Your #1 Online Baking Destination!


Donuts, Homemade Donuts, No-Knead Donuts, Gemma Stafford, Bigger Bolder Baking, Homemade Dunkin' Donuts, Homemade Krispy Kreme Donuts, Recipes

No-Knead Donuts (Baked Not Fried)

Save Recipe

Hi Bold Bakers!

On Bigger Bolder Baking, I like to take what I have learned as a professional pastry chef over the years to create recipes for you that yield amazing results using creative methods. My recipe for No-Knead Donuts is exactly that, a simple method with great results.

No-Knead Donuts are simply donuts that don’t reqiure a mixer, you just mix it by hand in minutes. And to really add a cherry on top of this recipe, you also don’t need a deep fryer because these little beauties are baked not fried!!!! Can you believe it? They don’t look like those cakey baked Donuts, right? That’s because it is a real yeast dough I use and I think you will agree these guys are way less fuss and better for you than the traditional fried Donuts.

I made Baked Donuts last year and they were a HUGE hit, but you still wanted to see my No-Knead method so here it is at last.

I am a huge bread nerd. I love working with yeast because you can see your creations come to life in front of your eyes. All the science and care that goes into working with yeast is what makes a happy dough. Yeast doughs are very simple, they want what any living thing wants: love, water, warmth……. and a little bitta sugah! 🙂

I have made many No-Knead recipes before, like my Cinnamon RollsBrioche, and my delicious Soft Pretzels so I hope you enjoy all of these recipes using my favorite dough making technique.

You can create any flavor or shape donuts you like and they will look like they were made professionally in a donut shop. Homemade, No-knead, Baked, Not fried, Donuts, Sprinkle, Glazed, Chocolate, Gemma Stafford, Bigger Bolder Baking, Baking, Baking Videos, Recipes, Hope to make donuts

Traditional Sprinkle Donuts

I LOVE the look of this donut, it reminds me of one you would see in a traditional donut shop.

Homemade, No-knead, Baked, Not fried, Donuts, Sprinkle, Glazed, Chocolate, Gemma Stafford, Bigger Bolder Baking, Baking, Baking Videos, Recipes, Hope to make donuts

Glazed Donuts

So I am definitely a Krispy Kreme gal over other donut shops and this glaze reminds me of their glaze. Dip these little guys straight from the oven and the glaze will form a crisp shell on the hot donut. Double dip if you like a lot of glaze.

Homemade, No-knead, Baked, Not fried, Donuts, Sprinkle, Glazed, Chocolate, Gemma Stafford, Bigger Bolder Baking, Baking, Baking Videos, Recipes, Hope to make donuts

Chocolate Glazed Donuts

If you want your donuts to really stand out dip them in different flavored glazes, making them all unique in look and flavor. No one will say no to a homemade Chocolate Donut.

Homemade, No-knead, Baked, Not fried, Donuts, Sprinkle, Glazed, Chocolate, Gemma Stafford, Bigger Bolder Baking, Baking, Baking Videos, Recipes, Hope to make donuts

4.8 from 67 reviews
No-Knead Donuts (Baked not Fried)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 14
Ingredients
  • 3 ¾ cups (575g/ 1lb 4oz) all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp dried yeast (active or fast action)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¾ cup (200ml) milk, warmed
  • ¾ cup (6oz /170g) butter, melted
  • 4 eggs, at room temperature
  • ¼ cup ( 80g/ 3oz) honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl add in your flour, yeast and salt and mix well together.
  2. In a separate jug, whisk together the milk, eggs, honey, melted butter and vanilla extract
  3. Mix the wet into the dry with a spatula until you form a wet loose dough. Cover tightly with cling film and lay a towel over the top. That’s it, your dough is mixed and no machine needed!! You may have some lumps in the dough but don’t worry, they will disappear in the finished product.
  4. Leave the rise at room temperature for 2-3 hours. You will see it rise and bubble up.
  5. Once doubled in size place the dough in the fridge overnight, roughly for 12 hours. The dough will be loose but will firm up when chilled. Don’t try to work after the 3 hours, it needs to be chilled
  6. overnight. The dough can be kept for 3 days in the fridge.
  7. To form your Donuts: On a floured surface, roll out your dough to ¼ of an inch thick. Using a scone cutter cut out your round pieces of dough. To cut the hole in the middle I used a piping nozzle.
  8. Lay your donuts and donut holes on a baking tray lined with parchment paper (use a good thick baking tray, or double tray so your donuts don’t brown too much on the bottom)
  9. Cover your donuts with a towel and leave to rise again at room temperature for 20-30 minutes. You will know when they are ready because they will have puffed up.
  10. Gently brush the donuts with melted butter
  11. Bake at 375oF (190oC) for 15 minutes. Keep a close eye on them so they don’t get too brown.
  12. Once out of the oven dip your donuts in the glazes. I like to this this straight away because it soaks into the warm donut and creates a lovely crisp glaze.

Vanilla Donut Glaze Recipe
4.8 from 67 reviews
Vanilla Donut Glaze
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ cup (187g/ 6oz) powdered sugar
  • 2-3 3 tablespoons milk
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients.
  2. Whisk until silky and smooth.
  3. If you want it thinner add a little more milk
  4. Store the icing at room temperature in an airtight container for 2 weeks.

