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3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread

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My 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread recipe will give you everything from breakfast burritos to wraps, to little personal pizzas!


Hi Bold Bakers!

Sometimes, if you haven’t pursued alternative baking before, it might feel like the only way to cut the sugar and the carbs is by entirely eliminating your favorite sweets and baked goods. Well, from Gluten-Free Chocolate Cupcakes with Sugar-Free Frosting to my Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies, hopefully, I’ve shown you that with just a few swaps you can bake up a storm and still feel great about your diet and nutrition.

I’m so excited to be giving you guys the tools to take your favorites and reinvent them.

One of the first things we think we need to eliminate from our diet to get healthier is bread. While cutting back on carbs and gluten can be good for you, you do not need to give up on light fluffy and savory bread! The recipe for my 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread is made with things you likely have on hand if you’re into alternative baking, but you may never have combined before.

From breakfast burritos to wraps, to little personal pizzas, these versatile flatbreads are about to become one of your healthy staples!

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How to Make Almond Flour

One of the main ingredients in my 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread recipe is almond flour. This ingredient is what differentiates my flatbread from the wheat-based ones that are not the most friendly to a gluten-free or low-carb lifestyle.

For those that might not already know, almond flour is simply almonds ground into a fine powder and used as flour. It’s a great replacement as it has no gluten or wheat with the added value of fiber, healthy fat, and a lovely texture. If you can’t find almond flour at your local store, you can easily make it at home by following Gemma’s recipe for Almond Flour.

What is Tapioca Starch?

Tapioca starch is the other major ingredient in my flatbread recipe. Tapioca starch, made from dried ground cassava root, might sound unusual but it’s very commonly used as a way to add elasticity and chew to gluten-free baked goods.

This alternative flour works with the almond meal to bind the flatbread together. It also makes the flatbread nice and sturdy, perfect for rolling up burritos or wraps. If you can’t find tapioca starch, you can replace it with arrowroot flour or potato starch. I personally like tapioca starch the most as it has the most natural flavor and the lightest texture.

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Is the Consistency of Gluten Free Flatbread Different from Regular Flatbread?

The texture of my Gluten Free Flatbread is light and chewy with a nice crispness on the outside. I suggest serving this while still warm, as it really has a nice crust and nutty flavor.

Once cold or room temperature, the flatbread remains soft and fluffy but is slightly less crisp. I suggest making a batch and keeping them in the fridge. The next morning, just pop them in a frying pan with some scrambled eggs, bacon, and salsa, and BAM! You’ve got the tastiest gluten-free and paleo breakfast burrito in town!

So, consistency-wise, you’re getting as close as you can possibly get to a regular flatbread.

How Long Can You Store This Flatbread?

As mentioned, the flatbread is best when served fresh — but it does keep and reheat very well for up to 3 days. To store it, just cover it in an airtight container and place it in the fridge.

How to Serve 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread

The best part about my 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread recipe is that is can be used in so many ways.

From filled with avocado, tomato, and wrapped up for a vegan lunch, to dipped in creamy hummus, if you think it’s a good idea it probably is. I like them all on their own brushed with a little ghee and topped with fresh herbs. I encourage you all to get creative and serve dip or wrap these any way you want with your favorite things. Just when you thought bread wasn’t good for you… enjoy!

Looking for a regular Flatbread Recipe?

If you’re looking for a flatbread recipe with all purpose flour, yogurt, and baking powder, try Gemma’s Flatbread recipe with only 3 ingredients.

Get More Healthy Recipes!

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4.08 from 39 votes
3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flat Bread
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 

My 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flatbread recipe will give you everything from breakfast burritos to wraps, to little personal pizzas!

Course: bread
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6
Calories: 139 kcal
Author: Olivia Crouppen
Ingredients
  • 1 cup (4oz/115g) almond flour*
  • 1 cup (4oz/115g) tapioca starch*
  • 1 can (387g/13.6oz) coconut full fat milk*
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil, or ghee for frying
Optional add-ins:
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons (1oz/28g) butter, or ghee
  • fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl combine the almond flour, tapioca starch, salt and garlic — if using.

