Your #1 Online Baking Destination!


How to Make Clotted Cream

Save Recipe

My Clotted Cream recipe is creamy, buttery, and simple enough for anyone looking to make their own ingredients from scratch.


Hi Bold Bakers!

Beyond just giving you the recipes to bake Bold desserts, my goal is to equip each and every one of you with the know-how and techniques to bake with confidence anytime, anywhere. Once you learn the tricks of the trade and nail down these basics, it’s from there that you can really get creative and have fun in the kitchen.

My method for How to Make Clotted Cream is the real deal. After teaching you how to make your own ingredients, like Homemade Cream Cheese and Condensed Milk, it became obvious that you all are really excited about making everything from scratch, just like me! My decadent clotted cream recipe is just a 1 ingredient ride to heaven!

Clotted Cream vs. Double Cream

Clotted cream is a classic English spread that was invented in Devon England, and that’s why it’s often referred to as Devonshire cream (or Cornish cream). Somewhere between butter and whipped cream, it’s a cream with at least 35% butterfat that has then been cooked down, and after a very low and very slow period in the oven, the cream and fat rises to the top and is skimmed off. This is the clotted cream.

It’s similar in texture to creme fraiche, but the flavor is even more creamy and just ever so slightly on the sweet side. Double cream, on the other hand, is the liquid base of clotted cream BEFORE it has been cooked. This is used to make whipped cream and things of that nature but is not to be confused with what we’re making here.

clotted cream, clotted cream recipe, how to make clotted cream, make clotted cream, clotted cream substitute, making clotted cream, what is clotted cream, how to use clotted cream, clotted cream baking, clotted cream help

Why is my clotted cream yellow?

Do not be alarmed if you get cream on the yellow side. This is normal, especially for this homemade recipe. Due to the high amount of butterfat in the cream, the final product takes on a buttery pale yellow color, but I can assure you the flavor and texture of the cream will be perfect.

Why is my clotted cream runny?

My Clotted Cream recipe is made by cooking the cream in a very low oven for 12 hours, then allowing the cooked cream to set in the fridge overnight. After the milk solids separate to the bottom, what rises to the top is the clotted cream.

In this process, what’s left behind is a little liquid, similar to the whey you get when making homemade cheese. Do not be alarmed by this, and my suggestion is to gently spoon off the solid cream from on top and leave as much of the liquid behind as possible. The liquid left behind can be used to make my Irish Scones to accompany your clotted cream and jam.

Make More Ingredients From Scratch!

And don’t forget to follow Bigger Bolder Baking on Pinterest!

4.34 from 6 votes
How to Make Clotted Cream
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
12 hrs
Total Time
12 hrs 5 mins
 

My decadent Clotted Cream recipe is simple enough for anyone looking to make all of their own ingredients from scratch.

Course: Ingredient
Cuisine: Dessert
Servings: 3 cups
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
  • 2 pints (1 liter) heavy cream (not ultra pasteurized) high fat content
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat your oven to 175°F (80°C)

  2. Pour your cream into a large 9x14in oven safe dish. You want a dish with a large surface area so you get the most clotted cream. 

  3. Place in the center of the oven and bake for a full 12 hours. I know this is a long time, but once you taste it, it’s well worth it. I put mine in the oven overnight so it's ready in the morning. Note: Make sure your oven doesn’t switch off after a certain amount of hours. 

  4. After the 12 hours remove your dish from the oven. You will notice a bubbly, yellow surface. This is the clotted cream.

  5. Allow to cool at room temperature then cover and put in the fridge overnight for it to set. 

  6. The next day, spoon the firm clotted cream into a jar leaving the liquid that has separated behind. You can use this liquid in the making of scones. 

  7. Spread the clotted cream on scones with jam. Store your clotted cream in the fridge for up to 5 days. 

Watch the Recipe Video!