Pink Vanilla Donut Glaze Recipe
4.8 from 67 reviews
Pink Vanilla Donut Glaze
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 1 ½ cup (187g/ 6oz) powdered sugar
  • 2-3 3 tablespoons milk
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 small drop Pink food coloring
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients.
  2. Whisk until silky and smooth.
  3. If you want it thinner add a little more milk
  4. Store the icing at room temperature in an airtight container for 2 weeks.

Chocolate Donut Glaze Recipe
4.8 from 67 reviews
Chocolate Donut Glaze
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 1½ cups (187g/ 6oz) powdered sugar
  • 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoons pure vanilla extract.
Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together powdered sugar and cocoa powder. Slowly stir in milk and vanilla extract. Whisk until silky and smooth. If you need a touch more milk to make this a dippable glaze, add a bit more.
  2. Dip doughnuts in chocolate glaze and let rest to harden slightly.

 

SUBMIT YOUR OWN PHOTOS OF THIS RECIPE

74 Images
Submit Your Photos
Suntron3000
Camille
noelyas
lemon_Rio
Mark Sanderson
Alexandria Dickinson
AngelikaDei
MeridieLegna
Maliha Arsalan
dorischua
Tinawlsn
GargiSridharan
Bernice
dorischua
Kristine Mercado
Ameena_zahra
Dewtikum
Michelle B. Mariano
Katrina6229
erdnie
erdnie
Muslimabonu Juraeva
Fruityemz
mcgaryfamilybakers
Katerina024
Christian A. Stray
AnushkaSrivastava
suja
Nishauthup
Sobiya
Nana Osei-Tutu
Jizzliana Yusma
MeghanO
JyotikaSah
Mary Aris
VimiGandhi
VimiGandhi
lettybetty
Shuba626
Samanthi
carrol12
carrol12
Lynn Punzal Rubiano
SharminRH
Mrinal Pawar
TheStarBaker
Rameen.s
linas
Priyanka Jegathesan
Binu
Noralape
BCharles
Missivy Tan-Lim
Sonali Trivedi
Meryhan Raafat
erdnie
Nicole Ghandour
Nila Rahmawati
Irishmammy
xxibgdrgn
CelinesBasics
Megan Gonzales
Navrajsingh
Dainty
Zuzana Fraňová
Zuzana Fraňová
ZainabIqbal
Wolandus
Danu
Ufuoma
Georgianna Edwards
ela8e8
ShaliniKishore
Essaj Lou O. Oiranar
mug_logo_150
Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

Have you made a recipe? Share photos on my website or across social media with the hashtag #boldbaker.

And don't miss my NEW Bold Baking recipes and tips. Sign up for my weekly email newsletter.

691 Comments

  1. Grace on May 18, 2018 at 4:05 am

    Hi Gemma!

    So I made a mistake while making this recipe and left the dough out in room temperature overnight [because I didn’t wake up two-three hours later to throw it in the fridge :(] and now it smells a bit boozy like beer.

    What should I do with the dough? Has it gone too bad for me to use it?
    ;(

    • Gemma Stafford on May 19, 2018 at 12:17 am

      Hi Grace,

      Don’t worry, thats ok. So you can still use it. It might taste a little boozy, just a little but it is totally fine.

      I suggest continue making your donuts.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  2. Deepshikha on May 17, 2018 at 9:10 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Can we make this using the egg substitute instead of the eggs?

    thanks in advance. 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on May 19, 2018 at 12:32 am

      Hi,

      Im not 100% sure what sub would be used here because it’s a yeasted dough. Maybe someone else can chime in and help?

      Gemma.

  3. Essaj Lou O. Oiranar on May 16, 2018 at 1:55 am

    Thanks Ms. Gemma..!! it’s great and easy to make ;-))

  4. Alisa on May 11, 2018 at 8:07 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Can i put the donuts in the fridge after baking(just to keep it)
    Or is there any other way.

    • Gemma Stafford on May 12, 2018 at 3:17 am

      Hi Alisa,
      All baked goods are best consumed in a day or so, that is the nature of them. The exception is cookies, which store very well.
      Keeping them in the fridge will help, but bring them back to room temperature before eating.
      Freezing is an ideal way to keep bread type dough, it defrosts quickly, and can be refreshed in a hot oven if you wish.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  5. Marites on May 9, 2018 at 2:55 pm

    Hi Gemma,Teacher Tes here I m so excited to share this recipe to my students. I’m going to try your recipe and I hope I’ll be doing it fine. Thanks for an easy recipe no need for any machine, but I’m going to fry them instead of baking it. I’ll be updating you if I did it well and post some photos. I wish you well.

    Teacher Tes

    • Gemma Stafford on May 9, 2018 at 2:58 pm

      Hi there,
      Great! I am always happy to hear of young people baking, well done you. I think they will like this recipe. Do the pizza dough with them too, it is a useful one, good for all sorts of breads. I will look forward to the photos,
      Gemma 😉

  6. Daisy on May 8, 2018 at 7:48 am

    hi Gemma,
    thank you for sharing this recipie…..i have not tried it yet but i have a question
    can i directly put it i the fridge,without leaving it out for 2-3 hrs………will it still work?

    excited about making it

    • Gemma Stafford on May 9, 2018 at 2:30 pm

      Hi Daisy,
      Yes, you certainly may, especially if you are refrigerating it/fermenting it, for a long time/overnight.
      Do try this recipe, I think you will love it, it is easy when you know how!
      Gemma 😉

  7. ela8e8 on May 5, 2018 at 5:53 pm

    Dear Gemma,

    I have made these donuts for the second time and they turned out wonderful!
    I really appreciate your work as your recipes are detailed and precise and your videos are professional and concise!
    I am recommending your website to my friends. 🙂
    Thank you a thousand times.