  2. Add in the coconut milk and whisk to combine until you have a smooth thick batter. 

  3. Heat a large non-stick pan over medium heat. Add in the coconut oil or ghee and allow to melt.

  4. Once the pan is at an even, moderate heat, spoon 1/3 cup of the batter into the pan, allowing the batter to spread out, it should be roughly an 8-inch circle (although you can make the flatbread large or smaller if desired).

  5. Cook the flatbread on the first side for about 3 minutes or until tiny bubbles begin to form around the outside. Flip the flatbread and allow to cook on the other side for about 1-2 minutes until golden and brown. Remove from the heat and transfer to a plate or rack. Repeat this process until all of the batter is used. This should make about 6 flatbreads.

  6. Serve the flatbread while warm and crisp. If desired, brush with butter or ghee and sprinkle over fresh chopped herbs. 

  7. Cover and store leftover flatbread in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. 

Watch the Recipe Video!

Recipe Notes

*The almond flour in this recipe cannot be substituted for another flour

*The tapioca starch can be substituted for arrowroot flour or potato starch, but my suggestion is you give tapioca starch a try. 

*If you want to use lite coconut milk, you can, but I prefer to use full-fat coconut milk 

Nutrition Facts
3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flat Bread
Amount Per Serving (1 flatbread)
Calories 139 Calories from Fat 81
% Daily Value*
Fat 9g14%
Saturated Fat 6g38%
Sodium 4mg0%
Carbohydrates 15g5%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 1g2%
Calcium 20mg2%
Iron 0.5mg3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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109 Comments

Write a Comment and Review

  1. Jacky on August 6, 2019 at 6:15 am

    Hi there! Many thanks for the fabulous recipes. I have been making my own Almond milk since becoming dairy intolerant and I am left with a large amount of ALMOND pulp at the end of it. Do you think I could use the almond pulp instead of almond meal in this recipe? I hate to waste food. I will also be substituting the coconut milk with almond milk due to coconut intolerance. 🙁

    I cant wait to make it for my coeliac daughter and for me!

    🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on August 7, 2019 at 3:20 am

      Hi Jacky,
      If you dry out the pulp, of almonds, coconut or any nut you will have a really useful thing. Spread it out thinly on a baking sheet and dry it overnight at the lowest setting of your oven. When it crumbles in your hand it is dry. Cool it, store it in a container in the fridge.
      You can use this as an ingredient in cookies, blend it to flour, coat things as you would with breadcrumbs, etc.
      If you can buy a dehydrator then that will be a very useful thing for you.
      Google this too, there are many good ideas out there for you, and this is a really useful thing for your daughter too. I agree waste food is awful, do what you need to do to use it up.
      Yes, I think you can use the pulp in this recipe, perhaps just as it is, then you may need to be careful about added liquid.
      Think about protein bites too, like a little truffle made with the pulp, it will be delicious and nutritious and a treat for your daughter.
      I can think of loads more! You will too,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Jacky on August 7, 2019 at 3:49 am

        Amazing! Thank you for the in-depth reply! You have given me some fantastic ideas. Many thanks. 🙂

        Jacky

        • Gemma Stafford on August 8, 2019 at 1:14 am

          Hi Jacky,
          you will soon be boldly baking GF treats for you and your daughter, no waste too, happy days!
          Gemma 🙂

  2. Teresa on July 27, 2019 at 5:10 pm

    Hi Gemma I can’t believe how great these turned out. I was wondering if tapioca starch is the same as tapioca flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 28, 2019 at 1:56 pm

      I’m thrilled to hear that Teresa! Thanks for trying it and letting me know 🙂

      yes those two are the same.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  3. Joanna A. on July 20, 2019 at 3:01 am

    Hi Gemma! Hi Olivia! Thanks for the delicious recipe!!! I made it yesterday and it came out great! I was wondering if i could pour the batter in a waffle maker instead of the frying pan. Do you think it would come out good? (Pity I didn’t think of it earlier, before using up all of the batter. I could have tried it myself!)
    Thank you in advance!