SUBMIT YOUR OWN PHOTOS OF THIS RECIPE

0 Images
Submit Your Photos
mug_logo_150
Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

Have you made a recipe? Share photos on my website or across social media with the hashtag #boldbaker.

And don't miss my NEW Bold Baking recipes and tips. Sign up for my weekly email newsletter.

44 Comments

Write a Comment and Review

  1. Amalie on March 18, 2019 at 11:36 am

    Can it be made with soy/oat cream?
    I am lactose intolerant and really don’t want to spend an evening at the toilet…😝

    • Gemma Stafford on March 18, 2019 at 11:55 am

      Hi i would not suggest that, i think this works best with regular cream.

  2. Lisa Cook on March 17, 2019 at 7:45 am

    Well, now I know what clotted cream is, lol. If I’m not able to use it all up, can I put the unused portion in the freezer?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 18, 2019 at 11:53 am

      Hi, yes extra can be frozen for up to 3 weeks. Enjoy!

  3. Mamaw J on March 6, 2019 at 12:38 pm

    I’m having trouble finding heavy cream that’s not ultra pasteurized. Do you have any suggestions? I really want to try this one. Your butter and biscuits are a huge hit in my house.

    • Gemma Stafford on March 7, 2019 at 2:51 am

      Hi there,
      This is a regional thing, where there is no dairy industry there is often no fresh dairy. UHT/Ultra Heated cream will not clot for you. I do not know where you live, so I do not know what to suggest, I am sorry,
      Gemmma 🙂

  4. Christine St.Pierre on March 1, 2019 at 8:28 am

    I am so looking forward to trying this for my brother who is arriving that I haven’t seen in over 10 years I love all your recipes I love your accent and you’re a sweet Baker. So glad I found you.

    • Gemma Stafford on March 1, 2019 at 1:14 pm

      AWW i am delighted to hear that! Thank you 😀

    • Christine St.Pierre on March 3, 2019 at 4:31 pm

      Well, my loving baby brother came and went with High Tea, your clotted cream and scones receipes in honour of our Scottish parents. We ate and laughed and made wonderful memories. Thank you for your excellent recipes, and helping make wonderful times for family’s.

      • Gemma Stafford on March 5, 2019 at 12:41 pm

        😀 It’s my pleasure!

  5. yvonne on February 17, 2019 at 12:49 pm

    Hi Gemma
    I had never had clotted cream, but was very intrigued and wanted to try this. So I had a very large ceramic baking pan, put 1 litre of heavy cream in my oven overnight for 12 hours. The next morning took it out, cooled it and put it in the fridge. After things had set overnight again, I then scooped off what seemed to be a hard crust, almost like melted butter that had hardened(about 2 cups of this). ON the bottom was not a liquid, but more like a thick creamy mixture(about 1 cup of this). It seems that being in the oven overnight and 250 mls of liquid has evaporated. I separated both out, put in separate containers, but the consistency does not seem like what you were describing. The thick layer is not spreadable and the other layer was not a watery liquid, but a creamy liquid. What did I do wrong? I don’t know what the consistency of clotted cream is suppose to be?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 21, 2019 at 10:26 am

      Hi there, it sounds like you actually did it correctly. The thick spreadable cream is the clotted cream. You can discard the liquid.

  6. Deirdre StLuke on February 13, 2019 at 9:22 am

    Could you do this in a slow cooker? I’m nervous about leaving my oven on for so long (silly, I know).

    • Deirdre StLuke on February 13, 2019 at 9:23 am

      Never mind. You already answered it.

    • Gemma Stafford on February 13, 2019 at 5:32 pm

      Yes! Lid off! Bold Bakers have already tried this and it worked beautifully.

  7. Lily117lover on February 12, 2019 at 4:24 pm

    Hi Gemma!

    Im new here.. I just wanna ask, can i cook the cream by steaming? I dont have neither oven or microwave.. Please help me! 😥 i really wanted to make this cream..

