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How to make Brown Sugar - For those times you need brown sugar but all you have is white! Now you can easily make your own with just 2 ingredients.

How to Make Brown Sugar (Bold Baking Basics)

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Hi Bold Bakers!

Brown Sugar is a fantastic ingredient in baking that shouldn’t be left out. It adds a caramel flavor and depth to recipes. I know it’s not available in all countries but I don’t want you to leave it out of your baking so I’m going to show you how to make it so you never have to leave it out again.

It couldn’t be simpler to make your own Brown Sugar, just mix together sugar and molasses (or treacle).

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This makes a light brown sugar: it is slightly caramel in flavor and is golden in color. 

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Store in an air-tight container for months. Brown Sugar has a tendency to clump together. To prevent this add a slice of white bread in the container and that will keep the sugar dry and fine.

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To make Dark Brown Sugar it’s the same deal. You just want to double down on the molasses. You will see, feel and smell a big difference between the Light and Dark Brown Sugar. The dark has an even richer, deeper caramel flavor.

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Brown Sugar is ESSENTIAL in recipes like my Chocolate Chip Cookie, Brownie Recipe, Sticky Toffee Pudding in a Mug and Gingerbread. All of these recipes have something in common, they have a caramel flavor with a gooey, treacly texture. Brown Sugar does that, that’s why I don’t want you to leave it out.

This recipe is part of my Bold Baking Basics Series. There you will find useful recipes like How to Make Cake Flour, How to Make Buttermilk and lots more to help you become a better Bold Baker.

5 from 12 votes
How to make Brown Sugar - For those times you need brown sugar but all you have is white! Now you can easily make your own with just 2 ingredients.
How to Make Brown Sugar (Bold Baking Basics)
Author: Gemma Stafford
Ingredients
  • Light Brown sugar
  • 1 Cup (8 oz/240g) white sugar
  • 1 teaspoons molasses (treacle)
  • Dark Brown sugar
  • 1 Cup (8 oz/240g) white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons molasses (treacle)
Instructions
  1. Combine sugar and molasses in a mixing bowl. Using your fingertips rub in the molasses until the molasses is completely incorporated and the sugar turns brown.
  2. Store in an air-tight container for months. Because of the moisture, brown sugar has a tendency to clump together, to prevent this add a slice of white bread in the container and that will keep the sugar dry and fine.

 

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Meet Gemma

Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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95 Comments

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  1. Bouchra on July 6, 2018 at 12:27 am

    Hi Gemma. This is a great DIY but we don’t have any molasses down here. What can I substitute it for? Thanks in advance

    • Gemma Stafford on July 6, 2018 at 3:41 am

      Hi there,
      If you live in India or Pakistan you may find jaggery, this is a raw brown sugar, and a delicious thing.
      Molasses is a by product of the sugar refining process, it is the good stuff, removed, to make white sugar. It can be found in al sorts of places, because it is also extracted in the refining of coconut sugar/palm sugar/beet sugar/cane sugar. It is called treacle in some places, and black strap molasses is the most nutritious. So, ask around, you may find it, but if you can get brown sugar you will not need this recipe so much.
      Gemma 🙂

  2. Doola on June 26, 2018 at 5:16 am

    Thank you Gemma, for making baking so very exciting. Love you! Have learnt so much from you.

    • Gemma Stafford on June 26, 2018 at 9:03 pm

      Thank you so much 🙂

      Gemma.

  3. Nikki on June 25, 2018 at 1:20 am

    Hi Gemma! Instead of a piece of bread, may I suggest a brown sugar bear? It’s a terra-cotta bear that you soak in water for 15 minutes, dry off and add to your brown sugar container. IT will keep your brown sugar fresh for months! I absolutely love mine! And I love your brown sugar recipe! Made it when I was in a pinch for brown sugar and I won’t use anything else now!

    • Gemma Stafford on June 25, 2018 at 2:09 am

      Hi Nikki,
      Well I never! Haha, I did not know about this bear, but I will now be seeking it out, what a great idea!
      Thank you for letting us know,
      Gemma 🙂

  4. Aamenahsajid on June 9, 2018 at 3:01 pm

    What’s molasses ???