    • Gemma Stafford on July 21, 2019 at 8:14 pm

      Hi Joanna,

      hum, yes you could try the waffle iron but you will end up with a crisp bread. If that is ok with you then go for it!

      Best,
      Gemma.

      • Joanna A. on July 22, 2019 at 3:16 am

        Oh yes, crispy would be great! Thank you Gemma!! ❤❤
        And please please, would you make a keto friendly version of it? Thanks again!!!

  4. Sandy on July 13, 2019 at 4:00 pm

    This looks like a great recipe. I have been looking for a good gluten free flatbread recipe for a family member who is gluten free. We are not dairy free. I don’t like coconut flavoured things so the coconut milk is out for us and I don’t really want to go out and especially buy almond or soy milk. Would regular cows milk work in this recipe do you think? Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 14, 2019 at 3:15 am

      Hi Sandy,
      yes, it will be perfect for this recipe. Just add it carefully, do not over wet the dough and all will be well,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Sandy on July 14, 2019 at 12:31 pm

        Great! Thanks very much, Gemma!

  5. Monique Van de Ven on July 7, 2019 at 2:07 pm

    How long should the batter rest?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 8, 2019 at 10:30 am

      Hi Monique! A few minutes. 3-5 minutes should do it. Gemma 😊

  6. Tonoa Herrebrugh on July 7, 2019 at 4:22 am

    I didn’t read all the messages before posting this, there were a lot!
    I am on keto and looking for new recipes all the time. Tapioca starch/flour does not fit into a keto diet.
    Do you have another idea for making these without the tapioca? I haven’t looked into other things like arrowroot yet.

    • Gemma Stafford on July 8, 2019 at 10:06 am

      If you can’t find tapioca starch, you can replace it with arrowroot flour or potato starch. Though I really do recommend tapioca starch to get the same results as Olivia’s. Gemma 😊

  7. Liz Honey on June 20, 2019 at 8:28 pm

    I have just tried this recipe. The taste is very good but i couldn’t get any crispiness. They were very soft just like crepes. The almond meal was made from almonds with skins on (ie not blanched), and the tapioca flour had been in the cupboard for quite a long time. Do you think either of these reasons could be the cause?

    • Gemma Stafford on June 22, 2019 at 9:42 am

      Hi Liz! The flatbread will turn soft and less crispy once cool. But you can certainly bring it back to a hot pan with a little oil to get that crispiness right before eating. Gemma

  8. Fran Wolff on June 16, 2019 at 11:23 am

    where can I find tapioca starch and is this keto friendly?

    • Gemma Stafford on June 17, 2019 at 9:33 am

      Fran, if you live in the US, you can find tapioca starch in the supermarkets or online on Amazon. Or if you have an Asian supermarket near you, they also sell it there. tapioca is still a starch and will have carbs. You may want to take a deeper look into this.

      Gemma

  9. Joan on June 5, 2019 at 2:34 pm

    I simply love this recipe but I modified the cooking method in order to make these more like lavosh style crackers. I used a dry nonstick pan and once I poured the 1/3 cup batter in to the pan I swirled it around (like you would for crepes) to make it nice and thin. I cooked each side for about 4 min on med heat. I then put them in a 250 degree oven to “dry out” – 30 minutes or so. They are nice and crisp and stay for about a week in a sealed bag. Best cracker I have ever had.

    • Gemma Stafford on June 6, 2019 at 10:55 am

      Joan, you are a wizard!
      I never would have thought to do that! Well done you, thank you so much for sharing this with the Bold Baking community.
      Gemma <3

  10. Mai Valdez on June 4, 2019 at 1:39 am

    Thanks again for this recipe! It is really versatile.

    I did this again today but tried it with half water and soya milk. The mixture is too thin so I added besan flour since I ran out of almond flour.

    I think I found the right mixture that suits my preference.

    Oh, I forgot to mention. I had some cooked mung beans so I added it too to the mixture.

    It turned so good..