    • Gemma Stafford on February 12, 2019 at 4:38 pm

      Ah, im not sure about that, let me look into it!

  8. Sharon Tange on February 12, 2019 at 5:54 am

    Hi Gemma,

    Thank you for sharing all of your wonderful recipes. Can’t wait to make this I know you said this can be made in a slow cooker with the lid off (?) on low. How long should this cook for? And once’s its done, do I complete the last few steps as if I cooked it in the over. Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 12, 2019 at 10:00 am

      Hi, it cooks for the same amount of time. Enjoy!

  9. Lolly on February 11, 2019 at 3:13 am

    Hi Gemma
    Can you freeze clotted cream?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 3:41 am

      Hi Lolly,
      Yes! I cannot see any reason not to do it,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. Ruth Sos on February 10, 2019 at 10:12 pm

    I just love the simplicity and fail proof easy to follow thank you

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 3:26 am

      Thank you Ruth, it is an interesting thing, and common to many cultures too! delicious,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Paula on February 10, 2019 at 1:30 pm

    Could we do this in a slow cooker/crock pot?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 2:54 am

      Hi Paula,
      I think so, top off, overnight at a low setting, that should do it.
      Yes! (Yes, you can prepare this on the stove. There are versions of this in almost every culture in the world, prepared in different ways. The larger the pan the better as it will give a good surface area. A frying pan would be good for this. Pour the cream in, heat it through until barely simmering, then get the heat down as low as possible, and cook for about 1 hour. Allow to cool without moving, then transfer to the fridge without giggling it around to set. If you cannot refrigerate the pan, then allow it to get as cold as possible, scoop the top off, and refrigerate that, it will work.
      Gemma 🙂

      • Paula Cristina Martins Ferreira Santos on February 12, 2019 at 10:17 am

        Thank you for your reply and the comprehensive explanation. I just got a slow cooker and this would be a great way to try it. Cheers

        • Gemma Stafford on February 12, 2019 at 5:06 pm

          It’s my pleasure!

  12. Aiysha Jafri on February 10, 2019 at 12:58 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Originally from the UK but I’ve lived in the US for a decade and always try to find clotted cream for scones. Thank you for sharing the recipe and method. Which heavy whipping cream did you use?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 2:50 am

      Hi Aiysha,
      The cream which I use for most of my recipes is fresh dairy cream. This needs to be at least 35% fat content to whip well. This is from cows milk. It is a liquid product found in the chill cabinet in your store. It will spoil in a few days, even when refrigerated. It has no additives, it is just natural cream, skimmed from milk. You should find it in the dairy cabinet where you live, not a brand as much as Fresh Cream.
      In the UK you will get Double cream too, which is really high in fat, 49% or so! We do not see this so much here in the US.
      Thank you for being here with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Jackie on February 10, 2019 at 12:41 pm

    I just have a quick question, do you think this would work in a slow cooker set on low?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 2:48 am

      Hi Jackie, I do!
      I thin lid off will be best to allow the steam to escape.
      You can prepare this on the stove too. There are versions of this in almost every culture in the world, prepared in different ways. The larger the pan the better as it will give a good surface area. A frying pan would be good for this. Pour the cream in, heat it through until barely simmering, then get the heat down as low as possible, and cook for about 1 hour. Allow to cool without moving, then transfer to the fridge without giggling it around to set. If you cannot refrigerate the pan, then allow it to get as cold as possible, scoop the top off, and refrigerate that, it will work.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  14. Blackkitty on February 10, 2019 at 11:01 am

    This sounds delicious! Is there no way to prepare it on the stove? Our city has gas and gas ovens don’t go below 160°C.

