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How to Make Yogurt - This is the best yogurt recipe I have found AND you don’t need any special equipment or thermometers.

How to Make Yogurt (Bold Baking Basics)

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Easily make Yogurt at home and use it with my Frozen Yogurt recipe, Yogurt Pops and more!


Hi Bold Bakers!

I’m going to show you how to make Yogurt at home without any special equipment or thermometers. There are a few simple steps to follow and once you do then you are on your way to delicious homemade Yogurt. Ok, let’s get started…

Heat the milk low and slow:  

This is called scalding the milk.  You want to bring your milk to a simmer over a low and controlled heat. It takes time, roughly 20 minutes. You will know when it is ready because it will have formed a skin and the bubbles will be trying to come up to the surface. Be patient as it is an important step. 

Let it cool down to the blood temperature:

You can test by placing your finger in there and if you can’t feel the milk around your finger then it is at blood temperature. Next step is to stir in some yogurt.

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Wait, I need Yogurt to make Yogurt?

Now I know what you are thinking, ”I don’t have yogurt, that’s why I’m making it.” With all the yogurt making you need to add a yogurt starter to make it “grow.” Yogurt is a living thing and you need to feed it to help it grow, just like bread. If you don’t have access to yogurt you can buy an inexpensive Yogurt starter online.

Wrap it up warm:

Here you are creating a little bed for your yogurt to hang out in for the next 14 hours. The more snug he is, the better and thicker your yogurt. Remember yogurt is a live culture so as a living thing he likes to be warm and comfy, just like bread.

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Adding flavor:

Once cold you can flavor your yogurt with honey, sweetener, vanilla or fruit. Keep in the fridge for 3 weeks.

When you make this yogurt, try it with my Homemade Granola or Microwave Granola. Or make Homemade Frozen Yogurt.

4.58 from 14 votes
How to Make Yogurt - This is the best yogurt recipe I have found AND you don’t need any special equipment or thermometers.
How to Make Yogurt
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
50 mins
 

Learn how to make yogurt at home with my easy yogurt recipe.

Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Servings: 2 cups
Calories: 161 kcal
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
  • 2 cups (16oz / 500ml) Whole milk*
  • 2 tablespoons plain yogurt OR Yogurt starter
Instructions
  1. In a heavy bottomed saucepan, over low heat bring the milk to a simmer. It will take around 15-20 minutes. The freshest milk will yield you better yogurt.
  2. Once it starts to bubble turn off the heat and set aside. You notice a skin has formed on your milk, that is normal.
  3. Let it cool down to the blood temperature. You can test by place your finger in there and if you can’t feel the milk around your finger then it is at blood temperature.
  4. Once cooled whisk in the yogurt or Yogurt starter. Pour into a sterilized jar and tightly close the lid. Note: You can sterilize your jars by placing some water in them and popping them into the microwave until the water steams.
  5. Line a deep bowl with a thick tea towel and place in the jar of yogurt. Wrap the jar up well in the towel and let it sit out in a warm part of your kitchen for 14-18 hours. (I use two tea towels to keep the yogurt warm and snug. Essentially you are creating an incubator for it to set)
  6. After this time, pop the jar in the fridge and let it get cold, roughly 2-3 hours. Once chilled your yogurt will be firm and thick in texture. (the thickness can vary. If yours did not thicken double check your steps and timing )
  7. At this point you can add sugar, sweetener, honey, fruit and vanilla.
  8. Keep in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.

Watch the Recipe Video!

Recipe Notes

You can make Yogurt using dairy free milk like nut, soy and coconut.

