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How to Make Self-Raising Flour (Bold Baking Basics)

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Hi Bold Bakers!

I use Self-Raising flour in a lot of my cake recipes. It’s quite a common flour to use in your baking in Ireland. However it is not always available in stores around the world. I don’t want a simple thing like flour to keep you from making my recipes so I’m going to show you how you can make it easily yourself. You will get the same results as store bought, and you can make it just as you need it. What do you need? All purpose flour and baking powder, that’s it!

Working as a professional chef I have learned a lot of tip and tricks over the years. Now I’m going to show you some Bold Baking Basic that will equip you with the tools and skills to be able to tackle any baking endeavor in the kitchen.

How to make your own flour is important because every country sells different products. Also, find out how to make your own Cake Flour for the softest results.

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In the U.S., salt is often added to their Self-Rasing Flour. I choose not to but you can add 1/4 tsp per cup of flour. If you dip your finger into American Self-Rasing flour you will absolutely taste the salt. I always use salted butter and add salt into my baking so I choose not to add it to my flour mix.

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This Self-Raising flour can be used in my Sticky Toffee Pudding in a Mug and many more of my Big & Bold recipe. And you can get more Bold Baking Basics including my Best Ever Buttercream Frosting, DIY condensed milk, How to Temper Chocolate and many more!

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How to Make Self-Raising Flour
 
Prep time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 1 cup
Ingredients
  • 1 Cup / 5oz / 150g all purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons of baking powder
Instructions
  1. For every 1 cup of flour you need, simply add the baking powder to the flour. Sift the flour and baking powder together into a bowl before using, to make sure the baking powder is thoroughly distributed.
  2. Label an airtight container with the name and date so you remember what it is and when you made it. Use within 8 weeks.

 

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Katherine Cowgill by Teren Oddo Oct. 2015

Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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26 Comments

  1. Sherry on February 25, 2018 at 8:51 am

    I was taught in school that you had to use flour, baking powder and salt to make self rising flour. I noticed you didn’t add the salt. Is that a big deal? Does it change the flavor?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 26, 2018 at 6:50 am

      Hi Sherry,
      Generally you would add salt to a bake when you are making a recipe, according to what you are baking. I have not know this to be a part of Self Raising flour per se!
      There would be a danger of over salting if it were in the flour already.
      good point though, it may be best practice in some places.
      Thank you for being in touch,
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Bianca M Farr on February 10, 2018 at 8:09 pm

    Hi there

    Thanks for your wonderful recipes.

    I have a auestion:

    Can I use oat flour instead of all purpose flour. Thanks so much for your kindness in sharing.

    Keep up the good work and good luck!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 11, 2018 at 12:58 pm

      Hi Bianca,

      Really glad you like my recipes. Unfortunately I don’t think you can use oat flour here. Oat flour is very different to all purpose flour.

      Hope this helps,
      Gemma.

  3. hania jehangir on January 10, 2018 at 9:23 am

    Hi Gemma!
    plz tell me how can i know that which flour has how much gluten.Also tell me how to make bread flour.Lastly if we r using self raising flour then do we have to add baking powder or not.

    • Gemma Stafford on January 10, 2018 at 8:30 pm

      Hi,

      I think I already answered this comment. I hope you saw my answer.

      Gemma.

  4. hania jehangir on January 9, 2018 at 12:03 pm

    Hi dear Gemma!
    plz tell me how can i know that which flor has how much gluten.Also tell me how can we make bread flour.Lastly,when we r using self raising flour then do we have to add baking powder separetly as well.Thanku

    • Gemma Stafford on January 9, 2018 at 5:36 pm

      Hi,

      Yes when one of my recipes calls for self rising flour still add in the rising agents in the recipe.

      you can make bread flour by adding vital wheat gluten to all purpose flour. However I often use ap flour instead of bread flour as there are only a 3% in the difference of gluten.

      Gemma.

      • hania jehangir on January 10, 2018 at 9:28 am

        Thanku v much for ur kind response.Can u guide me how much of wheat flour should i add to make bread flour.

  5. Glo on May 2, 2017 at 8:34 am

    Educative.

    • Gemma Stafford on May 3, 2017 at 12:53 am

      Thank you 🙂

      • HarryHadi on January 5, 2018 at 8:13 pm

        Hi!Gemma mam your way to teach is simple n your baking is amazing i m so impressed.

        • Gemma Stafford on January 6, 2018 at 4:19 am

          Hi Harry,
          Thank you. It is good to have you with us, stay tuned,
          Gemma 🙂

  6. Catalina on February 1, 2017 at 3:18 pm

    Hi Gemma! Can you tell us the amount of baking powder in grams? Thanks 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on February 2, 2017 at 8:47 am

      There are 5grams in one teaspoon, so for this recipe it is two teaspoons, 10 grams,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Catalina on March 6, 2017 at 9:07 am

        Thank you, Gemma 🙂

  7. Grace on January 7, 2017 at 5:24 am

    Hi Gemma, if I’m using your self raising flour and a recipe calls for baking powder and soda do I skip them? Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on January 11, 2017 at 2:39 am

      hi Grace,
      YES! one form of raising agent is enough. Bicarb/baking soda is usually balanced wit cream of tartar in baking powder, which is what self raising flour is made from,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Liz rarity on November 17, 2016 at 7:21 pm

    The cake in a mug did not work I tried it about 6 and failed I don’t know why

    • Gemma Stafford on November 18, 2016 at 6:16 am

      Hi Liz, I do not know why either! these recipes work for other bold bakers, are you following the recipe exactly? If you change the recipe you change the result. If I am to help you I need more details! Gemma 😉

  9. mathew on October 24, 2016 at 12:57 pm

    Thanks for your recipe…

    • Gemma Stafford on October 24, 2016 at 9:03 pm

      glad you liked it 🙂

  10. Chintana Kashyap on October 21, 2016 at 12:12 am

    Hi Gemma. If we are using unsalted butter in our recipes and adding salt separately do u think it’s better to leave out the salt in self raising flour?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 21, 2016 at 1:29 am

      When you use self raising flour you do not need to use so much salt, particularly if you are using salted butter, and depending on the recipe too.
      I would say leave it out of sweet/cake type recipes. It is not necessary, Gemma 🙂

  11. Srashti on October 18, 2016 at 5:54 am

    Do we have to add baking powder and soda bicarbonate again while preparing our batter if we’re using self raising flour? And what’s the difference between cake flour and self raising flour and when should they be used? Sorry I asked a lot of questions in one go ?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 19, 2016 at 1:50 am

      Hi there,
      •All-Purpose Flour (Plain flour) is your go-to kind of everyday flour, with a protein content that can range from 9~12%. Unbleached flour tends to have a higher protein content, and it is definitely a better choice compared to bleached. The gluten content varies with the harvest season, region of production, freshness, and many other factors.
      •Bread Flour is a high gluten flour which contains about 13% protein, and it is, of course, best for bread.
      •Pastry Flour is a finer, lower gluten kind of flour that is best suited for sweet baked goods like cakes and cookies. It has a very soft texture.
      •Cake Flour is even finer and lower in gluten than pastry flour. It might be good for baked goods that need an especially soft and fluffy texture and do not need to withstand a long proofing process.
      •Some people will say that Self-raising Flour should just be left in the shelf where it stands. If you want great results in baking, learn how to use and measure your own yeast and baking powders.
      🙂

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