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Crazy dough Bread - 1 dough that can make a variety of breads from Pizza to Cinnamon Rolls.

Crazy Dough: One Easy Bread Recipe with Endless Variations

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Hi Bold Bakers!
First things first, what is Crazy Dough? Well what if I told you that from one simple yeast dough you can get endless variations of completely different breads, from pizza dough, naan, focaccia, cinnamon rolls and even loafs of cheesy bread. All you need is this one easy master recipe.

This unique dough starts with the basics: flour, water, yeast and sugar. But it gets a texture and flavor boost from a few eggs and rich creamy yogurt. And like many of my doughs you do not need to mix this dough on a machine, you simply mix it by hand and let it ferment.

With this seriously crazy dough base you can add sweet or savory toppings and stuffings. You can roll, twist and bake this into a variety of shapes, allowing you to successfully experiment with all kinds of different bread based baked goods. I’ve created an amazing series of 8 different recipes around this one dough that I will release over the next 8 weeks. You will be blown away by how easy this is to make and how versatile it really is. My favorite thing to do is whip up this master recipe and keep it in the fridge all week long to be turned into whatever my friends and family are craving that day. No special machine needed, and messy kneading. Give this a try and you will see why this is called Crazy Dough.

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Get all of my Crazy Dough Bread Recipes:

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Crazy Dough
 
Prep time
Total time
 
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Ingredients
  • ½ cup ( 4floz/120ml) milk
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons dry yeast
  • 3⅓ cup (16½ oz/500g) all-purpose flour
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (6oz/180g) plain yogurt
  • 1 whole egg*
Instructions
  1. In a small jug stir together the lukewarm milk, sugar and yeast. Let stand for 15 minutes until yeast activates. It will become foamy and start expanding.
  2. In a large bowl combine the flour, baking powder and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl combine the yogurt and the egg
  4. Once the yeast has activated add the yeast mixture and yogurt egg mixture to the dry ingredients. Using a fork stir everything together until it forms a loose, sticky dough.
  5. If the dough is too dry, add a little bit of milk or water. If it is too soft, add just a little bit of flour.
  6. Once all the ingredients are combined gently knead/ fold the dough together until it forms a rough ball.
  7. Cover the dough tightly with cling wrap and a tea towel and place in a warm spot to proof for 2 hours.
  8. Once the dough has risen it should be about double in size. From here you can take this crazy all purpose dough and make it into any of the following things!
  9. Cheesy loaf, pizza, naan bread, savory stuffed roll, classic cinnamon rolls, pretzels, jalapeno and cheese stuffed dinner rolls, and braided Nutella loaf.
  10. Keep it in your fridge for up to 4 days. You can freeze it, too.
Notes
*If you don't eat eggs leave it out and add a little more milk.

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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488 Comments

  1. Sandhya Rajan on November 20, 2017 at 7:08 pm

    Hi Gemma.
    You have not mentioned for how long and at what temp the dough has to be baked at.
    Would like reply at the earliest
    Sandhya

    • Gemma Stafford on November 21, 2017 at 7:27 am

      Hi there,
      The oven temperature will vary recipe by recipe. The temperatures are indicated in the individual recipes as here (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/crazy-dough-stuffed-bread/). This one for instance is 190C/375F.
      if you write ‘crazy dough’ in the search box you will get the list of the recipes presented.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Phoebe Cuddihy on November 20, 2017 at 1:50 am

    hello Gemma!!!!!
    I was wondering if i used a gluten free plain flour will it change the taste, texture ???????????
    Thanks a billion your amazing 🙂
    God bless you
    Phoebe

    • Gemma Stafford on November 20, 2017 at 9:29 am

      Yes you can, but just note that you might need more or less liquid because of the different flour. I don’t see why it wouldn’t work though 🙂

      Good Luck 🙂

      • Fatima on November 20, 2017 at 3:04 pm

        Can i make baked donuts with this dough

  3. erica on November 18, 2017 at 11:26 pm

    If you want to store the dough in the fridge … do you store it after the first proofing or after the sewond proofing ? Bit confusing …

    • Gemma Stafford on November 19, 2017 at 2:26 am

      Hi Erica,
      When you wish to slow down the development of a dough you cool it. This will not stop the fermentation, but it will slow it and develop the flavor.
      So, you can allow it to start rising, then refrigerate it. When you are ready to use it, form it into the bread you wish to make, proof, bake!
      Flat breads do not really need a second proofing.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  4. Meredith on November 18, 2017 at 11:01 am

    I was just wondering if it matter if I used 1% or whole milk for the recipe. I am looking forward to making this dough!

    Meredith

    • Gemma Stafford on November 19, 2017 at 8:50 am

      Hi Meredith,
      I like whole milk, but I use what I have to hand, it will make little difference.
      Happy that you are going to bake this bread,
      Gemma 🙂

  5. Kitty on November 14, 2017 at 10:35 pm

    Hi Gemma! Is it possible if we substitute yogurt with flavored Greek yogurt? Like vanilla? They ran out of plain yogurt at my grocery store 🙁

    • Gemma Stafford on November 15, 2017 at 2:40 am

      Hi Kitty,
      There are a couple of things you can do. flavored yogurts often have setting agents, and added sugars. You would be better to use buttermilk as a sub. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/homemade-buttermilk/). This will be good in this recipe.
      Yogurt also adds to the leavening of the bread, but the acid in the buttermilk will also help with this.
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Kitty on November 15, 2017 at 4:03 am

        Got it. Thank you for the quick response! Is it possible just to omit the yogurt from the recipe?

