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3-Ingredient Strawberry Jam In The Microwave

3-Ingredient Microwave Strawberry Jam (And More Flavors!)

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My recipe for Easy Strawberry Jam turns making delicious jam into a crazy simple process.


Hi Bold Bakers!

Each Summer, when lovely berries and stone fruit come into season, I love the tradition of making jam! Homemade jam is an incredible way to make the most of all the strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries that fill the farmer’s markets and grocery stores.

Around this time of year, there is such an abundance of excess fruit that stores often freeze these berries — making them a freezer staple in my house, and the key to making homemade Strawberry Jam all year around. While the traditional method of making jam is a fun project, it is just that — a project.

My recipe for Easy Strawberry Jam (and more flavors!) turns making jam into a crazy simple process. With the assistance of my favorite kitchen appliance, my microwave, I make homemade jam with just berries, sugar, and lemon in no time!

What’s the difference between a jam and a jelly?

The difference between jam and jelly is really a matter of texture. Jelly has added pectin or fruit sugars which allow the mixture to set into a more gel or jell-o like texture. Additionally, jelly is strained of any seeds, skin, or fruit to form a clear fruit spread.

Jam, on the other hand (like my Strawberry Jam), is simply fruit and sugar cooked together into a thick glossy spread. Jam, unlike jelly, highlights the cooked fruit by keeping in the natural fruits seeds and chunks, which is always my favorite part!

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What other flavors/fruits will this Strawberry Jam Recipe work with?

This recipe is really just a super simple method I wanted to share and it doesn’t have to be Strawberry Jam!

The process of combining frozen or fresh berries or fruit with a bit of sugar and lemon can be used to make so many variations. While this recipe shows you how to make strawberry, raspberry, and blackberry jam, it really can be made with so many fruits!

[ What goes with this jam? Bake some bread with my Crazy Dough Recipe! ]

Be sure to check out the notes section of this recipe to see what fruits can be made into jam in the microwave. You will be astounded by how easy and tasty this jam recipe is. No matter what fruit or berry you use, the steps are: combine the frozen fruit, sugar, and lemon in a large bowl, then microwave for roughly 9-11 minutes. After this time in the microwave, the fruit will have broken down and a mixture will be a thick and sweet syrup.

Once popped into a jar in the fridge this jam sets up to be a glossy homemade jam you can enjoy any time of year.

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How long will these jams keep?

This jam will last in the fridge for 4-6 weeks. Since this jam is homemade, with way less sugar than the store-bought kind and absolutely no preservatives or colors, it doesn’t last for a year in your refrigerator door.

That said I highly doubt this jam will last very long since in my house it quite literally disappears as soon I whip it up.

Do I have to use the microwave?

No! If you don’t have a microwave, or would just rather not, you can always use your stovetop. Check the written recipe below for more detailed instructions.

Can I swap out the sugar?

Yes! For more information, check out my handy Sugar Substitutes Chart!

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4.92 from 23 votes
3-Ingredient Strawberry Jam In The Microwave
3-Ingredient Microwave Strawberry Jam Recipe (And More Flavors!)
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
15 mins
 

My Easy Strawberry Jam recipe turns making delicious jam into a crazy simple process in the microwave. Get recipes for Blackberry Jam & Raspberry Jam, too!

Course: Breakfast/Brunch
Cuisine: American
Servings: 1 Cup
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
Strawberry Jam
  • 2 cups (10oz/284g) strawberries *fresh or frozen
  • 1/4 cup (2oz/57g) sugar
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
Raspberry Jam
  • 2 cups (10oz/284g) raspberries *fresh or frozen
  • 1/4 cup (2oz/57g) sugar
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
Blackberry Jam
  • 2 cups (10oz/284g) blackberries *fresh or frozen
  • 1/4 cup (2oz/57g) sugar
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
Instructions
Microwave Jam Method
  1. In a large bowl combine the berries, sugar and lemon juice. Be sure to use an extra large bowl as the jam will bubble up in the cooking process and you don't want to lose any of the liquid, 

  2. Microwave on high for about 9-11 minutes. Check at the 9-minute mark and cook for longer if needed. This timing is based on my microwave which is 1200 watts so your timing may vary. When the jam is ready the berries :should be broken down and the mixture will form a thick shiny liquid. Note: The jam thickens as it cools so just in case you think your jam isn't thick enough just factor that in. 