    • Gemma Stafford on June 10, 2018 at 3:04 am

      Hi there,
      Molasses is what is removed from sugar cane/beets/coconut/palm etc to make a white crystal sugar. Actually it is the part of the plant which is most nourishing. It is processed separately and sold in health food stores. Black strap molasses being the top of the range. Treacle is molasses too. Jaggery, which is a rock type sugar contains it’s molasses, as do some organic brown sugars.
      I hope this is of help,
      Gemma 🙂

      • britney on June 18, 2018 at 5:09 pm

        Hi Gemma, im new to all of this cooking stuff and for these videos you made on brown suger i have a question what if you didn’t have molasses in stores where i live?

        • Gemma Stafford on June 19, 2018 at 2:12 am

          Hi Britney,
          Molasses is the substance removed from sugar cane/sugar beet/coconut/palm etc in the process of making white sugar. There are nutrients in this, and when you buy brown sugar, which is regarded as being more healthy, some of this has remained in the sugar, or has been added back. In health food stores you will find ‘Black Strap Molasses’ which is the highest grade of this substance. In your local store you may find ‘Treacle’ which is also a grade of molasses.
          In your store you may find brown sugar, in different grades of color, origin etc. Some are organic and these tend to be golden to very dark. The darker they are the less processed, though you cannot be sure of this. Jaggery is a type of sugar readily available in places like India, and this is largely unprocessed.
          So, really it depends on where you live, but take a look in your store, you may be surprised by what is actually there,
          Gemma 🙂

  5. aida on June 5, 2018 at 12:20 am

    Hi Gemma,so if using jaggery,how much should I substitute for 1 cup brown sugar? could you reply at the earliest please… looking forward to make chocolate chip cookies for my toddlers

    • Gemma Stafford on June 5, 2018 at 2:31 am

      Hi Aida,
      Jaggery is brown sugar. You substitute it like for like. I presume you are buying is ground into crystals, if not grind it first,
      Gemma 🙂

  6. Karine on May 5, 2018 at 12:44 am

    Hi ! First of all I love your videos (recipes and your Energy!). Then, my question is : for the Brown sugar recipe could i use it immediately or should i wait months before using it? (Sorry for my english, I’m french)

    • Gemma Stafford on May 5, 2018 at 10:39 am

      Hi Karine,
      Thank you for your kind words.
      You can use this as you wish, right away, or store it. Add a slice of bread, or a marshmallow to keep it free flowing,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Karine on May 19, 2018 at 7:26 am

        hi Gemma! Thanks for replying. I’ve finally found the molasses in a bio store! I will be able to make my own brown sugar 🙂
        one last question: is there a difference for a recipe if the brown sugar is free flowing or compact?

        • Gemma Stafford on May 20, 2018 at 9:02 am

          Free, kind of loose is perfectly fine, Karine.

          Best,
          Gemma.

  7. Melanie on January 26, 2018 at 5:13 am

    Hi Gemma,
    When you say white sugar, which do you mean Caster Sugar or Granulated Sugar?
    Thanks
    P.s. love the videos

    • Gemma Stafford on January 26, 2018 at 5:21 am

      Good question Melanie,
      In the US there is one white sugar, and it is a fine one, like caster sugar, so it is the same thing.
      In UK, Ireland and other places there are tow grades of this, and either one will work for you.
      Gemma 🙂

  8. Tasbeeh on November 29, 2017 at 7:31 am

    That’s great gemma thanks a lot..
    I am from a country where chocolate is very expensive..
    I would be grateful if you share me a recpie of how to make it from coco powder

    • Gemma Stafford on November 30, 2017 at 5:12 am

      Hi,

      Glad you like this recipe. I’ll have to look into how to make cocoa. I don’t know if that’s possible at home. Try ordering it online, you might find it cheaper.

      Gemma.

  9. LadyIreland on November 22, 2017 at 10:11 am

    Good morning my AWESOME fellow foodie!! One question. I went to the store for molasses to make brown sugar and was faced with Sulfered and Unsulfered. Which should I use? Is there a big difference? Also is there a rule of thumb when using extracts? I thought of making Rootbeer Float Ice Cream or frosting but not sure how to go about it.