        • Gemma Stafford on November 17, 2017 at 2:57 am

          Hi Kitty,
          You neeed the acid ingredient, you can add a little lemon juice, or vinegar to the mix if you wish.
          Gemma 🙂

  6. melray on November 14, 2017 at 7:17 am

    is there any replacement for yogurt?

  7. Dana on November 8, 2017 at 2:19 pm

    Hi Gemma, is there a way I can substitute yogurt with Kefir in the recepe?

    Dana

    • Gemma Stafford on November 10, 2017 at 2:26 am

      Hi Dana,
      Yes, it will be good,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. HELENA DOYLE on November 5, 2017 at 9:57 am

    Gemma,
    You took all the scary out of making bread. I also rolled mine out and put apple pie filling, and then rolled it like a cinnamon roll. Delicious. Thank you

    • Gemma Stafford on November 5, 2017 at 2:53 pm

      Hi Helena,
      YES! Now this is what I love to hear. Yeast baking is actually fun, not scary, and you proved the point. well done to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  9. Karen Kilpatrick on October 30, 2017 at 11:01 pm

    Hi Gemma….I found yet ANOTHER way to bake crazy dough….As a stromboli! Italian sausage,mozzarella cheese, black olives,sliced mushrooms and your tomato sauce. Yum. Can’t thank you enough for these recipes. I have loads of quick, easy recipes I would love to share….is that possible?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 31, 2017 at 1:32 am

      Hi Karen,
      We are hoping to get our community involved in sharing recipes. Kevin is working on that. I will put this message where he can see it, it will motivate him. The Bold Baking Community is truly international now. Many of our Bold Bakers have recipes, specific to their regions, of which I have no knowledge or experience. It is a matter of setting this up in a coherent way, so that recipes can be shared in an orderly way. I love that idea.
      If you have ideas for me I will be delighted to get them too, you can do that here, or on email.
      Thank you for being with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. JENNIFER on October 30, 2017 at 12:45 pm

    CAN I USE GREEK YOGURT INSTEAD OF PLAIN YOGURT?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 30, 2017 at 6:55 pm

      yes you can, greek yogurt will work well.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  11. Shruthi Achut on October 28, 2017 at 10:16 am

    Hi Gemma, greetings !
    I have a question. Can I make tea cake out of this ? I am planning to roll out the dough, like naan bread, fill in mince meat and tie the ends to make it look like a sausage. Proof for an hour or two and bake them. And I’ll have a no meat dessert sausage.
    Or could i knead in mince meat into the crazy bread dough, like how you did to the cheezy bread ?
    Do let me know,
    Thanks and regards,
    Shruthi

    • Shruthi Achut on October 28, 2017 at 10:21 am

      I’ve never made bread even once in my life. I’ll try the crazy dough one tomorrow and let you know how it turns out.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 30, 2017 at 6:52 am

      Hi Shruthi,
      Yes! You can indeed make it like the cheesy bread. Pull out, roll out the dough, spread the mincemeat over this, and roll it up then slightly knead it to shape. Proof it and bake. It may need a touch longer for the second proofing.
      In the interest of clarity, for other Bold Bakers, you do mean sweet/mixed fruit mincemeat, right?
      Gemma 🙂

      • Shruthi Achut on October 30, 2017 at 7:24 am

        Yes Gemma, the very same 🙂
        And Gemma, I made Samosas out of the crazy bread dough. Turned out amazing ! Even better than the real thing. I baked them instead of frying. Who wants all that extra fat ! Lol 😀
        Any Indians here, you could try this too. You’ll be actually surprised at how good this comes out.

        • Gemma Stafford on October 30, 2017 at 6:50 pm

          Funny enough I have a huge and very loyal Indian following so I hope they read your comment.

          Really great idea. 🙂

      • Trisha Wiles on November 21, 2017 at 6:42 am

        I’m new to this area of baking. May I ask what proofing is ?

        • Gemma Stafford on November 21, 2017 at 8:24 am

          Hi Trisha,
          Actually the term describes to an older time when it was necessary to prove that the yeast was still alive. Nowadays there are yeasts which are designed to be added directly to the flour, these are called ‘instant dried yeast’ or ‘active dried yeast’. Then there is dried yeast and fresh yeast. Yeast is a living organism, it will not survive if it is too old/damp/stale.
          Today we tend to buy it in little foil packs. You can sponge these, any of them, in the liquids to be used for the bake, usually at blood temperature. You will see a foam/sponge forming on top of the liquids, you stir this through the liquids, then add to the flour. Add enough to bring the dough together in a clean ball, then stop.
          It is a learning curve, but you can do it! follow the steps carefully. Also try the no knead dough here (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/cinnamon-raisin-homemade-bread/), this can be baked as a plain bread too.
          I hope you get on well with this, do let me know,
          Gemma 🙂

