Breads & Doughs

Brazilian Cheese Bread (Pão de Queijo)

4.54 from 13 votes
My Brazilian Cheese Bread recipe, also known as Pão de Queijo, is like taking your average dinner roll and making it better in every way!
Brazilian Cheese Bread, ready to serve.

Hi Bold Bakers!

Who has heard of Pão de Queijo? Imagine a chewy, cheesy, yet soft and moist little roll that’s great on its own or served alongside any meal — that’s what this is! This Brazilian Cheese Bread is traditionally served with dinner or lunch instead of plain bread rolls. While I have lots of love for dinner rolls, these are on another level.

If you like cheese, and you like bread, you will LOVE Pao De Queijo. Best of all?? They are gluten-free!

What is Brazilian Cheese Bread?

Brazilian Cheese Bread is a cross between a choux pastry and a cheesy dinner roll. Made by combining tapioca starch, eggs, and oil, then mixed up with loads of savory cheddar, this bread has stretch and chew from both the cheese and the starch, yet is puffed up as light as air. After the dough is mixed it’s piped with a piping bag like choux pastry making for the perfect little cheese puff.

Pão de queijo piled up in a basket, showing texture.

Do I have to Use Tapioca Starch?

Tapioca starch is what creates the stretchy texture of the cheese bread. This may sound like an unusual ingredient, but it’s super common these days and is actually used in many of Liv’s recipes for gluten-free bread like her 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flat Bread. Tapioca starch is made of a root vegetable called cassava root. It is super important in this recipe and can not be substituted with another kind of starch or flour.

What Kind of Cheese Do I Use?

Well, in my house whenever cheese is required I use Dubliner Irish Cheddar! I’m loyal like that. I love how sharp and rich Irish cheddar is. It’s perfect in this recipe adding lots of salty flavors and bite. You can use any cheddar you like, but you can also use parmesan or pepper jack cheese, making this recipe very versatile in that way.

The inside of Brazilian Cheese Bread

How Do I Store Brazilian Cheese Bread?

Brazilian Cheese Bread is really best when fresh out of the oven. That said, it is great the next day and can be covered and reheated in a low oven or even the microwave. To store the cheese bread, just put it in an airtight container and store at room temperature for up to 2 days. I KNOW they will not last that long though…

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Brazilian Cheese Bread Recipe (Pão de Queijo)

4.54 from 13 votes
My Brazilian Cheese Bread recipe, also known as Pão de Queijo, is like taking your average dinner roll and making it better in every way!
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 24 cheese puffs
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 50 mins
My Brazilian Cheese Bread recipe, also known as Pão de Queijo, is like taking your average dinner roll and making it better in every way!
Author: Gemma Stafford
Servings: 24 cheese puffs

Ingredients

  • 1 1/4 cups (10oz/282g) whole milk
  • 1/2 cup (4floz/115ml) oil, (canola or light olive oil)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups (8oz/225g) tapioca flour
  • 2 beaten eggs, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups (6oz/170g) grated cheddar, grated
  • extra grated cheddar, for topping

Instructions

  • Pre-heat your oven to 450°F (225°C) then butter and line 2 baking trays with parchment paper. 
  • In a medium saucepan bring the milk, oil, and salt just to a boil over medium heat.
  • Once the milk mixture boils, add the tapioca flour while mixing quickly and constantly with a wooden spoon, as if you are making a choux pastry. 
  • When the mix begins to form a dough after 1-2 minutes, remove from the heat and allow to cool just slightly. 
  • Place the dough in the bowl of a stand mixer then add the eggs and the cheese and mix on high speed until the dough is super thick, shiny and stretchy, about 4-5 minutes. 
  • Transfer the dough to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch round tip, then pipe the batter into 1 1/2 inch cheese puffs leaving some room for them to spread. Top each piped cheese puff with additional cheese.
  • Bake for about 20 mins or until the cheese has melted and each cheese bread is lightly golden brown and puffed. 
  • Allow to cool just slightly, then serve and enjoy warm!
  • Cover and store leftover cheese puffs in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days. 

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Comments & Reviews

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Rama
Guest
Rama
2 months ago

Hi

Let be your recipe’s.
Can I replace the eggs?

Almanza Dsouza
Guest
Almanza Dsouza
2 months ago

Can a alternate be used for tapioca flour since we do not get it here in india

Julie Scriver
Guest
Julie Scriver
2 months ago

We had these in a Brazilian BBQ restaurant in Orlando, everyone raved about them so they posted the recipe on their wall by the front door. We couldn’t stop eating them! Will have to try this recipe!

Abel
Guest
Abel
2 months ago

Brazilian cheese bread is made with ‘mandioca’ starch, called ‘Polvilho’, which has two variations: sour or sweet. Its origin is reported in Paraguay and Argentina. His appearance in Brazil began in 1860, by priests of Portugal in the period of colonization. From 1960 the cheese bread spread throughout Brazil. Undoubtedly he is the great champion in the Brazilian snack, being consumed with large mugs of fresh coffee. It is not common to eat during traditional meals, it has a similar consumption with the English cookies (Scones) or American. The cheese used in the cheese bread recipe here in Brazil is… Read more »

Helena
Guest
Helena
3 months ago

Hi Gemma! I was searching for some oat cookie recipe and found your site. First of all: congratulations! Your work is fenomenal.
About Pão de Queijo, if it’s ok, I want to add some tips, first and most important: don’t use cheddar. This treat originally uses a salty cheese called Minas Cheese, you can substitute it using parmesan – the taste will be more similar. And you can create a whole different dish not adding cheese: you will have salty biscuits – you can cook them by the oven or fry them. Hope you like my tips!

Jane
Guest
Jane
3 months ago

Hi Gemma, can i use cooking oil instead of canola/olive oil?

Member
Eisenhub
4 months ago

I have had these in Brazil for breakfast and fell in love ❤️… I can’t wait to try them. Thank you!!

Debora Carvalho
Guest
Debora Carvalho
4 months ago

Hi Gemma!

Actually here in Brazil it’s not common to eat those with dinner or even lunch. It’s usually a snack that pairs very well with coffee. In Brazil we have them for breakfast or as an afternoon snack. Actually, I’ve never seen anyone having them along with big meals such as lunch (since in Brazil it’s our main meal) or dinner (except when people have cold cuts, bread and coffee in the evening).

Katie
Guest
Katie
4 months ago

My cleaning ladies are from Brazil and they are at my house now! I can’t wait show them

Member
Patricia Sheffield
4 months ago

What attachment do you use when dough is transferred to the mixer?

About Us

Meet Gemma

About Us

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I want to help you bake with confidence anytime, anywhere! No matter your skills, I have you covered. Sign up for a FREE profile and join millions of other Bold Bakers in the community for new dessert recipes, baking techniques, and more every week!

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