    • Gemma Stafford on November 22, 2017 at 1:38 pm

      Great question Karen,
      this is not the easiest thing to explain, and i am not sure That I have it right, not being a real scientist! However it is worthy of some attempt at an explanation, though a simple one! Sulphur dioxide is added to sugar cane when young in order to help preserve it, and preserve the product, to give it a long shelf life. What this does to the molasses in terms of nutrition I really do not know! In times past sugar cane was sundried before processing, but we are in a hurry these days to get from crop to payment, and this speeds up the process.
      Black strap molasses is the result of three passes through the processing stages, and is regarded as having the higher nutritional values.
      as far as I know there are no particular worries about sulphering molasses, though if there are allergies to this, or any other substance it is worth avoiding.
      I use whatever comes to hand! I really do not engage too much with it! Now that you mention it I may look for the one which has no sulpher, I reall did not think about it before 🙂
      Gemma 🙂

      • LadyIreland on November 30, 2017 at 9:05 am

        I found the answer! Sulfured molasses is made from immature, green sugarcane that is then treated with sulfur fumes during the sugar extracting process whereas Grandma’s unsulfured molasses is made of the finest quality, pure unsulfured juice of sun-ripened sugarcane. So I guess either will work. I did find that Blackstrap has higher iron content, folate, b vitamins, magnesium and calcium, potassium. The American Heart Association includes unsulphured blackstrap molasses as food supportive of good heart health. Although it needs an aquired taste as it isn’t as sweet.

        • Gemma Stafford on November 30, 2017 at 7:32 pm

          Great! And I learned something new 🙂

          Gemma.

          • Scuba Steve on March 24, 2018 at 9:19 am

            I think you got trolled by a Grandma’s rep:)



          • Gemma Stafford on March 24, 2018 at 12:48 pm

            Hi there,
            I used an 8 x 8 inch pan. You can increase this recipe easily for a larger pan, or reduce it, it is forgiving,
            Gemma 🙂



  10. prydblomst on July 24, 2017 at 2:42 am

    I love that this video exists as it’s near impossible to find any kind of brown sugar where I live… However, it’s equally impossible to find molasses :/ I’m assuming I can’t use dark syrup or something instead?

    • Gemma Stafford on July 24, 2017 at 7:31 am

      Hi there,
      I am presuming you mean a dark corn syrup! or treacle!
      You can use either one of these to make your brown sugar, in the same proportion as the recipe, it will be good,
      Gemma 🙂

  11. Yvonne on June 25, 2017 at 1:07 pm

    I love all your hacks,tips,tricks and recipes!
    My question is, I mixed and rubbed till my hands and arms were sore, but I still have chunks,bits and specks of molasses in the sugar. Perhaps our sugar here has a lower moisture content? Any suggestions?
    Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on June 28, 2017 at 6:45 am

      So honestly If you cant get it to work the whole way through then just sieve out any lumps of molasses you find 🙂

  12. sarasuleman on December 27, 2016 at 5:25 am

    hi gemma how to make home made molasses

    • Gemma Stafford on December 28, 2016 at 3:14 am

      Hi there, you can’t! This is a bi-product of the sugar manufacturing process, it is what they take out to refine sugar to white!
      Brown sugar has some in there, the darker the sugar the more molasses contained in it.
      Treacle is also molasses, and palm sugar/coconut sugar also has a molasses! Take a look around your grocery store,
      Gemma 🙂

  13. Austin on December 26, 2016 at 7:11 pm

    Hi Gemma, Quick question. Does the bread mold up or expire while it is in the brown sugar? Do you have to change it out? Thank you!!!

    • Gemma Stafford on December 27, 2016 at 2:59 am

      Hi Austin,
      Actually the bread hardens, and does not go moldy. It can be removed after a week or so, when it has done its’ job!
      Gemma 🙂

  14. Kelly Hamilton on December 9, 2016 at 12:57 pm

    Oh,
    For cheese allergies due to casein protein allergy, does goat cheese make for a good cheese substitute for cheddar…havent tried goat cheese mac and cheese yet…just wandering.