  12. Rachel on October 26, 2017 at 3:28 pm

    can I make this dough in a bread maker

    • Gemma Stafford on October 27, 2017 at 2:35 am

      Hi Rachel.
      Sure, if you wish. I do not know what settings you have, but I think it best you follow your instruction book,
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Hareem on October 26, 2017 at 3:07 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    I just love your recipes and believe me you are my culinary heroine! 🙂 You make everything so easy for us.. I am a big fan of you crazy recipes..
    I’m going to try this dough recipe for cinnamon rolls in few days.. Yayyy.. 😀 I’ve never made cinnamon rolls in home before so I’m a little nervous 😀 but that doesn’t mean I don’t trust your recipe.. 🙂 I mean this is YOUR recipe.. how can it fail, right?? 😀
    Also, i have a question. I just want to know if I can use this recipe for plain or chicken and cheese stuffed dinner rolls too??

    Love,
    Hareem, xoxo!!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 27, 2017 at 2:39 am

      Hi there,
      Thank you so much for your kind words.
      You can stuff breads with almost anything, but when you add any meat it must be freshly cooked first.
      Cheese/sundried tomato/dried mushrooms will all work well for you, be careful abbout adding meats. Salami type meats work really well,
      Gemma 🙂

  14. Esse on October 24, 2017 at 11:30 am

    Hello Gemma. thanks for your recipe, your help and support. i am really interested in using this crazy dough for pretzels. please i have few questions.
    pretzels and baked doughnuts which is softer? because i love how pretzels are shiny compared to baked doughnuts.
    another question is please can i substitute the milk for melted butter? will it still come out nice and soft? i want the pretzel to be really soft so i wanted to know if i can use melted butter instead of the milk or divide the milk quantity in two and use some milk and some melted butter
    thanks for your response.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 25, 2017 at 1:55 am

      Hi Esse,
      The boiling in bicarbonate of soda is what gives pretzels, and Bagels their ‘skin’ or shiny finish. They are not the same finish as donuts, a different thing really.
      If you change the recipe, and you can do, it will change the result. I have not done this. You can do it, you can experiment with this. You do however need the milk, it is what will give you the soft finish,
      Gemma 🙂

  15. Alat on October 22, 2017 at 2:25 pm

    I will try your receipe soon Gemma. Thanks.

  16. ash on October 17, 2017 at 8:18 am

    Hello Gemma,
    Once the dough is frozen, may I please know 1) How long can it be frozen for? 2) When it’s out of the freezer, do you just allow it to come to room temperature on its own?
    Many thanks for the wonderful recipe.
    ash x

    • Gemma Stafford on October 18, 2017 at 3:17 am

      Hi Ash,
      good questions.
      The dough will be happy in the freezer for about 3 – 4 weeks, but I prefer to use it up reasonably quickly.
      When you remove it from the fridge it will come to temperature really quite quickly, when you can form it into the shape for baking then it is ready. It will need to be proofed again at that point, depending on what you are going to do with it. Flat breads really just need to be shaped and baked!
      Gemma 🙂

    • LadyIreland on October 18, 2017 at 10:57 am

      I have solved my multiple loaves dilemma! I set aside one day and make usually 12 dough recipes then after the first proofing I put them in my baking tin and freeze them. When the dough is solid I take it out of the tin and into a ziplock bag and back into the freezer. Now when I need dough I just go to the freezer and take however many I need, pop them into a tin to proof again then on to the oven. I love this dough! Thank you,thank you, thank you.

      • Gemma Stafford on October 19, 2017 at 5:45 am

        Hi there,
        I am marking this BIG TIP. That is really using you loaf, pardon the pun!
        Thank you for sharing this tip with all of the Bold Bakers, I rally appreciate it,
        Gemma 🙂

  17. Nuwaira Al Munifi on October 15, 2017 at 12:29 pm

    Hi Gemma, I am from Kuwait, We do a lot of pastry recipes. I really loved this recipe as it does not have oil. I made pizza, plain bread and some I topped with cheese. It was delicious and tasty. Everyone loved them. Thank you and continue posting great recipes.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 16, 2017 at 2:52 am

      Thank you Nuwaira, it is great that you are baking with us.
      It is so lovely to have Bold Bakers all over the World, I fee lucky!
      Gemma 🙂

  18. CarolineR on October 15, 2017 at 11:52 am

    Hi Gemma,

    Love your videos and recipes! My first attempt at crazy dough worked a treat, yummy, soft and rose beautifully. I have vegan guests coming over for lunch… do you think it would work if I omit the egg and substitute the yogurt with coconut yogurt, and the butter with margarine?

    Thanks in advance (from Sydney, Australia)

    Caroline

    • Gemma Stafford on October 16, 2017 at 2:56 am

      Hi Caroline,
      Yes! this type of bread is slightly enriched, but it can be varied, considerably really. It is worth experimenting with this!
      Gemma 🙂

  19. Karen Kilpatrick on October 11, 2017 at 10:17 am

    Good Morning Gemma!
    I just got back from the grocery store and had to buy CAKE yeast as they were out of my usual dry yeast. How do I use this? Do I dilute it somehow or use it whole? My bread-lovers are waiting. ha ha. If they knew how easy it is to bake your bread…… Also have you heard of Kerry Gold butter? it claims to come from Ireland. It is good but I’m skeptical of its origin.