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 2:31 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, you can prepare this on the stove. There are versions of this in almost every culture in the world, prepared in different ways. The larger the pan the better as it will give a good surface area. A frying pan would be good for this. Pour the cream in, heat it through until barely simmering, then get the heat down as low as possible, and cook for about 1 hour. Allow to cool without moving, then transfer to the fridge without giggling it around to set. If you cannot refrigerate the pan, then allow it to get as cold as possible, scoop the top off, and refrigerate that, it will work.
      Gemma 🙂

  15. Julie on February 10, 2019 at 10:44 am

    Hi Gemma! I cannot wait to try making clotted cream. I cannot believe you have never had it — it’s fabulous. You mentioned that you could use the whey in scones. Is it a one for one exchange with the milk??

    Thanks so much for all of you wonderful recipes and videos!!!

    Julie

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 2:11 am

      Hi Julie,
      Yes, delighted you like this recipe, it is one of the most requested recipes here on BBB.
      Yes, use the whey in any of your baking. This is slightly acid, and softens the gluten for a tender bake. You may need a little more milk with this, do not over wet the scone dough, it should be soft, not wet.
      Gemma 🙂

      • Julie Flynn on February 11, 2019 at 1:46 pm

        Thanks!

  16. Cherith on February 10, 2019 at 9:45 am

    Whenever Whipping cream is on sale David picks it ALL up and this is one of the best ways to use it up…With the scones of course. But biggest question here Gemma….Jam on cream????? or cream on jam???
    🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 1:59 am

      Hi Cherith,
      Yes, this is the big question, a bit like the pineapple on pizza conundrum!
      In Ireland it was jam first, in the UK cream first, with a dollop of jam, no explaining it!
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Roberta Churchill on February 10, 2019 at 9:22 am

    Have you tried this with coconut cream for the lactose intolerant?r

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 1:47 am

      Hi Roberta,
      No, I am not sure that it would work! I think if id works we will hear from a bold baker or two!
      Coconut cream is a different thing to a dairy cream, I am musing here, but I cannot see how it would work. Really what is happening is that the fat of the cream is being gently cooked, to release the whey/water content, this does not apply to coconut cream.
      Thank you, you got me thinking,
      Gemma 🙂

  18. Mary W on February 10, 2019 at 9:21 am

    The first time I made it (using ultra pasturized heavy whipping cream), it worked just fine as I left it in 14 hours and I put it into 2 brownie pans to cook overnight just so there was plenty of air space. HEAVEN! BUT, it must be eaten within 2 days or the flavor goes away and it seems a bit syrupy. I made it once more and only cooked for 11 hours and it didn’t work. The taste is so good that I love it just by a spoonful! I would love to use non-ultra pasteurized but that is not available in Florida that I have found. I think mine works fine but am sure the non-pasteurized would produce more and thicker clotted cream from what I’ve seen, I ended up with the wonderful (favorite part) yellow top and way more ‘whey’ which was thicker but did make delicious scones. I can’t wait to do this again and try it in mashed potatoes and truffles.

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2019 at 1:44 am

      Hi Mary,
      You should be able to get pasteurized cream in Florida, in the dairy cabinet, usually with the fresh milk. Here in LA it is knows as Heavy Whipping Cream.
      Thank you for telling us about your method, it is a good one, I think using the shallow pan helps here!
      Gemma 🙂

    • Charlotte S Childers on March 6, 2019 at 1:17 pm

      I live an hour and a half outside of Asheville, NC. None of the three grocery chains were able to order cream that was not ultra pasteurized. Ditto, either of the two health food stores. Finally, we drove to Asheville and went to Whole Foods. I paid 4.99 for a pint. I made half a batch and it turned out fine. After reading why pasteurized cream works and ultra pasteurized cream doesn’t I really didn’t want to take a chance on using the ultra pasteurized. Would love to find another source but am not holding my breath.

      • Gemma Stafford on March 7, 2019 at 3:04 am

        Hi Charlotte,
        Such a shame that natural dairy cream is not available widely in a country where there is a great dairy industry. Farmer’s markets can be a great place to find producers, do not give up, I bet there is a market close enough to you. Once you find your source, you will be delighted!
        Gemma 😉

Write a Comment and Review

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This