Nutrition Facts
How to Make Yogurt
Amount Per Serving (2 cups)
Calories 161 Calories from Fat 72
% Daily Value*
Fat 8g12%
Saturated Fat 4g25%
Cholesterol 27mg9%
Sodium 114mg5%
Potassium 353mg10%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Sugar 13g14%
Protein 8g16%
Vitamin A 395IU8%
Calcium 300mg30%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

 

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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146 Comments

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  1. Caroline on August 15, 2019 at 1:30 am

    Hi Gemma, how can you make yoghurt using lactose free milk, and if so do I follow your same recipe. Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on August 15, 2019 at 2:12 am

      Hi Caroline,
      you can make yogurt from lactose-free milk in the same way as any milk. Lactose is just the sugar of milk, it will not affect the fermentation.
      Try it! Try a sample. Use lactose-free yogurt to start it, or ask for a pro-biotic starter in your health food store, or online.
      If you like a thick, greek style yogurt then you strain it, in a fine cheesecloth/kitchen cloth, in a sieve, over a bowl in the fridge overnight!
      Experiment a bit, it will be worth it for you,
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Pam on August 7, 2019 at 1:51 pm

    I see in the notes that coconut milk can be used. Have you actually tried it and how did it turn out?

    • Gemma Stafford on August 8, 2019 at 1:54 am

      Hi Pam,
      you can make yogurt with coconut milk but you will need to use a probiotic powder (from a capsule) for best results.
      I suggest you google this one, there are a number of techniques for this, but you will get the best results using a starter.
      Yogurt is fermented milk, animal milk ferments easily nut milk less easily without a starter. Your health food store will have these capsules, good for your digestive system too, win-win!
      Gemma 🙂

  3. RF74 on July 29, 2019 at 8:27 pm

    I hadn’t used my yogurt maker for a very long time, so I made one batch following the instruction. 7 jars in there and 1 extra jar in your method. The yogurt maker made lumpy yogurt and yours turned out so smooth! I wish I could have known you earlier! So I wouldn’t buy the yogurt maker, the bread maker which literally was used once, the ice cream maker which takes forever to make a tiny bit , the electric crepe maker…

    • Gemma Stafford on July 30, 2019 at 8:28 am

      Oh gosh I wish you had known me before that also. Absolutely no need for those machines but you are not alone as so many people have them.

      Stick with me and I’ll show you how to bake with the simplest pieces of equipment.
      Gemma 🙂

  4. Suha on July 21, 2019 at 8:54 am

    Hi! Will homemade oat milk work for this recipe?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 21, 2019 at 7:26 pm

      Hi,

      Maybe someone else will correct me if I’m wrong but you will need some sort of acid/starter to add to the oat milk. So you might need to buy a dairy free plain yogurt to help it along.

      Hope this makes sense,
      Gemma.

  5. Karina Le-Talbot on July 12, 2019 at 1:29 pm

    Can this be frozen please?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 12, 2019 at 2:50 pm

      Hi Karina! Yogurt texture tends to change when frozen. I do not recommend it. It should last a good 3 weeks in the fridge. Gemma 😊

  6. Becky Saunders on June 11, 2019 at 4:29 pm

    Hi Gemma, Quick question. You say 2 tbsp of yogurt or yogurt starter. I bought some yogurt starter (culture) & the directions there say to add one pack of it (5g) to 42 oz of milk. Your recipe calls for 2 tbsp to 2 cups of milk. I measured out the packet & it is not even 1 full tablespoon – close though. I’m thinking I only need to add 1/4 to 1/2 of this Yogurt Culture (5g) to the 16 oz of milk that your recipe calls for? Would that be a correct assumption? Thanks so much & enjoy the recipes.

    • Becky Saunders on June 11, 2019 at 4:33 pm

      I just measured the culture out (freeze dried if that matters) & it is 1 1/2 tsp. Thinking 1/2 tsp to 16 oz?

    • Gemma Stafford on June 12, 2019 at 10:29 am

      Hi Becky! This is a little bit of math. I would follow the recommendation on your starter’s packet. Looks like the 5g of starter will work with 42oz of milk and that is already a little over 5 cups of milk. And in time, yogurt! You’ll be grand. And you can certainly use 2tbsp of your yogurt for next time. Gemma 😊

  7. Ann Zaff on June 2, 2019 at 4:45 pm

    Please Gemma
    I live Greek Yogurt and don’t like yogurt. How do I make Greek Yogurt?