    • Gemma Stafford on June 4, 2019 at 12:40 pm

      Hi Mai,
      thank you so much for these suggestions, I really appreciate your adding your experience here. I am delighted that you are working this recipe for your own taste, that is what it is all about,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Patricia Burt on May 29, 2019 at 1:09 pm

    Where do you get the tapioca starch

    • Gemma Stafford on May 30, 2019 at 1:24 am

      Hi Patricia,

      It’s now common place in most supermarkets. I get it at my local whole foods. Also look online.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  12. Karen Feraud on May 23, 2019 at 9:25 am

    Hi! I made this recipe but mine didn’t turn out well, it was very gummie, fell apart when I flipped it 😞☹ what did I do wrong?

    • Gemma Stafford on May 30, 2019 at 11:52 pm

      Hi Karen,

      Really sorry for my late reply. I somehow missed your message. I’m really surprised to hear that, sorry. I have no idea why they would fall apart. Did you use a non stick pan?

      The gummie texture you are talking about actually I think are the texture of these flatbreads. It’s not bready but more like a crepe.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  13. Lynne on May 23, 2019 at 7:40 am

    Hello Liv and Gemma

    I just love both of you so much. Your recipes inspire me, not to mention that they also make me gain weight.
    I looked at the Tapioca carb content and being a diabetic, I need to cut on carbs a lot and Tapioca has A LOT
    Which one would you suggest as alternative.
    Thank you both and keep on baking!

    Lynne

    • Gemma Stafford on May 31, 2019 at 12:26 am

      Hi Lynne,

      Sorry for my very late reply. I somehow missed your comment. So you can replace it with rice flour, potato starch or corn starch. I’m not sure if any of these are better in carbs but hopefully.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  14. Christie on May 15, 2019 at 8:53 pm

    Hello,

    Could I make this recipe with the almond flour and tapioca starch, but use Greek yogurt like I would when making Your recipe for regular flatbread? If so would I use the same amount?

    • Gemma Stafford on May 16, 2019 at 1:46 am

      Hi Christie,
      I think you can. Try a sample recipe, use 1/2 and 1/2 almond flour to tapioca starch. So, depending on how you measure, 2 ozs/56g of almond flour, 2ozs/56g of Tapioca starch then add the yogurt a little at a time until you have a ball of dough, do not over wet it. Then rest it for at least 15 minutes, then shape and roll it for frying. This will be your teacher, experience!
      Gemma 🙂

  15. Patricia Weger on April 12, 2019 at 3:54 pm

    What if I don’t have tapioca flour. May I substitute something else?

    • Gemma Stafford on April 12, 2019 at 4:48 pm

      Hi, you can use arrowroot or potato starch.

  16. Joi on April 11, 2019 at 1:57 am

    Hi Gemma, if im going to substitute coconut milk with almond milk, how many cups should i add? Thank you 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on April 11, 2019 at 4:12 am

      Hi Joi,
      You can do this easily. The issue with adding any liquid to a flour is that you need to add it until the dough comes together in a clean ball, then stop. There is no perfect amount as it changes according to the flour used. So, add 3/4 of the amount in any recipe, mix with a strong hand/dinner fork perhaps, and add a little more until it comes together for you, then rest it for a few minutes.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Pat on April 7, 2019 at 7:05 pm

    Can cornstarch be substituted for the tapioca starch?

    • Gemma Stafford on April 8, 2019 at 11:43 am

      I would not suggest that you can use arrowroot starch instead if you like.

  18. Lucille Deeter on April 7, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    Do you have a recipe for gluten bread made in a breads machine. I have an old one. I tried one using Bob Red Mill flour, and it was not cooked all the way in the middle. any suggestions.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 8, 2019 at 11:46 am

      I dont, ill have to work on that!

  19. Barb on April 7, 2019 at 12:11 pm

    Hi! Is there a substitute for coconut milk? My daughter in law in allergic and this would be a great recipe for her.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 8, 2019 at 11:48 am

      Hi, you can use almond milk instead 😀

  20. Jackie H on April 6, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    These are fantastic! I found they cooked up very much like crepes. It seemed like I could spread the batter out fairly thin once it was on the pan so that thick batter is deceiving. Have you tried freezing these?