    • Gemma Stafford on October 12, 2017 at 4:24 am

      Hi Karen,
      For some reason, maybe your name, I thought you were Irish! Kerrygold is an iconic Irish brand, one of the very first big export dairy success stories in Ireland. Perhaps actually the first big branding success too, from the 1960’s, I think. So, yes, grass fed animals give this butter its lovely yellow color, and sweet taste. I am not a brand ambassador, though I sound like one, I love this butter!
      When oyu say ‘cake’ yeast, do you mean fresh yeast, in the form of a cake? If so you use 1/2 the quantity of this yeast. So if your recipe says 10g of dry, you need 5g of fresh. Then you sponge it, crumble it and add it to the blood temperature liquids, a touch of sugar, 1 tsp, and dissolve the yeast. stand it for 5 mins until a foam forms on top. then stir it through, and add to the dry ingredients. you are lucky to find it, it is not so readily available. It is perishible, but you can freeze what you do not use, in portions, as it can be expensive, and you do not want to waste it!
      If you normally use instant dried yeast than you reduce the fresh yeast to 1/4 of the usual quantity, you do not need to be slavish about it, a little more or less will not matter too much.
      Phew, I hope you got that, It was a long explanation!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Karen Kilpatrick on October 12, 2017 at 4:49 am

        I am American made with Irish parts. My paternal grandfather was from Cork and migrated here in 1893. I agree about the butter. The taste is so buttery and creamy that I find I don’t use as much due to sensory overload. As for the yeast… it comes in little one ounce foil wrapped cubes. The cost is dear so I’m thrilled I can save it even though I bought a dozen just so I wouldn’t run out. Thank you for all the information. We must be kindred spirits as I too am left-handed, my birthday is Jan. 18th, I have greying red hair, brown eyes and I LOVE that butter.

        • Gemma Stafford on October 13, 2017 at 4:05 am

          Hi Karen,
          I did a little edit to your comment though It really made me laugh!
          I have Cork connections too, my Mum was born there, and we still have relatives living there. Cork is know as ‘The Real Capital’ of Ireland, as Cork people really think a lot of themselves!! and rightly so I say, lol. So many people landed in the US during that period of time, Kevin also has Irish ancestry from then, and his people originally landed in Canada, and drifted south.
          Yes, left handed, as is most of my family. It seems to be a creative thing, somehow. So kindred spirits it is. It is great to have you with us,
          Gemma 🙂

  20. Jade on October 10, 2017 at 12:51 pm

    Dear Gemma,

    I’m in love with the crazy dough!! I’ve baked cinnamon buns, cheese bread (I added sunflower seeds to it too), almond marzipan twist (instead of Nutella), stuffed bread and all turned out amazing! So easy and so good. Thank you! Xxx

    • Gemma Stafford on October 11, 2017 at 3:27 am

      hi Jade,
      Good job!
      Thank you for sharing your ideas with us. We learn from each other here at BBB.
      Gemma 🙂

  21. Anna on October 8, 2017 at 12:53 pm

    This sounds like a very interesting recipe. I have been baking for at least 5 decades, However, I’ve never heard of “proofing”, would you please explain this and the steps for it? I want to understand everything perfectly before I begin any new recipe.
    Thank you!

    • Gemma Stafford on October 8, 2017 at 2:56 pm

      Hi Anna,

      proof is just letting the bread dough rise. that’s all 🙂

  22. Çhaí Mã on October 4, 2017 at 4:59 am

    hi , can i substitut the plain yogurt with something else ? and thank u in advance

  23. mala on September 30, 2017 at 7:47 pm

    Can i use whole wheat flour

    • Gemma Stafford on September 30, 2017 at 8:32 pm

      yes you can 🙂

  24. ladysj on September 30, 2017 at 10:53 am

    I love sourdough bread is there a way to make this into a sourdough bread?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 30, 2017 at 9:10 pm

      Unfortunately sourdough is a whole other recipe altogether.

      I’ll try and do it in the future.

      Gemma.

  25. LadyIreland on September 29, 2017 at 1:23 pm

    HI Gemma:
    You have given me the courage to try to make eclairs again and again I get soggy bottoms even before I fill them. What am I doing wrong? They look wonderfully golden brown, light and airy but soggy bottoms. Help! My son is coming from Oregon for a visit and they are his favorite.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 30, 2017 at 4:52 am

      Hi,

      So, once baked and golden brown leave them in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave them in there for around 15 minutes. This will help dry them out and you shouldn’t get a soggy bottom after this.

      I hope that helped. 🙂

      • LadyIreland on October 8, 2017 at 3:49 pm

        Success!!! No more soggy bottoms. But I do have a MAJOR problem. Since I have been happily baking away…I’ve gained 25 pounds! I may need an intervention. My latest was pizza that I sprinkled garlic powder on the crust after I brushed it with melted butter. DELISH! Will try to send pictures but these new fangled smartphones are a challenge

        • Gemma Stafford on October 8, 2017 at 7:54 pm

          wow!! Listen I feel you. It’s just more to love.