    Hope you all the best,
    Eli.

    • Gemma Stafford on May 7, 2018 at 4:57 am

      Hi there,
      Thank you so much for spreading the word, and for your kind review of this recipe. You guys make it all worthwhile,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Ju on April 25, 2018 at 8:49 pm

    Hi Gemma,

    Thank you very much for the great recipes. I made your Japanese cheesecake and Tiramisu recipes and they turned out great!!! You make everything look so easy. I can’t wait to try more of your recipes.

    Today I tried making this donut. I cut the recipe in half but I forgot to cut the number of eggs in half. I just realized that after I let the dough rose for a couple hours already. Do you have any suggestions to help correcting my mistakes? Or should I just toss that batch and start over? I would really appreciate any input. Thank you very much!!!

    • Gemma Stafford on April 27, 2018 at 5:37 am

      hi Ju,
      no, do not toss it! Bake it as it is, it will be very rich, but good I think.
      When you adjust a recipe it is a good idea to write it out fully, then adjust each ingredient, this way you will have the recipe for another time, and you will not make mistakes.
      I hope it is worth baking for you, not easy to save it otherwise!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Ju on April 29, 2018 at 12:51 pm

        Thank you very much for your reply. When I tried to work with the dough , it was too wet and I had to trash it. Anyway I tried making it again but it still didn’t come out right. I followed all your steps and I used instant yeast that has been kept in the freezer. I’m not sure if that may be the problem.

        Also when you take the dough from the fridge, do I have to wait before working with it or I can work it right away?

        Thank you very much for your help.

        • Gemma Stafford on April 30, 2018 at 3:50 am

          Hi there,
          There are a few things to take into account.
          1. Add the liquids until the dough comes together.
          2. Check the yeast before you use it. Sponge it.This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
          3. generally for a roll/donut etc. you can shape it from the fridge, then allow it to proof again before baking.
          I hope this is of help to you,
          Gemma 🙂

          • Ju on May 6, 2018 at 8:55 pm

            Gemma,

            Thank you very much for your help. I will try to sponge the yeast next time before using it. I always have a problem when working with yeast. Hopefully it will come out right next time.



  9. Ufuoma on April 25, 2018 at 12:38 am

    Hi Gemma,
    The first time I tried this recipe they came out very good, even posted pics. I tried making 2 batches to make enough for my son’s school snacks. Baked the first batch this morning after 9hrs chilling overnight while the second batch is still in the fridge. I noticed that when rolling the dough was so. wet and kept sticking to the floured surface and rolling pin. I managed to shape, allowed to proof for 30mins before baking. The donuts were so soft they broke and the. bottoms stuck to the parchment paper. I’m thinking the dough was too wet and didn’t chill for 12hrs but that’s strange becos I live in a hot place where temps get up to 35 degrees centigrade. What do you think went wrong and how can I remedy it since I have a second batch chilling in the fridge. Thanks.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 27, 2018 at 6:12 am

      Hi there,
      it sounds like you over wet the dough! Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on where, when, how and type of wheat milled and grown.
      Add the liquids carefully, 3/4 at one go, then the remainder a little at a time. It takes very little extra to be too much!
      baking parchment will not stick, it is silicon lined. I think you are using greaseproof paper, this would need to be buttered/oiled.
      Do try again, it is worth it. I will check out the photo shortly,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. Arwa on April 20, 2018 at 8:16 am

    Hello
    I love this recipe but is it ok to replace the butter with coconut oil ? And is is going to be the same ( 3/4 cup )
    Also , the flour that i have is whole wheat, is it okay ?

    Thank you

    • Gemma Stafford on April 21, 2018 at 3:59 am

      Hi Arwa,
      This will be a totally different thing!
      Whole wheat flour has gluten, but it is not as available as in white flour, because of the way it is milled. Many of the yeast recipes can also be used with whole wheat flour, and there are strong whole wheat flours developed for this purpose. The best trick with this flour is to mix in some white/strong white flour, but failing that add a little more sugar, and yeast. The coconut oil should work well for you, but it will not be as rich as butter.
      I suggest you try a small sample bake, this will be your best teacher, but I never saw a wholewheat donut!
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Anna on April 13, 2018 at 7:48 am

    Gemma, this recipe seriously could not be easier!!! I went ahead and made the dough last night (Thursday) for a girl’s brunch tomorrow (Saturday) and it came together beautifully. It’s resting happily in the fridge now! I can’t wait to share photos of the finished product! Great recipe, as always! <3

    • Gemma Stafford on April 13, 2018 at 6:16 pm

      That’s great Anna. I’m really thrilled you like it.

      Can’t wait to see your photos.
      Gemma.

  12. samantha on April 10, 2018 at 9:11 am

    Recipe turned out great but it made a lot more then my family can eat. Is it possible to freeze the left over donuts for a later date.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 10, 2018 at 11:18 am

      Hi Samantha,
      That is great, well done you.
      yes, perfect recipe to freeze, all will be well,
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Bold baker on April 7, 2018 at 6:58 pm

    Great!

