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Brazilian Cheese Bread, ready to serve.

Brazilian Cheese Bread (Pão de Queijo)

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My Brazilian Cheese Bread recipe, also known as Pão de Queijo, is like taking your average dinner roll and making it better in every way!


Hi Bold Bakers!

Who has heard of Pão de Queijo? Imagine a chewy, cheesy, yet soft and moist little roll that’s great on its own or served alongside any meal — that’s what this is! This Brazilian Cheese Bread is traditionally served with dinner or lunch instead of plain bread rolls. While I have lots of love for dinner rolls, these are on another level.

If you like cheese, and you like bread, you will LOVE Pao De Queijo. Best of all?? They are gluten-free!

What is Brazilian Cheese Bread?

Brazilian Cheese Bread is a cross between a choux pastry and a cheesy dinner roll. Made by combining tapioca starch, eggs, and oil, then mixed up with loads of savory cheddar, this bread has stretch and chew from both the cheese and the starch, yet is puffed up as light as air. After the dough is mixed it’s piped with a piping bag like choux pastry making for the perfect little cheese puff.

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Do I have to Use Tapioca Starch?

Tapioca starch is what creates the stretchy texture of the cheese bread. This may sound like an unusual ingredient, but it’s super common these days and is actually used in many of Liv’s recipes for gluten-free bread like her 3 Ingredient Gluten Free Flat Bread. Tapioca starch is made of a root vegetable called cassava root. It is super important in this recipe and can not be substituted with another kind of starch or flour.

What Kind of Cheese Do I Use?

Well, in my house whenever cheese is required I use Dubliner Irish Cheddar! I’m loyal like that. I love how sharp and rich Irish cheddar is. It’s perfect in this recipe adding lots of salty flavors and bite. You can use any cheddar you like, but you can also use parmesan or pepper jack cheese, making this recipe very versatile in that way.

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How Do I Store Brazilian Cheese Bread?

Brazilian Cheese Bread is really best when fresh out of the oven. That said, it is great the next day and can be covered and reheated in a low oven or even the microwave. To store the cheese bread, just put it in an airtight container and store at room temperature for up to 2 days. I KNOW they will not last that long though…

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4.5 from 8 votes
Brazilian Cheese Bread, ready to serve.
Brazilian Cheese Bread Recipe (Pão de Queijo)
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
50 mins
 

My Brazilian Cheese Bread recipe, also known as Pão de Queijo, is like taking your average dinner roll and making it better in every way!

Course: bread
Cuisine: brazilian
Servings: 24 cheese puffs
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
  • 1 1/4 cups (10oz/282g) whole milk
  • 1/2 cup (4floz/115ml) oil, (canola or light olive oil)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups (8oz/225g) tapioca flour
  • 2 beaten eggs, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 cups (6oz/170g) grated cheddar, grated
  • extra grated cheddar, for topping
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat your oven to 450°F (225°C) then butter and line 2 baking trays with parchment paper. 

  2. In a medium saucepan bring the milk, oil, and salt just to a boil over medium heat.

  3. Once the milk mixture boils, add the tapioca flour while mixing quickly and constantly with a wooden spoon, as if you are making a choux pastry. 

  4. When the mix begins to form a dough after 1-2 minutes, remove from the heat and allow to cool just slightly. 

  5. Place the dough in the bowl of a stand mixer then add the eggs and the cheese and mix on high speed until the dough is super thick, shiny and stretchy, about 4-5 minutes. 

  6. Transfer the dough to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch round tip, then pipe the batter into 1 1/2 inch cheese puffs leaving some room for them to spread. Top each piped cheese puff with additional cheese.

  7. Bake for about 20 mins or until the cheese has melted and each cheese bread is lightly golden brown and puffed. 

  8. Allow to cool just slightly, then serve and enjoy warm!

  9. Cover and store leftover cheese puffs in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days. 

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Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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11 Comments

Write a Comment and Review

  1. Betsy Eisenhut on July 11, 2019 at 5:12 pm

    I have had these in Brazil for breakfast and fell in love ❤️… I can’t wait to try them. Thank you!!

  2. Debora Carvalho on July 11, 2019 at 10:30 am

    Hi Gemma!

    Actually here in Brazil it’s not common to eat those with dinner or even lunch. It’s usually a snack that pairs very well with coffee. In Brazil we have them for breakfast or as an afternoon snack. Actually, I’ve never seen anyone having them along with big meals such as lunch (since in Brazil it’s our main meal) or dinner (except when people have cold cuts, bread and coffee in the evening).

    • Gemma Stafford on July 11, 2019 at 2:23 pm

      Thanks for sharing! Having them with coffee sounds LOVELY! I should give that a go! Gemma 😊

      • Debora Carvalho on July 11, 2019 at 4:38 pm

        If you’re trying an even more delicious experience, try them with dulce de leche or cream cheese inside. It’s to die for!

        • Gemma Stafford on July 12, 2019 at 8:34 am

          YUM!

  3. Katie on July 11, 2019 at 7:25 am

    My cleaning ladies are from Brazil and they are at my house now! I can’t wait show them

    • Gemma Stafford on July 11, 2019 at 1:39 pm

      I do hope they enjoy it! Gemma 😊

  4. Patricia Sheffield on July 10, 2019 at 10:31 am

    What attachment do you use when dough is transferred to the mixer?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 11, 2019 at 5:22 am

      Patricia, thank you for reminding me to add this to the instructions, I will do it right now.
      The BEATER is the best tool for this job, it will be strong enough to bring the dough together really quickly.
      Thank you for being in touch, I hope you enjoy this recipe,
      Gemma 🙂

  5. noorull on July 9, 2019 at 5:53 pm

    can i use normal flour instead of tapioca flour..

    • Gemma Stafford on July 11, 2019 at 4:50 am

      Hi there,
      yes, but it will be a totally different thing.
      Plain white/all-purpose flour is used to make a similar thing in France, gougere, more like a choux pastry, but very delicious too.
      Try it, it is always worth experimenting. You should be able to sub this out 1:1 but I have not tried it.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

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