  3. Transfer the jam to a jar or airtight container and refrigerate for 4-6 weeks. And be sure to sterilize your jar by washing thoroughly with soap and water and then microwaving for 45 seconds (without any metal lids, of course). Make sure both the jam and jar are cooled before storing.

Stove Top Method:
  1. Combine all ingredients in a small sauce pan. Simmer over medium-low heat for 7-10 minutes until the fruit is broken down and the mixture has thickened. 

  2. Transfer to a jar or airtight container and refrigerate for 4-6 weeks. And be sure to sterilize your jar by washing thoroughly with soap and water and then placing in the oven at 140°C / 275°F for around 20 minutes. Make sure both the jam and jar are cooled before storing.

Watch the Recipe Video!

Recipe Notes

* To make this jam using blueberries, apricots or peaches you can use this exact same method!

* If you want to use something other than sugar, check out my Sugar Substitutes Chart

 

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Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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73 Comments

Write a Comment and Review

  1. Sarahh on September 11, 2018 at 7:18 am

    Can’t wait to try it looks good

  2. CherryMaid on September 8, 2018 at 8:10 am

    I have been making jam for years so at first I wasn’t extremely excited, but as soon as I looked at the recipe I had to try it out. It has less sugar than most conventional jam recipes, so the fruit flavor comes through well. It is now a favorite. – Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2018 at 2:45 pm

      Really glad you like this idea. 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  3. Djaput on September 5, 2018 at 8:40 pm

    halo Gemma, will it work with oven? Ty

    • Gemma Stafford on September 5, 2018 at 9:31 pm

      Hi,

      Instructions to make it on the stove top are written in the post. Unfortunately I wouldn’t make it in the oven.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  4. Jack Cook on September 3, 2018 at 6:38 am

    Would crushed pinapple work?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 4, 2018 at 4:51 am

      Yes, I don’t see why not 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  5. Debbie Lessard on September 2, 2018 at 2:07 pm

    Hi Gemma, I’ve never made jam before but I was wondering if it is possible to can this recipe for longer shelf life. Thank you Debbie

    • Gemma Stafford on September 3, 2018 at 3:15 am

      Hi Debbie,
      Yes! you will need to follow the rules of canning though, make sure your jars are sterilized properly. It is best to keep this jam in a cool place too. If you have a big batch of jam to make the old way will be best. You can freeze this too.
      Thank you for being in touch, I hope you try it!
      Gemma 🙂

  6. Cupcake90 on September 1, 2018 at 7:31 pm

    I absolutely love strawberry jam I can’t wait to make this

    • Gemma Stafford on September 2, 2018 at 3:06 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, the taste of summer! Go for it,
      Gemma 🙂

  7. Deb on September 1, 2018 at 6:33 am

    Made the strawberry jam this morning. It was delicious!! Thank you for this easy and delicious recipe!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 1, 2018 at 7:29 am

      Great Deb, I am really happy to hear this, thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Amy Bonner on August 31, 2018 at 8:48 am

    This worked brilliantly! I made mine with apple and raspberry (I blended my apple with some lemon first, skin on for extra fibre) so it was like an apple, raspberry and lemon jam. We all love it! Way better than store bought and super easy and fun to make.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 1, 2018 at 11:10 am

      WOW!
      Amy, that is amazing, The apple skin and all will add the pectin too to set up the jam, perfection, well done you,
      Gemma 🙂

  9. Rebecca on August 29, 2018 at 8:10 am

    Wow I really would love to do this Recipe, I’ve grown a lot of rhubarb this year and I would love to make rhubarb jam. Can I do this with this recipe, thank you for your help