          Delighted you had success 🙂

  26. Celine on September 28, 2017 at 6:16 am

    Gemma thank you so much for this recipe! I was so afraid to make doughs and such but now that I tried you recipe it was so easy!!! Btw how long can the dough stay if it is in the freezer? Thanks gemma love lots :))

    • Gemma Stafford on September 28, 2017 at 7:40 am

      Hi Celine,
      That is great! it is so easy when you know how.
      You can freeze the dough for quite some time, however a few weeks will be best. Unwrap it as quickly as you can, then proof it for baking.
      Gemma 🙂

  27. Chiqui on September 27, 2017 at 6:37 pm

    Hi Miss Gemma,

    I’m not really new to baking but I’m still on a learning process 🙂 and i wonder why my bread turns, sometimes rock hard once they cool 🙂 but they are soft when they’re still hot.
    Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 28, 2017 at 1:39 am

      Hi there,
      This sounds like a proofing problem. I presume that you are using the same type of flour, and other ingredients as per the recipe.
      A whole meal flour will give a different result, if is is not formulated for yeast baking. Other than that do proof the dough sufficiently, this is what develops the gluten in the flour, to give a good soft crumb to the bread. Take a look back at some of the bread videos here, you will see what you are looking for in a well made dough.
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Chiqui on September 28, 2017 at 6:45 pm

        thank you so much, guess practice makes perfect 😉 gonna have to practice some more 🙂

        • Gemma Stafford on September 29, 2017 at 2:38 am

          This is true, experience is a great teacher, and mindful baking, taking note of what is happening as you work, is great for your health too, so win win!
          Gemma 🙂

  28. Kiki Damayanto-Amar on September 24, 2017 at 8:59 pm

    Hi, Gemma. Sorry if I ask too many questions 😊
    I tried the recipe, I made pizza, Nutella & focaccia. It tasted so good, but everytime I made the recipe the color didn’t turn golden brown like yours. I always followed your recipes (I used oven thermometer too). Do you have any suggestion for this? I baked the longer time when I baked focaccia but it turned hard, especially when the bread got cool.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 25, 2017 at 2:30 am

      Hi Kiki,
      can you tell me what your oven is? The type of oven I mean. This sounds strange, in a convection oven, set to the correct temperature, this bread would bake!
      do let me know, we will figure it out,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Kiki Damayanto-Amar on September 25, 2017 at 5:34 am

        Mine is a conventional oven. Is there any difference? It always turned well if I baked cakes or cookies.

        • Gemma Stafford on September 26, 2017 at 10:17 am

          Hi Kiki,
          It is a bit odd! If the thermostat is operating, then you should not have a problem with these recipes, especially if it generally working well for you.
          I am mystified. The only thing I can think of is that your setting is slightly off. Turning up the temperature may be sufficient to resolve the problem.
          I hope this is of help to you,
          Gemma 🙂

          • LadyIreland on September 26, 2017 at 10:53 am

            ARE YOUR BAKED GOODS NOT BROWNING THE SAME AS THEY DID IN YOUR OLD OVEN?
            Your oven will have either a bake element visible on the floor of the oven or hidden under the oven cavity. An unseen element means you have a Hidden Bake element.

            OVENS WITH A VISIBLE BAKE ELEMENT:
            Adjust the rack closer to the element to shorten the time food takes to brown on the bottom. Lower the rack from the #3 position to the #2 position.

            NOTE: Shiny pans reflect heat. When using shiny pans, it may be necessary to move the pans closer to the heat source(refer to chart below).

            DO YOU HAVE A HIDDEN BAKE ELEMENT?
            Your oven will have either a bake element visible on the floor of the oven or hidden under the liner. The one hidden under the liner is the Hidden Bake element.

            Hidden elements offer a buffered heat. Reposition the rack closer to the bottom of the oven cavity to move the food proportionately closer to the element. Lower the rack to the #2 or #1 position.

            NOTE: Shiny pans reflect heat. When using shiny pans, it may be necessary to move the pans closer to the heat source(refer to chart below).



          • Gemma Stafford on September 27, 2017 at 1:46 am

            Wow!
            This is really good advice.
            the only thing I can add to this is that if there is a fan, then the position of the racks is not so important. Usually in a fan assisted oven the bottom element is concealed.
            Well thought out, thank you, I will share this again!
            Gemma 🙂



  29. John on September 22, 2017 at 3:02 pm

    Can I use bread flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 23, 2017 at 7:48 am

      Yes you can, John. Just note you might need a little more or less water as bread flour absorbs differently to ap flour so just don’t add in all your liquid at once.

      Happy Baking!

      • Deepz on October 26, 2017 at 12:43 am

        Could you please share the ingredients of bread flour?