    • Gemma Stafford on April 7, 2019 at 1:15 am

      Hi Jackie,
      I did not freeze these, but I cannot see any reason not to.
      I am happy you liked this recipe, it is useful indeed. Can even be used as a pizza type base, other bold bakers have told me so.
      Gemma 🙂

  21. Kay on April 1, 2019 at 2:04 pm

    Hi
    Can I use cassava flour in place of the tapioca starch?

    • Gemma Stafford on April 1, 2019 at 4:49 pm

      Hi, yes you can or potato starch!

  22. Sherine on March 31, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    Hello,
    Thanks for this life saving recipe,after spending about an hour making bread , this defiantly took some pressure off the shoulders. I’m just wondering . Do you have to eat them all right away ?and how long can I leave them out for?

    Thank you,
    Sherine

    • Gemma Stafford on April 1, 2019 at 9:59 am

      I’m delighted to hear that! You can store them in the fridge for up to 3 days.

  23. Erum Adnan on March 25, 2019 at 2:42 pm

    Hi
    I have recently started following your videos and i am totally in love with your easy baking recipes. I was wondering can tapioca flour be replaced with xantham gum or psyllium husk to keep the flat bread really low carb ?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 25, 2019 at 5:11 pm

      Hi, i would not suggest that as it will be very tough and thick. Im delighted you like the recipe 😀

  24. Tina on March 24, 2019 at 7:13 pm

    OK I made the bread and I love it! OK i thought the batter was too thin because i used 40% unsweetened almond milk, and since the can of coconut milk is 13.6 oz i used that much milk then i let it sit to hopefully thicken up, which it didn’t much so i added more of both the flour and starch. The first one was underdone, the second and third folded over on itself when i tried to flip it, the next one came out a bit underdone, the next one was burned, you can smell it, not too burned but the odor is definite, i’m eating it with peanut butter its yummy. So, the almond milk works well and I thank all of you so much for putting your input in!!! yayyyyy i can eat bread again!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 25, 2019 at 11:30 am

      Hi, i’m glad you liked it! I’ll have to try it with almond milk!

  25. Tina on March 23, 2019 at 11:46 am

    Like Roger I’m Diabetic and I love my sweets, and bread/ tortilla’s, so I am excited to try your flat bread, I have read all the comments and instead of the coconut milk I am going to use my light almond milk, I will let you know if it fails or succeeds :D. (forgot to buy the coconut milk) lol

    • Gemma Stafford on March 25, 2019 at 12:06 pm

      Please do let us know how you go! Enjoy!

  26. Joan on March 12, 2019 at 7:32 pm

    just to let you know that if you have tapioca on hand you can grind it up in a food processor to make your tapioca flour.

    • Gemma Stafford on March 13, 2019 at 4:17 pm

      Thanks Joan. Good to know.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  27. Sarah on March 11, 2019 at 9:03 pm

    Hi just made these and they were really good! We put pork chili verde on them. My husband thought they were a little sweet so I will try your suggestion of water or maybe unsweetened almond milk next time. Thank you again 😁

    • Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2019 at 2:12 am

      Sarah, you had me at pork chili verde! Wow, that sounds gorgeous.
      Yes, now that this is your recipe you can make it to your own taste, delighted you tried it,
      Gemma 🙂

  28. Jennifer Irwin on March 11, 2019 at 10:23 am

    Would this recipe work with just gluten free flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 4:04 pm

      I’ve not tried that, but i think so. Let me know how you go!

  29. becky on March 11, 2019 at 8:35 am

    this looks delicious!Can these be froze immediately after making?thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 9:17 am

      Hi, thank you, yes you can freeze them.

      • becky on March 12, 2019 at 9:04 pm

        that’s great to hear!thank you so much!!love your videos 🙂

  30. Joan Bubacz on March 11, 2019 at 8:02 am

    I have finely ground almond flour. Will that work ?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 9:18 am

      Hi, yes that’s perfect!