    • Gemma Stafford on August 30, 2018 at 2:43 am

      Hi Rebecca,
      Rhubarb is very low in pectin. It will need to be paired with a high pectin fruit to ensure setting. Oranges are often the choice, and ginger as a flavor.
      Pectin is a natural setting agent in many fruits. It tends to be highest in sour fruits, such as blackcurrants, the zest and peel of citrus fruits, apples, pears, crab apples, quince, gooseberries. You get the idea, sour things. The pectin needs the assistance of sugar to set up a jam. Some fruits such as strawberries, blackberries, peach, apricot, mango among others will need a little assistance to set. Lemon juice will help, as will other high pectin fruits. Blackberry with apple or blackcurrants for instance.
      You can sometimes buy sugar specifically for jam making, which has added pectin, or you can but a pectin powder. This helps with low pectin fruits.
      You can also make pectin, from the skins, cores and seeds of sour apples. Save these when making pies, and simmer the skins, cores and seeds, barely covered with water, for about 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, lined with cheesecloth and store in the fridge in a sterile jar, or freeze in an ice cube tray. This can be added to any jam to assist the set.
      Chia seeds/flax seeds and hemp seeds can also be used to set jam, and other foods too. Two tablespoons of chia seeds will set about two cups of chopped strawberries for instance. Chia and strawberries work very well together, and the flavor of the strawberries will stay bright.
      Low pectin fruits: apricots, blueberries, ripe cherries, some plums, peaches, guavas, pineapple, strawberries among others.
      High pectin fruits: Sour apples, lemons, limes, Valencia oranges, crab apples, cranberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, Redcurrants, some plums, quinces among others.

  10. Emma Wells Walsh on August 28, 2018 at 8:18 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    This is Emma Wells again…sorry I couldn’t reply to your comment about peeling the peaches, but it wasn’t let me, so new comment;)

    Okay, so my peach jam was thrown out:( I didn’t peel the peaches, but I did cut them up so that I could remove the pit and the rough skin surrounding the Pitt. I added two tablespoons of chia seeds that I tried to mash…didn’t seem to do much to them, but I tried;) And I then followed your microwave instructions with the Lemon and sugar. I have a lower wattage micro (900 watts), so I expected it to take longer, like the strawberries (which came out beautifully!), but it just never seemed to disintegrate to a liquid. I cooked it for about 20mins altogether. I tried to help it by mashing it, but nothing. It was so dry. I didn’t know if I should try to add some water…I don’t know, it just didn’t work and then my toddler got ill, so I had to leave it and when I came back it was just hard, so I threw it out.

    Any suggestions on what I can do for another go around? Peaches are in season out here and I would love to use them in a jam, but I don’t think I’m doing it right;) Thanks for all of your help and comments!!

    • Gemma Stafford on August 30, 2018 at 4:02 am

      hi Emma,
      I am wondering if the peaches were ripe enough. There needs to be sufficient juice to activate the chia. Lemon juice will help, and you could try the method for chia egg, 1 tablespoon of chia to 3 tablespoons of water and allow to bloom. That should help. You may need a little water if the peaches are a little under ripe. Barely ripe, when just right for eating should work best as these will release their juice better.
      Do try again, and I hope it works well for you,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Lucy Maligaya on August 27, 2018 at 9:45 pm

    Blackcurrants can use it alone to make jam?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 28, 2018 at 9:40 pm

      yes you can, it will work well.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  12. Kris on August 27, 2018 at 2:19 pm

    I used apples and it came out very well. I put it on a piece of sponge cake and covered it with whipped cream. It made a delicious and very fast dessert.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 28, 2018 at 9:43 pm

      I’m thrilled to hear that 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  13. tereiceokelley on August 27, 2018 at 9:25 am

    your recipes sound great. can not wait to try the Jam

    • Gemma Stafford on August 28, 2018 at 9:42 pm

      Delighted you like my jams 🙂

      Best,
      Gemma.