        • Gemma Stafford on October 26, 2017 at 7:31 am

          Hi there,
          All-Purpose Flour is your go-to kind of everyday flour, with a protein content that can range from 9 – 12%. Unbleached flour tends to have a higher protein content, and it is definitely a better choice compared to bleached. The gluten content varies with the harvest season, region of production, freshness, and many other factors.
          Bread Flour is a high gluten flour which contains about 13% protein, and it is, of course, best for bread.
          Pastry Flour is a finer, lower gluten kind of flour that is best suited for sweet baked goods like cakes and cookies. It has a very soft texture.
          Cake Flour is even finer and lower in gluten than pastry flour. It might be good for baked goods that need an especially soft and fluffy texture and do not need to withstand a long proofing process.
          Self-raising Flour should just be left in the shelf where it stands. If you want great results in baking, learn how to use and measure your own yeast and baking powders.
          If you look at this list you will see that there is little difference between plain/all purpose flour and bread flour. Adding vital wheat will bring up the glute, but it is not really necessary.
          I hope this is of help to you.
          Gemma 🙂

  30. Karen Kilpatrick on September 21, 2017 at 12:17 pm

    Gemma I make this bread on a daily basis as neighbors, friends and loved ones seem to know when I put it in the oven! Is there a way I could make enough dough to make 6 loaves at a time? I’ve also been known to add Jalapeno peppers to your cheesy bread and WOW. I form them into hamburger size rolls and when baked and cooled I split them horizontally, spread a little mayo and make a sandwich of roast beef, tomato and swiss cheese. Heaven has come down to earth.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 3:01 pm

      Hi Karen,
      Your idea for this bread sounds divine! I will have to try it.
      Yes, you really can make this as a large batch, as long as you can handle it. Perhaps two triple batches may be easier to manage, in terms of mixing it, and proofing it too, it will meed a large container, and a large working surface too. You will exactly triple it, all of the ingredients, including the yeast. Try one large batch, once the dough is mixed you can break it down into more manageable portions to work with. A plastic washing up bowl, saved for this purpose, is a great bowl for a large batch of dough. My Mum uses, and re-uses a large turkey cooking bag as a proofing bag!
      hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

      • LadyIreland on September 21, 2017 at 3:23 pm

        What a great idea to use a turkey bag!! Thank you. I also have another question. I LOVE, LOVE , LOVE your best ever banana bread. However I’m not fond of the bits of oatmeal. Could I substitute some of the flour with oat flour and achieve the same results?

        • Gemma Stafford on September 22, 2017 at 8:47 am

          hi there,
          Yes! that will work perfectly, do watch the liquids though, the finer flour will absorb the liquids in a different way.
          Carry on baking!
          Gemma 🙂

  31. Anna on September 20, 2017 at 11:30 pm

    Gemma, such a great recipe! Will try it in the next days! Just one question -if I want to freeze the dough or keep it in the fridge a couple of days, should I proof it first? I’ve always frozen only already baked things 🤔 Thanks a lot! //Anna

    • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 12:47 am

      Hi Anna,
      Great question!
      1. If you want to freeze the dough it will be best to proof it first, just the first proofing. Then get it into the shape you wish to bake it in. If you want to make pizza for instance then portion the dough, wrap each piece well and bag the pieces for freezing. When you remove it from the freezer remove the wrap as soon as it is possible to do so, then cover the dough and proof the second time before baking. flat breads do not need so much proofing, so as soon as you can stretch them out, they are really ready to go.
      2. You can keep this dough in the fridge, in fact you can proof it in the fridge for quite a ling time. Here you will get it moving at room temperature, and then cover down the bowl, and refrigerate for a few days. If this is your intention then the no knead dough will be a great alternative for you. You can check them out here. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/best-ever-pizza-dough/) if you pop the term ‘no knead’ into the search bar you will be offered a great selection.
      Long cold proofing will change the flavor and texture of a dough, it is fermented over the time, and develops a sour doughg type flavor. Do try this too, you will not believe how easy it is!
      Thank you for being here with us, submit a photo of your bread when you are done!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Anna on September 22, 2017 at 2:24 am

        Hi Gemma, I have something to report: I’ve just made pizza with the crazy dough (I’ve saved your no-knead pizza, but I’ve already made buttermilk for the crazy dough, so I opted for this one now), I did keep it in the fridge for ilke 24 hours, after 2 hours’ proofing, and it was AMAZING. I had to punch down the dough a couple of times even in the fridg e, then let it sit at room temperature for 30 min (just like you say with the no-knead dough), and then rolled out for pizzas. the dough was BEAUTIFUL, full of those lovely bubbles, and tastes just gourgeous. What I love especially is that I have no yeasty taste in the baked good (I am crazy about bread-making, but I often get this yeasty taste in finished bread, no idea why). I’m a huge fan now, really. Maybe my notes here will be of help to other bakers, too. Thank you, Gemma, for the recipe! //Anna

        • Gemma Stafford on September 23, 2017 at 5:41 pm

          That message made me very happy. I’m delighted to hear you liked it Anna. Thank you for your comment and for being apart of the BB community 🙂

          Gemma.