  14. Trish Hughes on April 5, 2018 at 4:07 am

    Hi Gemma,
    Is there a way to make gluten free doughnuts using this recipe??? Also can I substitute cows milk for lactose free milk? Thankyou.

    • Gemma Stafford on April 7, 2018 at 2:36 pm

      Hi Trish,

      You can try this recipe with a gluten free all purpose flour. and yes you can use dairy free milk. However just be super carefully about the liquid. You might need more or less because you are using a different flour so don’t add it in all at once.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  15. Mordjanebi on March 31, 2018 at 2:35 am

    Thank you so much Gemma! I tried this one doing exactly as you said and, omg it was amazing! I’m new to baking and I always end up making a recipe 2 to 3 time for it to kinda taste good…or at least look good lol, but this is my first time trying this one and I felt like a chef or something haha! Thank you again and I wish you a good day/night.🌸

    • Gemma Stafford on April 1, 2018 at 11:12 am

      I’m thrilled to hear that! great job 🙂

      Gemma.

  16. Devi on March 23, 2018 at 7:02 am

    Hi Gemmaa, thank youuu for sharing this no knead & baked donuts recipee 😀
    I really like donuts but not too fond of deep frying
    I have a question, can I make potato donuts (spudnuts) with this recipe? Should I substitute half the flour mixture with the mashed potatoes or is there any proper ratio?
    Thank you so much in advance!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 25, 2018 at 6:04 am

      Hi Devi,
      I have never done this, but my mum adds warm mashed potato to a focaccia dough, an enriched savory dough, and it is delicious!
      The warm mash also adds to the proofing, keeping the dough nice and snug. I would try it, and when I get a momnet I will, it really makes sense!
      Do let me know how this works for you, I think it will be great. Love the name too.
      I would not change anything, but take care when adding the liquids, stop when it is just right, in a clean soft ball.
      Add the potato to the dry ingredients, but do not mix until the liquids are going in, I think that will work,
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Mary VanMeter on March 21, 2018 at 6:40 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    My question is this, is there a way to make a real yummy icing with semi sweet bar chocolate instead of dry cocoa powder? I could watch your videos all day. You Gemma are an amazing artist!!!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 22, 2018 at 3:57 am

      Mary, you are way too kind, but I thank you!
      Sure there is a way to make icing with chocolate. You can do this in a number of ways really.
      This is a ganache recipe, using milk and butter. Reducing the milk element of this will thicken the mix, and allow it to set nicely, the butter gives it a shine.
      1 oz unsalted butter
      1/4 cup (2oz) full fat milk
      4 oz of dark 70%ish, cocoa solids chocolate. Proceed as per my Ganache recipe.
      Adding icing sugar will sweeten this and set it up too.
      You can temper chocolate too, to get a nice crisp finish, lovely for pouring over a butter cream, for cream puffs, eclairs etc.
      Lots of ideas really, and a lovely chocolate to work with.
      Gemma 🙂

  18. Darren on March 20, 2018 at 7:46 pm

    Can I half this recipe?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 21, 2018 at 3:28 am

      Hi Darren,
      Yes, just do not reduce the yeast too far. This recipe calls for 2 teaspoons as it it an enriched dough, you can cut it to 1 teaspoon, that will work well for you. TIP: When you reduce a recipe write it out first, then cut each ingredient in 1/2, to avoid confusion. Then you will have this for another time.
      If you are not using fast acting yeast, sponge it in the liquids before proceeding. This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      I hope all this works well for you,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Darren on March 21, 2018 at 7:12 pm

        Thanks a lot! Have a nice day 🙂

  19. Maha on March 13, 2018 at 2:59 pm

    Some questions:

    1. For chocolate glaze can I just melt chocolate chips and use them as glaze.

    2. Can I use instant yeast because I don’t have dried yeast?

    • Gemma Stafford on March 17, 2018 at 12:36 pm

      Hi Maha,

      Yes you can use instant yeast. You can do that with chocolate but just note it will not be a soft and sticky glaze, but it will set hard like chocolate.

      Gemma.

  20. Zuzana Fraňová on March 7, 2018 at 6:44 am

    Hi, the recipe is brilliant! I’m no baker and I usually just do simple cakes and muffins. But this is TOP!
    Also, I made around twice that much serves! 😀

    • Gemma Stafford on March 9, 2018 at 7:02 am

      Hi there,
      Thank you, I am happy to hear this,
      Gemma 🙂

  21. shiri on February 27, 2018 at 2:37 am

    Hi Gemma! I find your video clips very interesting.. It also motivated me to go back on breadmaking. I then tried the No-knead donut recipe for 2 times and the no-knead cinnamon roll. I followed your recipe, practiced high standards in food handling and sanitation but still, it ended me up with sour donuts and cinnamons. They looked perfect with the glaze and all those toppings but the taste seems very different.. My first and second tries tasted sourly and yeastly. What have I missed? Is this normal?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 27, 2018 at 3:22 am

      Hi there,
      Tell me about the yeast you used! There are two basic types, but within the dry yeast category a couple of types.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Dried yeast can be sponged, and all dried yeast can be sponged before adding it to the flour.
      This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      I think this may be your issue, your yeast is not instant type, and needs to be sponged before use. Try it,
      Gemma 😉

  22. Angela on February 18, 2018 at 10:26 pm

    Hello Gemma,

    How would you make a maple glaze?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 19, 2018 at 2:49 am

      Hi Angela,
      This is really a bit like a fudge frosting.
      I have not made this, but there are a number of recipes online, some are cooked down like a caramel, with milk, maple syrup and confectioners/icing sugar, otheres are just warmed and combined.
      It depends on your purpose for this really, I like a recipe from Taste of Home!
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Angela on February 21, 2018 at 9:38 pm

        Hello! I had another question. It states that the eggs should be at room temperature. How long do I need to have the eggs out before use? Thanks!