  14. Evelyn McGarry on August 27, 2018 at 7:34 am

    My question is about the jar sterilization process you mention in the recipe. The jars go in the oven at 275 degrees for 20 minutes. Are the jars dry or wet from washing them? And place the jars on a baking sheet? They won’t explode?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 29, 2018 at 9:41 pm

      Yes they can be wet and no they won’t explode. You don’t leave them in for very long.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  15. Emma Wells on August 26, 2018 at 9:39 pm

    Hi Jemma, as a follow up to your first reply about peaches. I got the chia seeds for my peaches and I’m good to go…I just have one follow up question…do I peel the peach first? Thanks so much and love all of your recipes! I have so many go to pantry finds because of you:)

    • Gemma Stafford on August 27, 2018 at 2:39 am

      Hi Emma,
      I would not peel the peaches, just give them a little scrub. A lot of the pectin in fruit is right there in the skin, and the skin of peaches will be light in the jam. If you decide to peel them then take the pits and the skin and simmer them together barely covered in water for about 30 mins and add this to your fruit, this will help set the jam too. There is such a thing as peach pit jelly too! who knew?
      There is also a fact about peach pits, they contain cyanide, but I think the balance of pits to skin and water negates this, it is not sufficient to worry about, but if you are concerned do not do it!
      I will be looking forward to hearing about your jam,
      Gemma 🙂

  16. Emoore65 on August 26, 2018 at 10:18 am

    Can I use this recipe with blueberries?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 27, 2018 at 3:45 am

      Hi there,
      Yes! blueberries are low in pectin, so you will need the lemon juice, and you may also need to add a high pectin fruit such as black currants, red currants etc.
      Read this little post on setting jam:
      Pectin is a natural setting agent in many fruits. It tends to be highest in sour fruits, such as blackcurrants, the zest and peel of citrus fruits, apples, pears, crab apples, quince, gooseberries. You get the idea, sour things. The pectin needs the assistance of sugar to set up a jam. Some fruits such as strawberries, blackberries, peach, apricot, mango among others will need a little assistance to set. Lemon juice will help, as will other high pectin fruits. Blackberry with apple or blackcurrants for instance.
      You can sometimes buy sugar specifically for jam making, which has added pectin, or you can but a pectin powder. This helps with low pectin fruits.
      You can also make pectin, from the skins, cores and seeds of sour apples. Save these when making pies, and simmer the skins, cores and seeds, barely covered with water, for about 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, lined with cheesecloth and store in the fridge in a sterile jar, or freeze in an ice cube tray. This can be added to any jam to assist the set.
      Chia seeds/flax seeds and hemp seeds can also be used to set jam, and other foods too. Two tablespoons of chia seeds will set about two cups of chopped strawberries for instance. Chia and strawberries work very well together, and the flavor of the strawberries will stay bright.
      Low pectin fruits: apricots, blueberries, ripe cherries, some plums, peaches, guavas, pineapple, strawberries among others.
      High pectin fruits: Sour apples, lemons, limes, Valencia oranges, crab apples, cranberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, Redcurrants, some plums, quinces among others.
      I hope this will help,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Kristen on August 25, 2018 at 6:37 pm

    Just picked up my 2 cases of Colorado Palisade peaches; love to try this recipe with my peaches, any advice?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 2:57 am