  32. chitvillegas on September 19, 2017 at 10:50 pm

    Hi Gemma…am proofing this recipe right now. My question is can yogurt be substituted in the future? What does it do in bread recipe? Thanks…ever grateful to you”

    • Gemma Stafford on September 20, 2017 at 2:14 am

      Hi Chit,
      well done you!
      Yes you can use buttermilk in place of the yogurt. There is a science to baking, and in this case it is to do with an alkaline acid balance. This is known as a ‘quick dough’ and it all helps to improve the raising of the dough. It is about time really.
      I wish you much success, and thank you for being here with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  33. Kristi on September 19, 2017 at 5:38 pm

    Hello Gemma!
    This might sound really dumb, but I just tried to make the dough and it came out super sticky. It was really difficult to even get it off my hands. Is is supposed to be like that or does it need to be fixed? Also, how do I fix it if necessary? Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 20, 2017 at 2:47 am

      Hi Kristi,
      No, it is not supposed to be that sticky! I think something wrong with your measurements. When you are adding the liquids to any dough, you really need to add it carefully. Flour in different places absorbs liquid in different ways, depending on how, where ,when and the type of wheat being milled. It takes very little extra to go from too little to too much. So, next time add 3/4 in one go, then the remainder slowly, until the dough comes together in a clean ball, then stop!
      You can fix this one, pour a good amount of flour onto the table, a couple of ounces, and dump the dough on to this. Then you fold it through, it will happen really quickly, then proceed as per the recipe.
      Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Kristi on September 21, 2017 at 1:34 am

        Thank you for the response Gemma! I ended up with a really great cheesy garlic bread AND a delicious cinnamon and raisin bread! I also wanted to say thank you for your wonderful videos and posts. I’ve always had a love of cooking and baking but lately my depression has been making it difficult to even make a microwavable frozen meal. After watching a bunch of your videos, I’ve found myself back in the kitchen and totally loving it!! I know I’m probably way over sharing here, but I just wanted to say thank you for the inspiration to get out of bed and get back to doing something I love!

        • Gemma Stafford on September 21, 2017 at 2:30 am

          Hi Kristi,
          No, not over sharing, we do not do enough of this!
          Baking is a great mindful activity, and at the end of it you have something good to eat, so win win.
          When you are baking you do not have time to ruminate, you become absorbed in your task, and get away from the stresses of life. You are also learning something by doing, and this is very good for our hearts and heads!
          Thank you for your lovely comments here, they will be of help to others,
          Gemma 🙂

  34. Manu on September 18, 2017 at 7:41 pm

    Can you please tell some tips on how to always work perfectly with yeast
    Please🙏🙏

    • Gemma Stafford on September 19, 2017 at 1:24 am

      Hi Manu,
      The substitute you use for eggs in a recipe will depend on the recipe! Check out the chart here on the website. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/egg-substitutes-for-baking/).
      The type of yeast you use will dictate how you use it. If you use a dried yeast, and this is the most readily available, it is important to read the pack. Some are designed to go straight into the flour, and are mixed with the liquids for proving. Others are sponged, that is they are mixed with the warm/blood temperature (that means you should barely feel the mixture, neither hot or cold, with your finger). You always add the yeast to the liquids, not the other way around. Stir it through, and allow it to stand. A foam/sponge will form on top of the liquid, this is proof that the yeast is good, alive, and that it will work in your bake.
      Here is a reply I formulate for this frequently asked question:
      What type of yeast should I use, why does my dough not rise?
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      I do hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Manu on September 19, 2017 at 6:29 pm

        Thanks for you kind reply😃
        Will surely gonna give it 2nd try with your tips!!

  35. Klara on September 18, 2017 at 5:53 am

    Can I use fresh yeast instead of dried yeast? How much then?
    🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on September 19, 2017 at 2:41 am

      Hi Klara,
      Here is an explanation of yeast, it is worth learning about this.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast, which is about 2 teaspoons).
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      I hope this is of use to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  36. SANTA V DEL ANGEL on September 16, 2017 at 9:27 pm

    What if the dough doesn’t want to rise after 2 hours? What did I do wrong? =(

    • Gemma Stafford on September 17, 2017 at 3:34 am

      Hi there,
      Really? This may have something to do with the type of yeast you used.
      I need a little more information to help. did you sponge the yeast in the liquids before adding to the flour?
      Did it form a foam/sponge? What did you do with the salt? does the dough look too dry?
      What is the temperature in your room?
      all of these things matter!
      Gemma 🙂

  37. Mariely on September 15, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    Hi! Gemma

    Can I used white whole wheat instead of white plain flour?
    Can I make bagels with this recipe?

    Thanks,
    Mariely Q

    • Gemma Stafford on September 16, 2017 at 8:53 am

      Hi there,
      I do not know what white whole wheat is! I use wheat flour usually. Plain/all purpose flour is wheat flour.
      Whole wheat has the bran, and the wheat germ intact in the flour, and looks brown.
      You can use a mix of whole wheat, and all purpose flour in this recipe. the gluten is less available in wholewheat flour, though some have added vital wheat to boost the gluten.
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

  38. Luna on September 13, 2017 at 4:02 pm

    Hi Gemma, What would happen if I added butter to the dough, or is that not recommended? Thank you!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:02 pm

      So Luna, you can add i butter if you like. I don’t recommend adding in an ingredients like that because it could change the final product.

      What my mum does is grate frozen butter and cheese and folds it into a bread dough. It’s awesome and buttery.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  39. Bharti on September 13, 2017 at 11:00 am

    Hi Gemma
    I wanna try it for buns..
    Before starting off, I wanted to ask you, if I can use this dough (without egg ) with 24 hour proof method! I mean no kneading at all, just like your No Knead Doughnuts!
    And if yes, can u plz tell me how many proofings more are required after these 24 hours!
    Thanks in advance

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:53 pm

      Hi Bharti,

      so yes you can do this no knead just like the doughnuts. Only one more proofing is needed and that is after you make your rolls. You will want to proof them for at least 45 minutes to 1 hour before baking them.