    • Gemma Stafford on December 9, 2016 at 1:27 pm

      I did a little research on this one. I had an allergy to cows milk when I was a baby, which I grew out of, but was on goats milk for a long time. The protein molecuses are different from cows milk, the alpha S1 cassein seems to be the problem one, and goats milk is low in this. Then it is a matter of your taste, I love goats cheese, especially when it is cooked, so no bruschetta, quiche etc. Do try this, and do a little research on the casein protein too.
      It is good to have you with us, and thank you for your kind comments, Gemma 🙂

  15. Kelly Hamilton on December 9, 2016 at 12:55 pm

    Gemma,

    All I can say is you’re awesome. I love your recipes and I just purchased your meals in a mug cookbook. I love that you tell us how to substitute for dairy and I love using egg yolks. My handicapped sister is allergic to dairy and egg whites, so using yolks and almond milk is great! I find almond milk (plain unsweetened) has a funny taste in recipes, so using cashew milk actually is less strong and makes it taste better. Thank you!

  16. Shan k.meer on November 19, 2016 at 12:21 pm

    I love your accent….?

    • Gemma Stafford on November 20, 2016 at 9:59 am

      Hi there,
      I am Irish! with a touch of California, I am told!
      Gemma 🙂

  17. Ayisha on November 12, 2016 at 9:09 pm

    Hi ,Gemma
    I am 10years old.but I really made Your Ice cream.It was delicious.I wonder if you can make a tiramisu ice cream .

    Love from India

  18. Fiza on October 18, 2016 at 6:57 am

    Hii gemma that’s a great recipe but what if u dint have molasses. I live in india and we don’t have molasses or treacle here! Isn’t there any other substitute ? I wish there is bcz I m about to make chocolate chip cookies but now I think I couldn’t ????

    • Gemma Stafford on October 19, 2016 at 1:42 am

      Hi Fiza, jaggery is a form of brown sugar, if you can get this, you will not need to make your own. Molasses is a bi product of sugar production, it is can be called Treacle, or Black Strap Molasses in some places 🙂

  19. Svenja Geissler on October 15, 2016 at 12:26 am

    Hi Gemma
    I was wondering, do you know of anything I can substitute corn syrup with?

    • Gemma Stafford on October 15, 2016 at 2:04 am

      Hi there, yes, sugar syrup! this is just sugar and water, sugar melted, boiled to what is called the soft ball stage, where the syrup is thick and viscous, without being colored! I will do this on my basics series. In the meantime google it, in theory you need a sugar thermometer. 🙂

  20. Rachely on October 10, 2016 at 10:17 am

    Hi Gemma,
    You are the best! You always publishe the right recipe exactly when I need it.
    Is molasses and golden syrup the same?
    Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on October 11, 2016 at 1:57 am

      Hi Rachel, thank you for your kind words. No! molasses is a byproduct of sugar production, what is taken out of the sugar source, cane, beet etc. We would find it commonly as treacle, or labeled molasses in the baking aisle, depending on where you live. Golden syrup is a caramelized sugar – really!
      Gemma 🙂

  21. Jagoo on October 2, 2016 at 2:45 am

    We can use jaggery powder instead of brown sugar because in oir country jaggery eadily available . Thanks

    • Gemma Stafford on October 2, 2016 at 3:12 am

      Yes, and it really is the same thing! Gemma 🙂

  22. Vaishali on September 22, 2016 at 4:02 am

    I love u and ur recipes, they turn out the best. Ur ice-cream is hit in my family. Hey Gemma! I would like to give u a big hug for all the efforts u put on to give us the best recipes. Now my next try is caramel cheese cakes. Love u loads.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 23, 2016 at 2:15 am

      Ha ha! Thank you for your kind virtual hug, i appreciate it!
      Gemma 🙂

  23. Vivien Hursey on September 19, 2016 at 9:59 am

    I love your videos so much. I really need a simple oatmeal raisin recipe please.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 20, 2016 at 1:00 pm

      Vivien, do you mean a cookie recipe, mug recipe, not sure what you mean! 🙂

      • lilviv66 on September 20, 2016 at 1:57 pm

        Both please

  24. Alice on September 11, 2016 at 10:10 am

    Dear Gemma,
    Thank you for adding this recipe. It helps me a lot. The brown sugar is very expensive in my country, so it is very helpful.
    I was afraid to do the dark brown, so I’ve made slightly light – I could attached a picture but I do not know how (unfortunately). 🙁
    Take care!
    I look forward to your new recipes.
    Alice