      Hi Kristen,
      Wow! lucky girl, what a lovely thing. I guess that you are canning some of these, so a little experiment with the jam will be interesting. Tell us how you get on with this.
      The issue with jam is in getting it to set, and this depends on PECTIN which is plentiful in some fruits, not so much in others. Peaches are low in pectin, and the riper they are the lower they are, SO! Here is a little explanation, not comprehensive, but a quick trip:
      Pectin is a natural setting agent in many fruits. It tends to be highest in sour fruits, such as blackcurrants, the zest and peel of citrus fruits, apples, pears, crab apples, quince, gooseberries. You get the idea, sour things. The pectin needs the assistance of sugar to set up a jam. Some fruits such as strawberries, blackberries, peach, apricot, mango among others will need a little assistance to set. Lemon juice will help, as will other high pectin fruits. Blackberry with apple or blackcurrants for instance.
      You can sometimes buy sugar specifically for jam making, which has added pectin, or you can but a pectin powder. This helps with low pectin fruits.
      You can also make pectin, from the skins, cores and seeds of sour apples. Save these when making pies, and simmer the skins, cores and seeds, barely covered with water, for about 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, lined with cheesecloth and store in the fridge in a sterile jar, or freeze in an ice cube tray. This can be added to any jam to assist the set.
      Chia seeds/flax seeds and hemp seeds can also be used to set jam, and other foods too. Two tablespoons of chia seeds will set about two cups of chopped strawberries for instance. Chia and strawberries work very well together, and the flavor of the strawberries will stay bright.
      Low pectin fruits: apricots, blueberries, ripe cherries, some plums, peaches, guavas, pineapple, strawberries among others.
      High pectin fruits: Sour apples, lemons, limes, Valencia oranges, crab apples, cranberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, Redcurrants, some plums, quinces among others.
      For the peaches I think you could try the chia/flax seeds idea. They will become gelatinous in liquid, and crushing them will help the process, you can do this in a pestle and mortar.
      I hope this helps, and I will be dying to hear how you get on,
      Gemma 🙂

  18. El on August 25, 2018 at 12:43 pm

    My microwave is 900W how long would it be ??

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 3:43 am

      Hi there,
      Microwave power levels do not equate to heat, but to time. It is worth understanding this. At full power the microwave is cooking at 100% of the time of the baking. At the lower levels it phases on and off, so at Medium high it is operating at about 75% of the time. At medium it will be 50%, etc. What is happening with the bake is that the heat, which is generated in the food, is allowed time to distribute. The defrost/low setting is on for about 30% of the time for instance, so that the food is not cooked, but defrosted. I hope this is not confusing, but it is worth thinking about it.
      So for your 900w microwave it will take a little more time, watch the video again and see how it works.
      The fruit matters too, a high pectin fruit will set up quicker than a low pectin fruit, but that is a different question!
      Gemma 🙂

  19. felekey5 on August 25, 2018 at 10:39 am

    Can frozen pitted cherries be used in this recipe? I am not sure if they have enough pectin?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 3:47 am

      Hi there,
      This is a great question, read this little article I prepared in relation to this:
      . Pectin is a natural setting agent in many fruits. It tends to be highest in sour fruits, such as blackcurrants, the zest and peel of citrus fruits, apples, pears, crab apples, quince, gooseberries. You get the idea, sour things. The pectin needs the assistance of sugar to set up a jam. Some fruits such as strawberries, blackberries, peach, apricot, mango among others will need a little assistance to set. Lemon juice will help, as will other high pectin fruits. Blackberry with apple or blackcurrants for instance.
      You can sometimes buy sugar specifically for jam making, which has added pectin, or you can but a pectin powder. This helps with low pectin fruits.
      You can also make pectin, from the skins, cores and seeds of sour apples. Save these when making pies, and simmer the skins, cores and seeds, barely covered with water, for about 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, lined with cheesecloth and store in the fridge in a sterile jar, or freeze in an ice cube tray. This can be added to any jam to assist the set.
      Chia seeds/flax seeds and hemp seeds can also be used to set jam, and other foods too. Two tablespoons of chia seeds will set about two cups of chopped strawberries for instance. Chia and strawberries work very well together, and the flavor of the strawberries will stay bright.
      Low pectin fruits: apricots, blueberries, ripe cherries, some plums, peaches, guavas, pineapple, strawberries among others.
      High pectin fruits: Sour apples, lemons, limes, Valencia oranges, crab apples, cranberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, Redcurrants, some plums, quinces among others.
      for your cherries you have a choice, adding redcurrants/blackcurrants would boost the flavor, and add the pectin, and chia seeds would also work well without interfering with the flavor,
      Gemma 🙂