        Angela

        • Gemma Stafford on February 22, 2018 at 2:08 am

          Hi Angela,
          If you take the eggs from the fridge, and allow them to stand in a little warm, not hot, water for five minutes they will be ready!
          I tend to leave mine at room temperature, because I use them so frequently, an hour or so will do really.
          Happy baking, thank you for being in touch,
          Gemma 🙂

  23. Mohsina on February 6, 2018 at 10:20 am

    Hi Gemma !
    The first time i tried this recipe. It turned out amazing. But this time when i tried, the dough isn’t rising and also the bubbly strands are not appearing as last time, though i have exactly followed the recipe.
    Please help!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 7, 2018 at 5:35 am

      Hi there,
      Tell me more!
      About your yeast for instance!
      This is a common question, and I have developed this little explanation, I hope it is of help in this case. Read it through, and let me know.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough.
      If it seems over-wet, add more flour.
      Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar. Or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      Using a mixer: If you are using a mixer with a dough hook, you should have a ‘foot’ form, attaching the dough to the bottom of the bowl, this will ensure a good texture to the dough. If it seems over-wet, add more flour. Flour in different places behaves in different ways, depending on how, where, when and the type of wheat grain being milled. It takes very little extra liquid to make a dough too wet to handle. Learn how to add it so that it is just right.
      Gemma 🙂

  24. Gina Padilla on February 5, 2018 at 5:20 am

    Hi Gemma, what if you don’t have parchment paper? Money is very tight and I made the dough thinking I had some but now I don’t want to ruin them by baking directly on the cookie sheet

    • Gemma Stafford on February 5, 2018 at 9:13 pm

      Hi Gina,

      you can bake directly onto your baking tray. Just make sure you grease it with a little butter before. The reason we use parchment is so we don’t have to wash our trays.You can bake just fine directly on the tray.

    • Debbie C on March 30, 2018 at 7:07 pm

      For the person who commented on parchment paper and funds being tight, Dollar tree carries parchment paper! My funds are tight too. I am grateful for finds like that. 🙂

      • Gemma Stafford on March 31, 2018 at 6:33 pm

        I’m a huge dollar tree fan 🙂

  25. Mahreen Mufti on February 2, 2018 at 4:58 am

    Hi Gemma!Can we substitute the honey in the recipe with sugar?In that case,what would be the correct amount?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 3, 2018 at 12:20 pm

      Yes you can. Check my sugar chart and see that amount you need to substitute.

      Best,
      Gemma

  26. Noel on February 1, 2018 at 8:58 pm

    Hi Gemma! I did this recipe about 3 times now and they are just perfect! Just forgot to put the vanilla glaze while donuts are hot fresh out from the oven, I will this part soon haha! Recently, I got pressed for time so I tried baking them after 8 hours once the 2-3 hour spot proofing and they turned out well as they baked but the texture is quite challenging to roll out with a rolling pin since the gluten strands were not strongly developed I assume? With this in mind, how much time exactly does ‘overnight’ mean? At least 12 hours? or so? Finally, can you use crazy dough recipe instead if you lack eggs and honey so you just use the sugar and yogurt combo instead? My suppliers failed to send me our weekly supply of honey and eggs so this is why I am asking. I love you creations and am doing everything that we can to share with our friends. Thanks so much for making things realistic, doable and creative for dessert lovers like us. Praying for you and your endeavors! More power! <3

    • Gemma Stafford on February 2, 2018 at 3:06 am

      Hi Noel,
      Well thank you, you made me smile.
      How well though out this is, and this is really how you learn to develop recipes, adjust them etc.
      I would say 8 hours is sufficient after the first proofing, but I live in California, where room temperature is high all year round.
      My mum who lives in Ireland, where room temperature hardly ever rises over 18C, would say 12 hours, and the enriched dough, for cinnamon rolls, which she loves, really does need that extra time. If you roll it straight from the fridge after the fermentation it may be a little easier to roll too, and this will speed up the next stage of the proofing. Lift the dough too, and allow it to pull away from your hand, stretching it, then allow it to sit for a few mins, and it will relax!
      Yes, for the crazy dough, it will be less rich, as this is what the eggs do, but if you have ground linseed/flax seed you could use a flax egg! See the substitute chart here on the website. I had an interesting comment from another Bold Baker last week, she uses whey powder as an egg sub. I have not tried it, but I will, it makes sense!
      Thank you for sharing, that really helps to build our community, and all comments and contributions are published here to help others.
      I hope this is of help to you Noel, do let us know,
      Gemma 🙂

  27. Nida on January 29, 2018 at 11:59 am

    Instant yeast is also called Active dry yeast or its something diffrent? Kindly differentiate please.thankyou