  31. Teresa on March 10, 2019 at 5:04 pm

    Do you have any idea what the fiber content is?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 4:28 pm

      It should be posted, let me look into that for you!

  32. Belicia on March 10, 2019 at 4:38 pm

    Hi, this recipe looks so easy and healthy I cannot wait to try it!! Just wondering if I would be able to substitute tapioca starch with corn starch?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 4:28 pm

      Hi for this i would not, you can use arrowroot starch instead though.

  33. Mai Valdez on March 4, 2019 at 8:53 pm

    Thanks for this recipe. I exactly used the same ingredients in my first version. It was yummy but the coconut flavor was very strong.

    I made the next batch and used soya milk. I added some nuts and dried fruits. It was a big batch, so I froze the rest in the fridge by adding baking paper in between the bread.

    I also do advance prep. So I mix the dry ingredients (almond and tapioca flour ) and keep it in glass containers. Whenever I need to make some bread, all I have to is add the liquid.

    This is now my newest fave bread. So easy to make.

    Thanks for this.

    • Gemma Stafford on March 7, 2019 at 1:32 am

      Hi there,
      that is a great tip Mai! I do that too, get all of the dry ingredients ready, so easy then to just get it going. I am delighted to have you baking with us, it sounds like you are already a very bold baker,
      Gemma 🙂

  34. maryska on February 10, 2019 at 12:35 am

    Besan or chickpea flour with the tapioca works well too.

    • Gemma Stafford on February 10, 2019 at 2:02 am

      Mary, thank you, I am delighted to get this input, well done you, bold baker indeed!
      Gemma 🙂

  35. Ralph T Stewart on January 25, 2019 at 7:43 pm

    Nancy
    Sorry for the confusion. I meant to say that tapioca flour and tapioca starch are the exact same product. I agree, white refined flour is out!

  36. Kimberly on January 25, 2019 at 2:40 pm

    This was so easy and so good!

  37. Cassandra Carter on January 24, 2019 at 6:06 pm

    Hi,
    I loveee all your recipes!!!
    Just wondering if you can freeze these?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 24, 2019 at 9:26 pm

      I am delighted to hear that! Yes these will freezer well, enjoy!

  38. Fatima Soler Aguilar on January 24, 2019 at 7:16 am

    Is there a substitute for coconut milk?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 24, 2019 at 9:34 pm

      Hi, you can use another non- dairy milk 😀

  39. Ralph T Stewart on January 23, 2019 at 2:31 pm

    Just made the flat bread. Several personal observations. Tapioca starch and flour are identical products. I would use lite coconut milk so the end result would be less oily. I would definitely bake them longer on both sides. I will surely make these again. Thanks for the easy recipe! Pair these with anything that goes well with coconut.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:41 pm

      I like the idea of lite coconut milk too, thank you!

    • Nancy Klassen on January 25, 2019 at 5:55 am

      Hi Ralph!
      For diabetics the almond flour and tapioca flour is a better choice. White flour is a no-no for me! It raises the blood sugar too much!

      Nancy

      • Gemma Stafford on January 25, 2019 at 5:32 pm

        Hope you give this recipe a go! Happy to know that this recipe works better for diabetics like you

      • Ralph T Stewart on January 25, 2019 at 7:40 pm

        Nancy
        Sorry for the confusion. I meant to say that tapioca flour and tapioca starch are the exact same product. I agree, white refined flour is out!

  40. Wanda on January 23, 2019 at 12:41 pm

    Please add me to your email list. Interested in Vegan, sugar free , dairy, gluten free and Vegetarian recipes.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 24, 2019 at 3:02 am

      Hi Wanda,
      I think you are automatically added now, thank you.
      Olivia here with me is our resident alternative baker, passionate about gluten free and low carb recipes. She wil lbe adding to these regularly in the coming months. There is a selection here for you (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/category/recipes/dietary-preferences/). I hope you enjoy some of these.
      Thank you for being here with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  41. Shaheen on January 23, 2019 at 11:43 am

    Can i use coconut flours insists of almond flouer

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:43 pm

      You can try but the texture might be a bit off, let me know how you go!

