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Get the Ultimate Guide to the different types of chocolate

The Ultimate Guide to the Different Types of Chocolate

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There are many types of chocolate, and not all are created equal — so let’s take an in-depth look at chocolate to help you on your bold baking way!


Hi Bold Bakers!

Information about the Types of Chocolate is not something we think we need, right? But as Bold Bakers, you need to know a few things. Not all chocolate is created equal! So, how do you know what to use and when to use it?

I have the answers! Let’s take a deep dive on the Ultimate Guide to the Different Types of Chocolate and clear up any questions you might have about which chocolate is which and what you should be using in your baking. 

The Different Types of Chocolate

When it comes to baking with the different types of chocolate, you need to pay attention to what types of chocolate the recipe is calling for. Is it bittersweet? Or semi-sweet? Each chocolate is graded by its cocoa solid percentage. Knowing what the cocoa solid percentages actually mean will tell you exactly what type of chocolate you are dealing with.

These are fun facts about chocolate that every Bold Baker should know:

Milk Chocolate  (38 – 42 % cocoa solids)

Milk chocolate is most commonly known as “eating chocolate.” With more sugar added than other types of chocolate, it tends to be on the sweeter side — and less chocolatey.  Milk chocolate usually ranges between 38% and 42% cocoa but can have as little as 10% cocoa solids. If you don’t like your chocolate bitter then this chocolate is for you. This chocolate works great in my S’more Fudge recipe. 

Semisweet (52 – 62 % cocoa solids)

Semisweet chocolate is entry level for those who are new to the darker, more pronounced chocolate flavor. Most commonly found in chip form, they are a standard ingredient in most kitchens. With its sweet flavor and creamy consistency, it is a dream to work with. It melts easily, combines well with other flavors, and is fantastic for dipping. I use this chocolate in my S’more Cheesecake and Chocolate Chip Cookie Pie 

Bittersweet Chocolate (63 – 72 % cocoa solids)

This is my go-to chocolate. Darker and more pronounced in flavor than a semisweet, bittersweet is many chefs’ favorite. However, their higher cocoa solid percentage can make them trickier to work with. With a cocoa solid percentage ranging from 63 – 72%, I find that Bittersweet Chocolate has the perfect balance of bitter and sweet — which makes sense because just look at the name! I think this chocolate works best in my recipes for Best Ever Chocolate Chip Cookies and German Chocolate Cake 

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Unsweetened Chocolate (100% cocoa solids)

Unsweetened chocolate, as the name implies, is 100% cocoa solids with no sugar added. One taste will tell you that it is not meant to be eaten alone, believe me! I like to use a small amount of it in combination with semi- or bittersweet to add a depth of flavor. If you make the mistake of buying a 100% cocoa solids bar without realizing and need to use it up, throw a little into your baking. I usually do maybe 80% bittersweet and 20% unsweetened chocolate.

Chocolate Chips

Chocolate Chips have additives and stabilizers to keep the chocolate from losing its shape. While this is great for cookies and toppings it’s not the best for making things like chocolate ganache or chocolate sauce. If a recipe ever calls for large amounts of chocolate to be melted, I always use a bar of chocolate. Use it in my Chocolate Brownie Cookies and my Triple Grands.

White Chocolate

Since it does not contain cocoa solids, white chocolate is technically not chocolate. White chocolate is made with cocoa butter, sugar, milk solids or powder, and vanilla. It is much lighter in color than milk or dark chocolate because it contains no cocoa solids. The important thing here is that it is made with real cocoa butter, not some other imitation fat, which tastes nothing like chocolate. I love the add it to my Pumpkin and White Chocolate Lava cake and Chocolate Profiteroles. 

Cocoa Powder

Cocoa powder is a mixture of the many substances remaining after cocoa butter is extracted from cacao beans. It’s a pantry staple for any Bold Baker!

Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Unsweetened cocoa powder is pure chocolate with most of the cocoa butter removed. It has an intense chocolate taste and it is what I like to bake with on a day to day bases. I choose unsweetened so I don’t have to alter the sugar in my recipe. Try this in my Hot Chocolate Mix Recipe and Homemade Nutella. 

Dutch Process

Dutch process cocoa powder is chocolate that has been treated with an alkalizing agent to modify its color and give it a milder taste compared to “natural cocoa.” Cocoa powders labeled “Dutch-Process” or “European-Style” have been treated to neutralize the naturally occurring acids, giving them a mellower flavor and redder color. Since Dutch process cocoa isn’t acidic, it doesn’t react with alkaline leavener like baking soda to produce carbon dioxide. That’s why recipes that use Dutch process cocoa are usually leavened by baking powder. I love the color and flavor it adds to my Baileys Chocolate Pudding.