    • Gemma Stafford on September 12, 2016 at 1:36 am

      Thank you Alice, I am happy that this is useful for you, Gemma 🙂

  25. Ann on September 9, 2016 at 10:42 pm

    Hey Gemma,
    Here in India we get jaggery ( made from sugarcane)in liquid form, which looks exactly like molasses/treacle.It’s sweet, syrupy and golden brown.Could they be the same?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 12, 2016 at 3:05 am

      Hi ann, yes it is the same thing, it is a molasses. It is also possible to find molasses from Palm sugar, pomegranate, depending on where you live 🙂

      • Ann on September 12, 2016 at 10:38 pm

        Hi Gemma , thank you for clarifying. Cookie dough here I come!?

  26. Denise on September 8, 2016 at 10:49 am

    Marshmallows will also serve the same purpose as the bread. 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2016 at 1:32 pm

      Really! this is a new one for me, i am learning, did you know the grape one – they dry like raisins 🙂

      • Noor on September 11, 2016 at 4:48 am

        Ohhhh Gemma, you are amazing!!! The bread slice trick saved my life. I used to struggle every time I get the brown sugar of the jar. No more lumps 🙂
        Thanks

        • Gemma Stafford on September 12, 2016 at 1:39 am

          Yea! that is great Noor, thank you for letting me know 🙂

  27. Maggiee04 on September 8, 2016 at 1:05 am

    Thank you so much for this great recipe! ? I will definitely be making this but i have a little concern regarding the sugar i would like to send you a picture of the one i would like to use for this so if you could please email me at maggieee04@gmail.com so I can send it as a picture attachment and get your opinion on it that’d be awesome. ❤️

    • Gemma Stafford on September 9, 2016 at 1:05 am

      Check your email Maggie 🙂

  28. Beverly on September 7, 2016 at 2:08 pm

    My dear lady, you are truly a gem!! Thanks dear.

    • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2016 at 12:28 am

      Beverly, you are kind! 🙂

  29. JapHarneet Kaur on September 6, 2016 at 9:07 am

    Hi there!
    I am living in India and I can’t find corn syrup at all .l had requested before also but I got no response…unfortunately but I love your baking you inspire me….but in most of your candy recipes like marshmallows and fondant require corn syrup and I can’t find it……i tried many other recipes but all were a mere disaster …… I hope you could include this in your next bbb video ?
    Love JapHarneet from India ;?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 7, 2016 at 3:14 am

      Thank you for being with us. Corn syrup is an American thing – a sugar syrup made with corn. Glucose syrup is a similar thing. For some recipes you can use a simple syrup, which is made from white sugar and water, boiled to a soft ball stage – use in sorbets, fondant etc. I will do some of these when I get a moment, my recipes are scheduled a few weeks in advance 🙂

  30. Zukreat Hala on September 6, 2016 at 5:00 am

    Hi Gemma,
    I love your bold baking basics especially this one. But I was wondering if there are any substitutes for whipped cream( heavy cream). I really want to use them in my recipes but here in Srilanka heavy cream is really rare to find and really really expensive compared to the US prices.
    Expecting an answer from u.

    Yours ever,
    Zukreat

    • Gemma Stafford on September 7, 2016 at 3:21 am

      This is cream, which is a natural part of cows’ milk. It is a fresh product, the full fat version of which is known as Double cream and is 49.4% fat content. This is the one which will whip up really quickly and hold its’ shape. It must be kept cold, it will spoil in a day or so if stored at room temperature. There is no substitute which will work in my ice cream recipe.
      In some countries which do not have a dairy industry, and these are generally warmer countries, this product is very hard to come by. Manufactured alternatives, whilst they may be good for some desserts, will not do for this. I am sorry!

      • Zukreat Hala on September 9, 2016 at 6:50 am

        Oh…anyway thnx for letting me know Gemma…i loved your recipes from the time I began to bake when I was eleven years old….anyhow I’ll try my best to become a bold baker just like you…!