  42. Steve on January 23, 2019 at 10:12 am

    Can you use any other flour? My son is allergic to nuts.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:44 pm

      Hi you can use coconut flour but cut it in 1/2, it will be a softer texture but will still be nice. Enjoy!

  43. Kathy on January 23, 2019 at 8:29 am

    Any suggestions on which milk to substitute with if you are allergic to coconut? (No dairy )

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:56 pm

      Hi you can use any non-dairy milk 😀

  44. Jill on January 23, 2019 at 7:30 am

    What can I substitute for almond flour, I have tree nut allergies ?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:57 pm

      Hi, you can use coconut flour just cut it in half ;D

  45. Vera on January 23, 2019 at 6:37 am

    Hi! I’m making this at the moment. My daughter has Celiac’s and I’d love to make an alternative to flour tortillas. I’m using Native Forest Organic Coconut Milk, Hodgson Mill Unblanched Almond flour, and “Let’s Do…Organic” Tapioca Flour. I mixed everything according to instructions and it’s very very thick! I am letting it sit but I’m nervous about cooking it. Can you share the brands you used or would suggest?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:58 pm

      Hi there, do not worry the batter is not very sensitive. I used bobs redmill flours.

  46. Victoria Smith on January 23, 2019 at 6:01 am

    Hello,
    So, I’m allergic to almonds. Have you every tried this with rice flour, or any other gluten free flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:58 pm

      This will work with coconut flour if you cut it in half.

  47. Jasmine Sidhwa on January 23, 2019 at 3:39 am

    Hello Gemma… I am from India and have been following your website for baking tips and recipes. I love to bake and appreciate your “baking basics” approach. Am definitely going to try your recipe of ‘No Knead Donuts’. I have also subscribed to your YouTube

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:59 pm

      I’m delighted to hear that! Let me know what you think!

  48. Francine Perretta on January 22, 2019 at 11:31 pm

    Can’t wait to try this recipe! I have eaten Brazilian Pao do quejo which uses cassava flour and cheese, so the almond and tapocia ( cassava flour) is going to be great, for a whole lot less money and much better and cleaner than premodern gluten free products. Thanks for the recipe.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:51 pm

      YAY i am delighted to hear that, let me know what you think!

  49. Pri on January 22, 2019 at 8:21 pm

    Do we need to use coconut milk necessarily? I have pcos and I need to avaoid dairy so I am not sure if I can use milk in any form and kind. Can we not just use water instead ?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2019 at 8:47 pm

      Hi you can use water too but you might want to add a little melted butter or coconut oil to the batter.

      • Ralph T Stewart on January 24, 2019 at 4:42 am

        Thanks for the tip. I’ll try it!

    • Kella on March 10, 2019 at 12:07 pm

      Dear, coconut milk isn’t from cows. It’s the milk of a coconut and a blend of the flesh of the coconut which creates a thick “cream”. There’s no animal milk in it. It’s perfect for anyone with PCOS.

      • Gemma Stafford on March 12, 2019 at 5:24 am

        Kella, I think I lost the thread of this, not sure if this is what was worrying Pri, but thank you for your input,
        Gemma 😉

  50. Barb on January 22, 2019 at 6:28 pm

    I’m really getting into gluten free recipes and would like to try this flat bread recipe but you never gave the amounts… only the ingredients! Help!!

    • Gemma Stafford on January 24, 2019 at 1:14 am

      Hi Barb,
      The recipe is always under the introduction. We are working at making a change to allow you to jump straight to the recipe, but it is there.
      Ingredients

      1 cup (4oz/115g) almond flour*
      1 cup (4oz/115g) tapioca starch*
      1 can (387g/13.6oz) coconut full fat milk*
      1 teaspoon coconut oil, or ghee for frying
      Optional add-ins:
      1/4 teaspoon salt
      1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
      2 tablespoons (1oz/28g) butter, or ghee
      fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped
      I hope this is of help, happy baking,
      Gemma 🙂

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