      Best,
      Gemma.

      • Bharti on September 15, 2017 at 12:27 am

        Hey thanks dear
        I thought, u missed reading my query, so have put the same query on YouTube too! Please ignore it!
        And thanks a bunch for answering my queries so patiently.
        Love

        • Gemma Stafford on September 15, 2017 at 2:57 am

          You are welcome Bharti, I get to all of the comments here, eventually! Some days I have more pressure on my time than others. It is great to have you baking with us,
          Gemma 🙂

  40. Ruqaiyah on September 13, 2017 at 5:21 am

    Hi there gemma
    I would like to make just a plain loaf using this recipe so after proofing i dont have a loaf tin to bake it in but i have a silicon loaf mould so will it work just the same or do i have to adjust the temperature of the oven as is it silicone instead of a tin Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 5:12 pm

      Hi,

      so you don’t have to adjust the temp, do the same. Just loaf a loaf free form and bake. Everything will be the same. 🙂

  41. Patty on September 13, 2017 at 3:06 am

    Hi Gemma,

    How do you device which temperature and heat to use when you want to make your own variation? I can see that all your different breads have different ones and if I want to play with this I’m not sure what to use?

    Love,
    Patty

    • Gemma Stafford on September 13, 2017 at 4:59 pm

      Hi Patty!

      do you mean temperature of baking? like 400oF?

      If so it is a sliding range for bread. if it’s a crusty bug loaf you want to be 400plus.

      Smalled things like dinner rolls, pretzels, anything that baking quite quickly you are roughly around 375F. I hope this helps. Regardless stay in and around this range.

      Gemma.

  42. Sophie on September 11, 2017 at 2:57 am

    Hi Gemma! can I use easy bake yeast?
    Thank you! Xx

    • Gemma Stafford on September 11, 2017 at 9:41 pm

      yes you can use that yeast, no problem 🙂

  43. Vicki A Hernandez on September 10, 2017 at 3:42 pm

    Hi Gemma I’m getting ready to make the crazy dough recipe but I have a question… Can it be 2% or 1% milk or does it have to be whole milk? Thanks so much can’t wait to try it and I already have stuff together to make all fruit Popsicles also

    • Gemma Stafford on September 11, 2017 at 2:04 am

      Hi Vicki,
      The milk is not so important, the difference between full fat milk (3.5%) and 1% is little enough. it is there to soften and slightly enrich the dough.
      Gemma 🙂

  44. Diane on September 9, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    Can I add extra sugar to dough if I want to make cinnamon rolls?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 10, 2017 at 3:24 am

      Hi Diane,
      yes, you certainly may, but it will not really be necessary if it is on the filling. If you mean that you are adding the cinnamon to the dough, then the extra sugar will be great, a handful of raisins, or dried cranberries would be good in this too.
      Gemma 🙂

  45. Luna on September 7, 2017 at 11:01 am

    Hi Gemma! Can I leave out the yogurt or would I have to substitute that with something like sour cream? Thanks!

  46. Nancy on September 3, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Hello Gemma

    Could I make just two plain loaves of bread with this dough…if so how would I go about it?

    With thanks – I love your videos – you make procedures so very clear and easy!!

    Nancy

    • Gemma Stafford on September 3, 2017 at 11:36 am

      Hi Nancy,
      You could make one good sized loaf per recipe.
      Proof the dough really well, that means leave it until it bubbles up, about triple in size. Do this in a warm place in a covered bowl. You can make a bigger batch by doubling up the recipe. When it is proofed turn it out onto a floured surface. Shape it, and if you are using a loaf tin place it in, cover the pan and proof it again. the dough should be about 3/4 of the way up the pan before you bake it. Then bake!
      This should work well for you. if it is your first time with yeast baking then take your time, you will soon be a pro!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Amanda on September 6, 2017 at 9:46 am

        Hi there,
        Can this dough be done or used in a bread making machine?
        Or do you have any recipes that can be used in a bread making machine from start to finish?

        • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2017 at 6:42 pm

          Hi Amanda,

          Yes it can. It will work well 🙂

  47. samiksha.anand on September 3, 2017 at 10:41 am

    HI GEMMA
    I WANT TO ASK YOU INSTEAD OF EGG WANT CAN WE ADD TO CRAZY DOUGH TO GIVE SAME SOFTNESS. WILL BE THANKFUL IF U REPLY

    THANKS
    SAMIKSHA

    • Gemma Stafford on September 3, 2017 at 10:50 am

      Hi there,
      you can use a flax egg if you wish, you will find the instructions for this on the egg substitution chart here (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/egg-substitutes-for-baking/). you can also leave it out! Add a touch more milk, or perhaps a little melted butter, and proof your dough until it is really spongy. this will do it for you. The egg is an enricher. milk, butter and extra sugar, if you like, will soften the dough for you, Gemma 🙂

      • samiksha.anand on September 17, 2017 at 9:22 am

        thanks gemma

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