    • Gemma Stafford on January 29, 2018 at 1:02 pm

      Hi Nida,
      This is my little FYI, all about yeast.
      Fresh or Compressed Yeast: They should only be bought in amounts that will be used quickly. Fresh Yeast comes in small square cakes and is perishable. If not used right away, it can be stored in the refrigerator up to 3 days. It can also be frozen. One cake of Fresh Yeast equals one envelope of dry yeast.
      Dry Yeast: It is the most convenient of the two types. It is granulated and comes in little 1/4-ounce packets, 9 g. (approximately 2-1/4 teaspoons) or loose in a jar. Once exposed to the air, it should be stored in the refrigerator.
      Types of Dry Yeast: There are two types of Dry Yeast, regular, active and the other is Instant,rapid or fast acting. Instant/fast acting yeast can be added directly to the flour, but it can also be sponged before using.
      Baking with Yeast: Yeast is basically used in bread making. Breads are many and varied, and dough can be as plain as a simple white flour with few additions, or enriches as in Brioche, croissants, soft rolls etc. Brown flour/spelt flour will work well with yeast, especially if they have been formulated to do so. The Gluten in these flours is less available than in white flour, so they often have vital wheat added for best results. Adding extra sugar also helps with these flours.
      Gluten Free flour will not work, unless it is formulated to do so.
      Sponging: This means activating the yeast, usually in the liquids to be used in the recipe. Normally you would bring the sponging liquids to blood temperature, that is when you put your finger into the liquid it should feel neither hot nor cold. A touch of sugar, or honey will speed up the activation. This is really ‘proving’ to you that the yeast is good and active. A foam will form on top of the liquids after 5 mins or so, you stir this through before adding to the flour. Add ¾ in one go, then the remainder until the dough comes together in a clean ball.
      I hope this is of help, there is no problem as long as you know what to do with the available yeast, sponge it if in doubt!
      Gemma 🙂

  28. Sarah on January 28, 2018 at 8:12 pm

    Thank you for the great recipe. It’s my first time for baked donuts and it turned out great. Just a few questions. For the strawberry glazed, is it possible to add a scent of strawberry? I can only smell the icing. Thank you.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 29, 2018 at 1:56 pm

      Hi Sarah,
      I am not sure what you mean by this!
      Strawberry is not a strong flavor, not like lemon for instance, where the flavor is concentrated in the oil in the zest/skin.
      You will hardly ever find this used as a flavor, except in artificial ways, in candies for instance. So, the best way to do this is to use it as a coulis, or a sauce, or reduce it by boiling it and adding it when cold to a buttercream frosting, or a water icing.
      I may have misunderstood this, but I think this is what you need to know,
      Gemma 🙂

  29. Adrian on January 27, 2018 at 1:33 pm

    Great receipe can’t wait to try If using a yeast replacement such as Baking Soda/Lemon juice mix do you prove the same way as i understand this not needed like yeast also do you use warm ingredients to?. Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on January 28, 2018 at 3:44 pm

      Hi Adrian,

      I have never used a yeast replacement and I actually have never heard of that substitute. I’m not sure if I would recommend that.

      Gemma.

  30. Irishmammy on January 27, 2018 at 8:57 am

    Sweet mother of Devine…… I made two separate batches. Followed the instructions to a T. I baked the first lot and iced them. I didn’t have honey so used caster sugar instead. They were soooo nice. Fried the 2nd lot and they were even nicer. Both turned out perfectly. Made enough for the whole county lol Right I’m off to the gym now hun to burn off 5000calories 😂 Thanks Gemma 😉 🇮🇪

    • Gemma Stafford on January 27, 2018 at 5:21 pm

      Lol I’m delighted to hear they were a success!!! I’m going to try a recipe with fried ones soon so keep an eye out for that.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  31. Nila Rahmawati on January 23, 2018 at 2:58 pm

    love it..love it..love it… it’s so easy, i can make the dough in the afternoon and baked it in morning. Love the texture, just like fried donuts, minus the calory hehehe.. definitely will make it again. thanks for the recipe

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2018 at 7:53 pm

      Yay!!! Im delighted you liked it 🙂

  32. Sonali Trivedi on January 22, 2018 at 8:50 am

    Firstly i tried these and they were absolutely perfect thanks for replying to my previous query… Can we make Bomboloni from using same method??I know that Bomboloni are Italian doughnuts but can we make them by this process as well??

    • Gemma Stafford on January 23, 2018 at 11:29 am

      Hi there,
      I have to say these sound delicious! A fried donut, filled with a pastry cream, what is not to love.
      This is made with a brioche type enriched dough, and egg is a big part of it. Yes, you could fry this dough, but for what you are looking for I think it will not be rich enough.
      I think this dough will work really well for you (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/brioche-dough/) but I did not try it fried, I tend to bake rather than fry.
      Let us know if you choose to try it,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Sonali Trivedi on January 23, 2018 at 9:12 pm

        Thanks Gemma for replying yes I’ll try this today and surely update on how it turned out…hopefully upload some pics if possible…thanks you are the best!