        Zukreat

        • Gemma Stafford on September 12, 2016 at 4:15 am

          Ah! it is great to have such lovely young bold bakers with us, keep at it, you will be a great baker in time 🙂

  31. Rabia on September 6, 2016 at 3:43 am

    Hello Gemma , Is jaggery powder or brown sugar same or not

    • Gemma Stafford on September 7, 2016 at 3:29 am

      It really is a brown sugar from another plant source – here in the US and Europe most of our sugar comes from sugar cane or sugar beet, there are different sources in other places 🙂

  32. Mary Green on September 5, 2016 at 8:45 pm

    Thanks, there are a lot of young bakers who will appreciate this suggestion. I learned about it over 45 years ago when living in Germany. Girlfriend’s mom knew this from her rationing days during WWII. My mom knew the bread saver idea; a slice of apple also works.
    Keep up the good work; I always look forward to your posts and recipes. YUM!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:31 am

      Thank you Mary for your kind words, it is great to have input from the other bakers out there,
      Gemma 🙂

  33. Ayesha Nasser on September 5, 2016 at 6:50 pm

    Can you tryout Kulfi? It’s an indian traditional Ice-cream!!!

  34. Tiffany on September 5, 2016 at 2:27 pm

    Thank you so much, Gemma! This is so helpful! Regarding the bread, do you have to change it out every week so it doesn’t go moldy?

    Thank you!

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:38 am

      Hi Tiffany,
      The bread tends to get hard, then you can remove it, it will have done its’ job. You also can use a little bag of rice, made with cheesecloth and leave it on top of the sugar,
      Gemma 🙂

      • Annb on September 7, 2016 at 8:47 am

        You can also throw a grape in the brown sugar to keep it from getting hard. Toss the grape when it turns to a raisin. Yes, it actually turns to a raisin!

        • Gemma Stafford on September 8, 2016 at 12:40 am

          WOW! you guys are great, thank you for this great tip 🙂

  35. AFG on September 5, 2016 at 12:13 pm

    Can molasses ever be substituted for brown sugar (meaning no white sugar is put into the product at all)?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:42 am

      Good question, Molasses is a bi-product of sugar production. It becomes increasingly less sweet as it continues to be processed. We use it in things like gingerbread, (Treacle) where it is added along with sugar, to give a lovely sticky finish to the cake. It is also used in cookies/biscuits to harden them. Black strap molasses is used as a dietary supplement by some people, it is less sweet, ans is generally not used in baking.
      Gemma 🙂

  36. aaliya on September 5, 2016 at 11:33 am

    Hi Gemma can i use date syrup instead of molasses? ?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:42 am

      I think you can, if you mean molasses made as a bi-product of date palm sugar. It is much the same thing,
      Gemma 🙂

  37. Razan EE on September 5, 2016 at 10:53 am

    Hey gemma
    I’d just like to say that I love this recipe
    But I only have one question what kind of store can you buy treacle from ??

    Razan ??????☺?

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:44 am

      Depends on where you live! In the US it is available in the baking aisle of supermarkets, along with Treacle, which is really the same thing. In some countries you may find date syrup/molasses, or other forms of it,
      Gemma 🙂

  38. emirules123 on September 5, 2016 at 9:52 am

    can you make a chocolate mousse cake? please

    • emirules123 on September 5, 2016 at 9:54 am

      chocolate strawberry mousse cake, sorry!

  39. emirules123 on September 5, 2016 at 9:50 am

    this is a great recipe because I don’t have brown sugar in my house but i always have molasses i use it in almost everything! 🙂

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:49 am

      Hi there, It is good to have you with us. I will add your suggestion to my list. do check out all of the recipes here. The Best ever chocolate cake is a good one for your repertoire!
      Gemma 🙂

  40. Fatima on September 5, 2016 at 9:11 am

    Hello Gemma,
    It’s not easy to find here light brown sugar and I wanted to make your cookie dough icecream recipe.
    This recipe came at the perfect time !
    I’m definitely going to make this !
    Thanks again

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:53 am

      That is great Fatima, I am happy to have you with us,
      Gemma 🙂

  41. jagoo on September 5, 2016 at 9:11 am

    this is great , i was thinking to request you to make brown sugar but you did it before i requested ,thanks thank you so much

    • Gemma Stafford on September 6, 2016 at 1:53 am

      Happy to help!
      Gemma 🙂

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