  20. DakotaRose on August 25, 2018 at 9:40 am

    I love this idea. My favorites are rhubarb jam/spread and anything with cranberries. I guess more sugar would be needed for the cranberries. Do these have enough pectin to make this quick jam?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 3:52 am

      Hi Dakota,
      Cranberries are full of pectin. These are a great addition to other fruits too to boost the pectin levels, in cherries/blackberries for instance. Think of cranberry sauce at Christmas time, it comes together really quickly. I think you may need to crush the cranberries a little when they soften, though maybe not, I did not try this. Other than that I think the sugar will be ok, it is an important part of the jam as the pectin will not develop without it.
      We used to have rhubarb with ginger! not sure why.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  21. Nichole Wish on August 25, 2018 at 2:02 am

    If you don’t have a lemon on hand , but have lemon juice that was already bottled ; how much of your bottled lemon juice do you use to make the jam?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 4:55 am

      Hi Nicole,
      Bottled lemon juice has less acid than from a fresh lemon. A lemon will have about 2 tablespoon per lemon, though some yield a lot more.
      A tablespoon of your juice will be sufficient, but it depends on the fruit.
      Read this little article I prepared about setting a jam, it will help: Pectin is a natural setting agent in many fruits. It tends to be highest in sour fruits, such as blackcurrants, the zest and peel of citrus fruits, apples, pears, crab apples, quince, gooseberries. You get the idea, sour things. The pectin needs the assistance of sugar to set up a jam. Some fruits such as strawberries, blackberries, peach, apricot, mango among others will need a little assistance to set. Lemon juice will help, as will other high pectin fruits. Blackberry with apple or blackcurrants for instance.
      You can sometimes buy sugar specifically for jam making, which has added pectin, or you can but a pectin powder. This helps with low pectin fruits.
      You can also make pectin, from the skins, cores and seeds of sour apples. Save these when making pies, and simmer the skins, cores and seeds, barely covered with water, for about 30 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve, lined with cheesecloth and store in the fridge in a sterile jar, or freeze in an ice cube tray. This can be added to any jam to assist the set.
      Chia seeds/flax seeds and hemp seeds can also be used to set jam, and other foods too. Two tablespoons of chia seeds will set about two cups of chopped strawberries for instance. Chia and strawberries work very well together, and the flavor of the strawberries will stay bright.
      Low pectin fruits: apricots, blueberries, ripe cherries, some plums, peaches, guavas, pineapple, strawberries among others.
      High pectin fruits: Sour apples, lemons, limes, Valencia oranges, crab apples, cranberries, gooseberries, blackcurrants, Redcurrants, some plums, quinces among others.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  22. Wah-Wei on August 24, 2018 at 7:54 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    The traditional recipe for jams are 1 kg fruits, 1kg sugar ( horror!), juice of 1 lemon, cook on stovetop.
    I have stopped cooking jam, my cumcuat tree is full, would love to make jam, but we have stopped taking sugar. How much Stevia can I use?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 5:08 am

      Hi there,
      How lovely to have kumquats (my spelling) growing in your garden.
      You cannot make jam with stevia!
      I think you can use an alcohol sugar, like xylitol/erythritol, but the pectin in the fruit needs a sugar in orger to set the jam, and Stevia/Monk fruit is not sugar.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  23. robbie1050 on August 24, 2018 at 1:17 pm

    Hi Gemma! It’s Robbie.😁
    I just bought an Air Fryer and it was delivered today. Now, I want to try and stay away from frying using oils, and I don’t want to use my oven either. Do you think that my baking skills could be put to use by using an Air Fryer? Can I still bake desserts only using the air fryer!?!