        • Gemma Stafford on January 25, 2018 at 8:05 am

          Thank you Sonali, actually our lovely Bold Bakers are the best, really, never an unkind word, and lots of help too.
          Good that you are with us,
          Gemma 🙂

      • Sonali Trivedi on January 25, 2018 at 4:43 am

        Hi Gemma,
        Just a quick update I made those doughnuts using the method mentioned in link and they turned out so
        gooood thanks for easy recipe!! you are the best!! thanks again…

        • Gemma Stafford on January 25, 2018 at 5:43 am

          Great, I am really happy to hear this, thank you for being in touch,
          Gemma 😉

  33. caroljup on January 14, 2018 at 11:29 pm

    I love all your videos, Thank you for sharing all the wonderful recipes!!!, can’t wait to try this recipe out!!!!!!!. Would like to try this out soon!!!!. You are a Great help to all the home bakers, you help use make great cooking memories for our families!!!!. Please have patience with me, I have a few questions.

    1. taste and texture, whole milk or butter milk?
    2. if I use butter milk, use room temperature or heat in microwave?
    3.Active Dry Yeast is only available where I live, will this be ok?
    4. Do I sprinkle the baking sheet with water like you did in your other doughnut video?
    5. taste and texture, will they be better fried or baked, I don’t mind the extra calories?
    6. I would like to make only doughnut holes, how long will I have to bake them?
    7. if I bake them I know you said double the pan, would placing a small amount of water in a oven proof bowl on the lower rack in the oven under the pan result in the doughnuts bottom to be softer?
    8. I would like to roll my doughnut holes in cinnamon sugar, do I wait for them to cool, then dip them in butter and then roll them in the cinnamon sugar coating?

    I have a drafty home any tips or tricks to helping to get the correct rise, should the first and the second rise be double in size or stick to the up to 3 hours for the first rise and 20-30 minutes for the second rise?

    I would really like to make these for a Saturday morning treat for my family, so would these steps be correct, make the dough on Thursday, let it rise in a warm place up to 3 hours, then fridge over night, Friday, roll place on a parchment lined cookie sheet wrap tightly with a greased sheet of saran wrap, Saturday, take out of fridge let rise in a warm place again for 20-30 minutes then bake. Do I take the saran wrap off or leave on or do I take the saran wrap off and cover with a tea towel?

    I know this is a lot, just want the results to be great like the other viewers have posted and want this to be the only recipe that will be lasting memories for my family!!!!

    Again sorry for so many questions

    • Gemma Stafford on January 15, 2018 at 5:35 am

      Hi there,
      Yes, a lot of questions!
      Many of these are answered in the instructions for this recipe. (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/no-knead-donuts/).
      This recipe dos not call for buttermilk. If you are using this do not use a cultured one, but one which remains after the butter making process, fresh.
      for yeast baking warm liquids work to activate the yeast, and in your case, using an Active dried Yeast, it will be best to warm the liquids, add the yeast to the liquids, stir through, and stand for a few minutes, a foam will form on top of the liquids, this is then mixed into the flours, with the melted butter etc.
      You can sprinkle the baking sheet with water if you wish. This adds a little steam to the oven.
      You can fry this dough, that will be a choice, taste and texture will be much the same really, but it wil be easier to get the cinnamon sugar to remain on the oil cooked ones, you could try both!
      If your home is cool, that is if the room temperature does not go much above 18C, then you can make this dough and proof it overnight at room temperature, in a well covered bowl. Then you can roll and shape in the morning, and they will proof quickly at room temperature for you.
      You never cover a dough which has been shaped for baking in such a way as to restrict it rising, unless you are freezing it.
      Tip: When proofing dough in a drafty kitchen use your oven cavity. In a cold place you can turn the oven on for a few minutes, but only at a temperature of about 100C, then switch it off, the oven is a draft free environment, and makes a great proofing box.
      Exclude the air when prooving dough, but do not restrict it!
      I hope this is of help. Really you will find this in the video, and instructions,
      Gemma 🙂

      • carol on January 16, 2018 at 8:51 am

        Thank You And Very Sorry for all the questions, Very excited about making the doughnuts.

        • Gemma Stafford on January 17, 2018 at 3:59 am

          🙂

  34. Ninja on January 12, 2018 at 12:39 am

    I loved these donuts, but my plain donuts with no glaze or toppings were not at all sweet, they kinda tasted like bread – next i will add sugar to the dough, but i wanted to know if its meant to taste like this or did i do something wrong? Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on January 12, 2018 at 6:44 am

      Hi Ninja,
      Plain donuts tend to be a little like bread, they need something to sweeten them. Certainly add a little sugar to the dough next time, or even just a little powdered sugar at the end of baking, that will do it,
      Gemma 🙂

  35. Nadia on January 11, 2018 at 3:24 am

    Hey Gemma, can I substitute baking powder instead of yeast ?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 11, 2018 at 7:46 pm

      Hi Nadia,

      Unfortunately no, you can’t sub baking powder for yeast.

      Gemma.

  36. Megan on January 9, 2018 at 5:54 pm

    How long do these stay fresh for?

    • Gemma Stafford on January 10, 2018 at 6:27 pm

      2 days Megan in an airtight container 🙂

  37. Ihab Husseini on January 6, 2018 at 7:14 pm

    Hi Jemma!

    Is there any specific sort of oven you prefer to use? Convention oven or convection and do you use air forced ovens?

    Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on January 7, 2018 at 3:43 am

      Hi there,
      This is a good question.
      1. Conventional ovens used the natural movement of the hot air within the oven cavity to cook the food. The Temperature can change really quickly if the oven door is opened too often through the cooking, and the position of the food in the oven can affect the heating, cooking of the food. They are often gas ovens, and in this case the food needs to be positioned, and have the position changed through the cooking.
      2. Convection ovens (Fan Assisted) ovens are really a consistent eay to cook, needing less attention once the food goes into the oven. You can select a lower temperature, and opening the door does not affect the temperature in the same way, though it is never advised to keep on opening an oven through baking. It is faster, more consistent, and it is difficult today to but an electric oven which does not have at least the option of fan assist. Many are multi functional, allowing for the combination of fan with grill (broiler) too, which is magic!
      So, I have always cooked in a convection oven, though I sometimes choose the conventional mode, for meringues for instance. Take a look on line there are many great instructions from good manufacturers. I have an LG model here, which I love!
      Gemma 🙂

  38. Nicole Ghandour on January 4, 2018 at 1:26 am

    I loved this one. I followed the instructions and they turned out amazing. Thank you Gemma for all of your lovely recipes. I put a photo but it didn’t appear yet. What do you think is wrong? Do the pictures take time to upload ? Also I’m not getting any notifications when you reply. What should I do to get notified? Love you💖💖

    • Gemma Stafford on January 4, 2018 at 3:33 am

      Hi Nicole,
      No, you should not get a notification when I reply, it is not built in to the system, but it is a good idea, I will mention it to the tech people (Kevin!).
      The photos are approved before they go up, this is because we can get multiple photos of the same thing, we select the clearest one to upload. We are always delighted to see the pics, and they are really encouraging for other Bold Bakers too.
      I will be going over to image aproval as soon as I get the comments answered. Thank you for taking the trouble,
      Gemma 🙂

  39. Askha on December 29, 2017 at 7:57 am

    Which butter ,salted, ,,unsalted?

    • Gemma Stafford on December 30, 2017 at 4:48 am

      Hi there,
      Though it really does not matter, I tend to use salted butter for all of my baking,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Ricer on December 31, 2017 at 1:56 am

        What should I do if I have forgotten to leave the dough out for 2-3hours at room temperature? I directly put the dough in the fridge?

        • Gemma Stafford on December 31, 2017 at 4:50 am

          Hi there,
          Take it out to bring it to room temperature and proof before baking. The dough continues to ferment in the fridge. When it is easy to handle shape it into the donuts, and proof to double in size, all will be well,
          Gemma 🙂

  40. Sonika Madhuri S on December 27, 2017 at 5:54 am

    Hii Gemma…
    I had left the dough to ferment but I don’t c any changes …. it’s look just the way when the ingredients wer combined…
    I hav left it for 4 hrs at room temperature and 24hrs in the refrigerator…
    IS it ok or is ther something wrong wid the dough ??

    • Gemma Stafford on December 28, 2017 at 3:16 am

      Hi there,
      What yeast did you use? Really if all of the ingredients are right this has to react in this time, something wrong!
      I hope it has resolved by now,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Sonika Madhuri S on December 28, 2017 at 6:33 pm

        Hii
        I used active dry yeast …
        I didn’t work on it it’s still in the refrigerator as I don’t eat eggs on some days ..
        now is there any way out or can try making donuts with the same dough ?

        • Gemma Stafford on December 29, 2017 at 3:49 am

          Hi Sonika,
          Take it from the fridge, shape it, cover it and allow to stand at room temperature.
          I do not know what happened here, but the dough may yet activate at the right temperature. If they do not rise they will not be good.
          I think you need to prove that the yeast is in good condition. Take 300ml of warm liquids, blood temperature. Add 1 teaspoon of sugar, and 1 teaspoon of the yeast. Stir it through, and allow to stand at room temperature for 5 mins, if a foam/sponge forms at the top it is good, not dead, and can be used to bake with.
          Go back to the video and take a look, see how we do it, I think something went badly wrong here,
          Gemma 🙂

  41. erdnie on December 11, 2017 at 1:42 pm

    Hi Gemma! First of all thank you for your wonderful recipes and videos. My sisters and I love watching them and they give us more motivation to bake!
    I had a few questions:
    Is it ok to substitute oil instead of butter? (I usually do half than the amount of butter stated)
    How can i make the white glaze in a way that will not sink into the donut but will remain as a thick white topping? ( like your pink glaze)
    Is it normal that the dough shrinks when i start making the shapes? The dough kind of pulled about 2 centimeters away from the cookie cutter.
    thanks in advance!

    • Gemma Stafford on December 12, 2017 at 2:38 am

      Hi there,
      Good to have you with us. Dough will collapse when punched down/cut/handled after the first proof. When you roll it for cutting allow it to stand for a few minutes before cutting, this will relax it, and stop it pulling back. Then you prove again before baking.
      You can make a simple glaze, icing/powdered sugar, a drop of lemon juice, and a very little warm water, very little water, teaspoon at a time until you get to where you want it. You can also use a fudge frosting (https://www.biggerbolderbaking.com/chocolate-fudge-frosting/). You can flavor this too, with coffee for instance! Be brave, experiment,
      Gemma 🙂

      • erdnie on December 12, 2017 at 2:41 am

        Thank you so much, I followed your advice and cutting out the donuts went much more smoothly… I will post the pics when they are done. 🙂

Leave a Comment





Rate this recipe:  

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This