    • Gemma Stafford on June 3, 2019 at 8:32 am

      Hi Ann,
      This is a good question. Greek yogurt is strained to make it thick. This process removes some of the whey/water content and also a little of the flavor, ad this may be why you like it, it is not so sharp. When you make yogurt the next step is to use a sterile cloth, a very fine one, or cheesecloth, in a sieve, over a bowl in the fridge. It will drain in about 8 hours. The yogurt will stay in the cloth, and the whey will be in the bowl. You can use the whey in other recipes, smoothies or as a marinade for meats. You can also use it in your baking.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Chris on May 31, 2019 at 9:39 pm

    Hi Gemma
    To make a new batch, do I use some of this yogurt as my starter.

    • Gemma Stafford on May 31, 2019 at 11:05 pm

      Hi Chris,

      yes that is exactly what you do!! And then so on and so on.

      Best,
      Gemma.

  9. Gemma Stafford on May 19, 2019 at 4:07 pm

    Delighted to hear that, Elizbe.

    Thanks for trying it out 🙂
    Gemma.

  10. Joseph on May 6, 2019 at 12:08 am

    Hi Gemma, wanted to know if UHT processed milk can work in this recipe and if probiotic supplement capsules (contains at least 9 probiotic strains) can be used as a starter? Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on May 6, 2019 at 4:11 am

      Hi Joseph,
      I am told yes, but honestly I am not too sure. I think it depends on the strains of bacteria contained in the capsule, the potency of them and the age of the capsule. The suggested strains of bacteria for a good culture are Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus casei, these will be found in the cultures provided by various online providers. We just use a good quality strained natural yogurt here, no thickeners, just yogurt, organic if possible. Do a little search online for providers of cultures, there are a number of them depending on where you live. It is worth reading up on this subject if you wish to take it further than we have done here.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on May 6, 2019 at 4:21 am

      Hi Joseph,
      Omitted to say that the best possible milk for yogurt making is fresh, full-fat milk from grass-fed cows.
      Then the rest in case it was lost:
      I am told yes, but honestly I am not too sure. I think it depends on the strains of bacteria contained in the capsule, the potency of them and the age of the capsule. The suggested strains of bacteria for a good culture are Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and Lactobacillus casei, these will be found in the cultures provided by various online providers. We just use a good quality strained natural yogurt here, no thickeners, just yogurt, organic if possible. Do a little search online for providers of cultures, there are a number of them depending on where you live. It is worth reading up on this subject if you wish to take it further than we have done here.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Ichah Hanin on April 8, 2019 at 11:32 pm

    i made this but using the microwave and it worked out FANTASTIC! microwaved the milk for a minute and then wait for it to cool to blood temperature and then i followed your procedure. it was AMAZING! im so happy that it is sooooo easy <3

    • Gemma Stafford on April 9, 2019 at 5:32 am

      Hi there,
      clever you! well done, it is amazing how the old way to do things are gradually being revived at home.
      Thank you for your input and review,
      Gemma 🙂

  12. Kristine Bishop on April 2, 2019 at 7:40 pm

    You mention in this video about using non-dairy milk. Is the recipe the same? And is yogurt starter dairy-free as well?

    • Gemma Stafford on April 3, 2019 at 2:36 am

      Hi Kristine,
      Yes! The best milk for this type of recipe will be a mammal milk, goat milk for instance. However you can culture other milks too. I suggest you google this, I would need to work it out to get the proportions right. Yes, you will use a non dairy yogurt, or a commercially produced starter. This may be the ideal for you if you have dairy allergies. Worth really investigating this for yourself, do a little research.
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Archana Chaphekar on March 10, 2019 at 3:22 am

    Is this same like making curd ? Being indian I have always had big question about curd and yogurt… What exactly is the difference … ??
    Btw, tried your recipes of frozen yoghurts with store bought Greek yoghurt… Came out winner !!!

    • Gemma Stafford on March 11, 2019 at 9:42 am

      Hi, yes it is similar. I’m delighted to hear you liked the recipes!

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