Did you like this baking tip? I have lots more short videos just like this one that will help you get baking confidently in the kitchen. Follow this link for more Bold Baking Basics!

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Hi Bold Bakers! I’m Gemma Stafford, a professional chef originally from Ireland, and I’m passionate about sharing my years of experience to show you how to make game-changing baking recipes with over-the-top results! Join more than 1 Million other Bold Bakers in the community for new video recipes every week!

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21 Comments

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  1. Jessie on February 27, 2019 at 10:57 pm

    Hi Gemma,
    This post is such a good idea!! Thanks so much for the information. There is one thing I’m confused about – what is the difference between cooking chocolate and eating chocolate? For example, when I go to the grocery store there is Cadbury dark chocolate in the confectionary section and Cadbury dark cooking chocolate in the baking section, and both have similar cocoa percentages. Which should I be using?
    Also, is it bad to use compound chocolate?
    Thanks so much!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 28, 2019 at 4:43 am

      Hi Jessie,
      good question! Compound chocolate is commonly know as cooking chocolate, and is a blend of cocoa/vegetable fats and sweeteners in most cases. It is ok as a frosting, for cupcakes for instance, not so much for real chocolate flavor.
      Cooking chocolate may also be the real deal, as in have a high cocoa solid percentage, and I would buy that on price. If it is better value that the eating/dessert choc then buy that one.
      I hope this is of help to you, carry on baking!
      Gemma 🙂

      • Jessie on March 6, 2019 at 4:03 pm

        Thanks Gemma!

  2. Dede on February 27, 2019 at 7:58 pm

    Thank You for said information. May I ask what company you use for baking bar and unsweetened cocoa powder ?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 28, 2019 at 4:34 am

      Hi Dede,
      here in the US we are lucky enough to get a gorgeous artisan chocolate from a company called Ghirardelli.
      In other places, where this may not be available, what matter is understanding the chocolate, read the article, it will tell you how to choose the right one for you. It is all in that post!
      I hope you find one to suit,
      Gemma 🙂

  3. Lily117lover on February 25, 2019 at 10:42 pm

    Thanks for the information gemma! It’s really helpful! 😄

    By the way, can u share recipe pot de creme of yours?

    I’ve done it before but its still got eggy smell.. Had tried it with lemon n vanilla extract, but still cant get rid of the smell..

    • Gemma Stafford on February 26, 2019 at 10:24 am

      Hi, that’s a great idea! I’ll have to work on a recipe for that!

  4. Dickson Donna on February 24, 2019 at 6:21 pm

    I really like the information you give. You are never to old to learn or being reminded of things you have forgotten. Thanks!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 9:18 am

      It’s my pleasure!

  5. Marla Dalton on February 24, 2019 at 5:34 pm

    That was very. Informative👍 i enjoy refreshing way you put recipes. Great job!

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 9:23 am

      I’m delighted to hear that, thank you!

  6. Ursula on February 24, 2019 at 5:33 pm

    Thank you for the great info. It’s very useful to know. So do you just buy good quality chocolate bars or baking squares?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 9:22 am

      Hi, i use a good quality baking bar that i buy in bulk.

  7. Wanda on February 24, 2019 at 5:12 pm

    Watched the video Gemma. Thank you for showing the differences in chocolates. Have a good evening! ♥♥♥

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 9:31 am

      It’s my pleasure!

  8. Boyd Kent Harris on February 24, 2019 at 11:36 am

    Hi,Emma.
    I enjoy receiving your emails with various recipes and being able to understand various cooking methods and uses.
    I look forward to many more exciting things that you choose to share.
    Thank You,
    Kent Harris

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 9:40 am

      Thank you! I am delighted to hear that!

  9. Erika Cronje on February 24, 2019 at 10:42 am

    YOU mention COcoa powder but what about CAcao powder, which I believe is the better quality?

    • Gemma Stafford on February 27, 2019 at 2:17 am

      Hi Erika,
      These are different things, cacao is a very lightly processed, un-roasted type of cocoa. It is stronger, and just not the same thing as the processed cocoa we use in baking usually.
      Cacao is richer in nutrients than cocoa, but it is treated differently, you are not comparing like with like.
      I suggest you google this to understand it, I do not use it in baking, and that is why it is not on my sheet, you cannot use it 1:1.
      I hope this is of help to you,
      Gemma 🙂

  10. Nana Osei-Tutu on February 24, 2019 at 8:15 am

    I love this post because I feel that people need to understand chocolate more, me included! I do wish you covered couverture chocolate though, that is still a mystery to many people.

    • Gemma Stafford on February 25, 2019 at 4:42 pm

      Oh, i’ll have to work on getting together some info about that too, thank you!

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