    • Gemma Stafford on August 26, 2018 at 5:17 am

      Hi Robbie,
      well done you, this is a great appliance.
      Yes, I think you can use this for lots of things, and small amounts too.
      My mum uses here for all sorts of things, but finds the temperature a bit on the high side for baking.
      You may need to start a bake at 180c/350f, then drop it back after a few minutes.
      Super for baked potatoes too, start them in the microwave, finish in the airfryer for crisp skin, and eat all of it!
      Start with things like scones, and crumble, and remember that if you have a microwave this wil lbe a perfect partner for this appliance, make it work for you!
      Gemma 🙂

  24. PBond.Pattti on August 24, 2018 at 11:22 am

    What type of sugar substitute do you recommend using. The reason I ask is because my brother is a diabetic

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 12:04 pm

      Hi there,
      I know this is a tricky thing for so many people, and a really important health concern.
      The problem is that the sugar in this type of recipe needs to react with the pectin in the fruit to set the jam.
      Some of the new age sweeteners, like Truvia/Lakanto/Swerve will do this well, sadly Stevia and Monk fruit will not, as far as I can see, yet these are super sweeteners for people with diabetes.
      Check out xylitol/erythritol, these are alcohol sugars from grains and fruits, and seem to work well for the jam, and for diabetes sufferers.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  25. Alice Hoerner on August 24, 2018 at 8:43 am

    This sounds great. How much lemon juice would I use if using lemon juice from the bottle? Thank you.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 9:00 am

      Hi Alice,
      The purpose of the lemon is to add pectin to the mix to set the jam, and a bright color and flavor to the fruit.
      Bottled juice is not so full of pectin, so a couple of tablespoons to the strawberry one, and the blackberry one and 1 tablespoon to the raspberry one should do it. Pectin is lower in some fruits than in others,
      Gemma 🙂

  26. Mary on August 24, 2018 at 6:27 am

    Hi gemma could I use pears what’s your thoughts thank you

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:15 am

      Hi Mary,
      Yes! pears are high in pectin, and you can help this by adding the skins, cores and seeds to a little water and simmer for a long time, perhaps about 30 mins. This will take the pectin from the skin and seeds and can be a big help when setting any jam, you can strain it and bottle it too, and you can use apple skins and cores for the same purpose.
      Use the pears when they are just edible, a little under ripe, that will be best.
      I hope this helps, adding chia seeds/flax seeds/hemp seeds to pears, or any low pectin fruit will also help set it up,
      Gemma 🙂

  27. Brenda on August 24, 2018 at 5:56 am

    Can this be frozen?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:27 am

      Brenda, this is a good question.
      Yes, it can be frozen, but if it is stored in a sterilized jar it will hold well for a long time in the fridge.
      I hope you enjoy this recipe,
      Gemma 🙂

  28. DEidre Holbrook Phillips on August 24, 2018 at 5:54 am

    JUst curious if you’ve ever tried with stevia for a lower sugar content recipe?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:31 am

      Hi DEidre,
      Stevia is a great thing, but it will not work so well in this type of recipe. That is because the sugar needs to react with the pectin in the fruit in order for the jam to set. Stevia/monk fruit will not do this. Alcohol sugars such as xylitol and erythritol may do it for you, I think they will as these sugars will caramelize, like sugar.
      You can research these, they are generally made from alcohol extracted from fruits and grains.
      I hope this helps,
      Gemma 🙂

  29. Rinza on August 24, 2018 at 1:02 am

    Hi Gemma,
    Can I be able to make mango jam using this recipe? And I have one more question. Should this be made in a toaster oven?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 5:28 am

      Hi Rinza,
      I am not sure about mango for this recipe. Mango is often stewed in some cultures, where it is easily grown, so that is step one. The problem is with getting it to set. It could be set with crushed chia seeds/flax seeds or hemp seeds, these are high in protein and gelatinous and should set the jam. This will be an experiment for you, but it is worth it. Choose mango which are just ripe, not over and try it!
      Let us know, that will help others,
      Gemma 🙂

