sponge the yeast in the liquids before adding to the flour?
      Did it form a foam/sponge? What did you do with the salt? does the dough look too dry?
      What is the temperature in your room?
      all of these things matter!
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Mariely on September 15, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    Hi! Gemma

    Can I used white whole wheat instead of white plain flour?
    Can I make bagels with this recipe?

    Thanks,
    Mariely Q

    • Gemma Stafford on September 16, 2017 at 8:53 am

      Hi there,
      I do not know what white whole wheat is! I use wheat flour usually. Plain/all purpose flour is wheat flour.
      Whole wheat has the bran, and the wheat germ intact in the flour, and looks brown.
      You can use a mix of whole wheat, and all purpose flour in this recipe. the gluten is less available in wholewheat flour, though some have added vital wheat to boost the gluten.
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

  9. Luna on September 13, 2017 at 4:02 pm

    Hi Gemma, What would happen if I added butter to the dough, or is that not recommended? Thank you!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:02 pm

      So Luna, you can add i butter if you like. I don’t recommend adding in an ingredients like that because it could change the final product.

      What my mum does is grate frozen butter and cheese and folds it into a bread dough. It’s awesome and buttery.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  10. Bharti on September 13, 2017 at 11:00 am

    Hi Gemma
    I wanna try it for buns..
    Before starting off, I wanted to ask you, if I can use this dough (without egg ) with 24 hour proof method! I mean no kneading at all, just like your No Knead Doughnuts!
    And if yes, can u plz tell me how many proofings more are required after these 24 hours!
    Thanks in advance

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:53 pm

      Hi Bharti,

      so yes you can do this no knead just like the doughnuts. Only one more proofing is needed and that is after you make your rolls. You will want to proof them for at least 45 minutes to 1 hour before baking them.

      Best,
      Gemma.

      • Bharti on September 15, 2017 at 12:27 am

        Hey thanks dear
        I thought, u missed reading my query, so have put the same query on YouTube too! Please ignore it!
        And thanks a bunch for answering my queries so patiently.
        Love

        • Gemma Stafford on September 15, 2017 at 2:57 am

          You are welcome Bharti, I get to all of the comments here, eventually! Some days I have more pressure on my time than others. It is great to have you baking with us,
          Gemma 🙂

  11. Ruqaiyah on September 13, 2017 at 5:21 am

    Hi there gemma
    I would like to make just a plain loaf using this recipe so after proofing i dont have a loaf tin to bake it in but i have a silicon loaf mould so will it work just the same or do i have to adjust the temperature of the oven as is it silicone instead of a tin Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:12 pm

      Hi,

      so you don’t have to adjust the temp, do the same. Just loaf a loaf free form and bake. Everything will be the same. 🙂

  12. Patty on September 13, 2017 at 3:06 am

    Hi Gemma,

    How do you device which temperature and heat to use when you want to make your own variation? I can see that all your different breads have different ones and if I want to play with this I’m not sure what to use?

    Love,
    Patty

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 4:59 pm

      Hi Patty!

      do you mean temperature of baking? like 400oF?

      If so it is a sliding range for bread. if it’s a crusty bug loaf you want to be 400plus.

      Smalled things like dinner rolls, pretzels, anything that baking quite quickly you are roughly around 375F. I hope this helps. Regardless stay in and around this range.

      Gemma.

  13. Sophie on September 11, 2017 at 2:57 am

    Hi Gemma! can I use easy bake yeast?
    Thank you! Xx

    • Gemma Stafford on September 11, 2017 at 9:41 pm

      yes you can use that yeast, no problem 🙂

  14. Vicki A Hernandez on September 10, 2017 at 3:42 pm

    Hi Gemma I’m getting ready to make the crazy dough recipe but I have a question… Can it be 2% or 1% milk or does it have to be whole milk? Thanks so much can’t wait to try it and I already have stuff together to make all fruit Popsicles also

    • Gemma Stafford on September 11, 2017 at 2:04 am

      Hi Vicki,
      The milk is not so important, the difference between full fat milk (3.5%) and 1% is little enough. it is there to soften and slightly enrich the dough.
      Gemma 🙂

  15. Diane on September 9, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    Can I add extra sugar to dough if I want to make cinnamon rolls?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 10, 2017 at 3:24 am

      Hi Diane,
      yes, you certainly may, but it will not really be necessary if it is on the filling. If you mean that you are adding the cinnamon to the dough, then the extra sugar will be great, a handful of raisins, or dried cranberries would be good in this too.
      Gemma 🙂

  16. Luna on September 7, 2017 at 11:01 am

    Hi Gemma! Can I leave out the yogurt or would I have to substitute that with something like sour cream? Thanks!

  17. Nancy on September 3, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Hello Gemma

    Could I make just two plain loaves of bread with this dough…if so how would I go about it?

    With thanks – I love your videos – you make procedures so very clear and easy!!

    Nancy

    • Gemma Stafford on September 3, 2017 at 11:36 am

      Hi Nancy,
      You could make one good sized loaf per recipe.
      Proof the dough really well, that means leave it until it bubbles up, about triple in size. Do this in a warm place in a covered bowl. You can make a bigger batch by doubling up the recipe. When it is proofed turn it out onto a floured surface. Shape it, and if you are using a loaf tin place it in, cover the pan and proof it again. the dough should be about 3/4 of the way up the pan before you bake it. Then bake!
      This should work well for you. if it is your first time with yeast baking then take your time, you will soon be a pro!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Amanda on September 6, 2017 at 9:46 am

        Hi there,
        Can this dough be done or used in a bread making machine?
        Or do you have any recipes that can be used in a bread making machine from start to finish?

        • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2017 at 6:42 pm

          Hi Amanda,

          Yes it can. It will work well 🙂

  18. samiksha.anand on September 3, 2017 at 10:41 am

    HI GEMMA
    I WANT TO ASK YOU INSTEAD OF EGG WANT CAN WE ADD TO CRAZY DOUGH TO GIVE SAME SOFTNESS. WILL BE THANKFUL IF U REPLY

    THANKS
    SAMIKSHA

    • Gemma Stafford on September 3, 2017 at 10:50 am

      Hi there,
      you can use a flax egg if you wish, you will find the instructions for this on the egg substitution chart here (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/egg-substitutes-for-baking/). you can also leave it out! Add a touch more milk, or perhaps a little melted butter, and proof your dough until it is really spongy. this will do it for you. The egg is an enricher. milk, butter and extra sugar, if you like, will soften the dough for you, Gemma 🙂

      • samiksha.anand on September 17, 2017 at 9:22 am

        thanks gemma

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