  30. Angel on August 24, 2018 at 12:31 am

    If we use honey instead of sugar.is it good , because heating honey is not good right? Especially microwave.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 5:30 am

      Hi Angel,
      I would not choose to use honey for this recipe, and you are right, it is best not to microwave it, it affects the flavor and nutrition.
      The sugar is important here as it reacts with the pectin in the fruits to set the jam.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  31. Maureen Wolfaard on August 23, 2018 at 9:28 pm

    Please Gemma I want your opinion about AIR FRYERS!
    It makes sense to me to enable cooking, frying, and baking.
    This small ‘oven’ appeals to me for a single person economically.
    Will it BAKE like an conventional oven?

    Many thanks indeed.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 5:38 am

      Hi Maureen,
      My mum has an air fryer and she would not be without it. It is brilliant for small roasts, quick re-heating and browning, potato chips, sausages, chicken pieces, duck legs, pasta bakes etc.
      I do not think she has baked in this, but provided you get the temperature right I cannot see why not. I think most of these will have good instruction books, and these should have recipes. Take a look online at the brand you are interested in, I bet they will offer advice.
      I do know that my mum said the one she bought was almost too small, and she will get a bigger one when it is worn out! That says a lot as she is not a gadget person,
      Gemma 🙂

  32. Chit on August 23, 2018 at 7:24 pm

    Hi gemma…can i use dried fruits?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 5:49 am

      Hi Chit,
      I never have, but that does not mean it cannot be done. I think you may need to soak the figs in a little water first to hydrate them,about a cup of water to 6ozs whole dried fruit, and cook them in this water too. This I think would work too for apricots/cherries perhaps even mango.
      You will need pectin, a whole lemon juiced with do this for you, and a 1/2 cup of sugar too, but I am imagining the recipe, you can try it and let us know how it works.
      Gemma 🙂

  33. Mary on August 23, 2018 at 11:21 am

    Thanks for such an easy jam would it work with pears

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:40 am

      Hi mary,
      I think I got to this earlier, and the answer is yes! Pears are high in pectin,
      Gemma 🙂

  34. irena c. on August 23, 2018 at 10:46 am

    Hello, I use often frozen fruits since they are available year around and put them straight up ( frozen) in microwave with 2 tbsp starch ,no sugar.It bubbles and thickens nicely and is not really sweet but if needed,honey can be added on top.Mainly goes for oatmeal cobblers and baking but will do fine on pancakes/waffles if carbs are not a problem.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:43 am

      Hi Irena,
      Yes! My mum does this too, and it is delicious with Greek yogurt, granola and honey, yummy!
      Frozen berries are great, and good value too, and wonderful to have them to hand when we need them. The sugar tends to preserve it too, so has that purpose, but using it up is the best plan, thank you for this,
      Gemma 🙂

  35. Brenda on August 23, 2018 at 10:25 am

    Can this jam be frozen? Would there be any changes to recipe?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:48 am

      Hi Brenda,
      Yes, it could be frozen. When stored in an airtight sterilized pot this will keep well for a long time in a cool place.
      I do not think freezing this will really affect it, but it may need a stir when removed,
      Gemma 🙂

  36. Loveon on August 23, 2018 at 10:10 am

    Hi Gemma,

    I would love to try your jam recipes. However, I do have a question. Hope much juice (lemon) would you use, if you didn’t use 1/2 lemon.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:49 am

      Hi there,
      About one tablespoon. I say fresh lemon because the pectin is higher straight from the fruit.
      Gemma 🙂

  37. Edna M WALKER on August 23, 2018 at 9:33 am

    Can I use quince in this recipe. I usually get many quinces from my quince tree and don’t know what to do with so much.

    • Gemma Stafford on August 24, 2018 at 8:52 am

      Hi Edna,
      Yes! quince is very high in pectin, and wil lwork really well in this jam, lucky you!
      Store in sterilized sealed jars, add the jam when still warm to the hot jar, then allow to go cold before sealing. Store in a cool dry place,
      Gemma 🙂

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